In previous years, this was a memory box so we didn't miss any good nominations for the Cappies. With the Cappies hypertimed away, that doesn't mean we have to discontinue these threads. I've always liked going back at the end of the year and seeing the books and stories and moments that people really champion -- including plenty of stuff that I've forgotten about come Christmastime. 

So have at it, Legionnaires! What in 2016 has knocked you out?

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I was pretty impressed with it, too. I hope it was cathartic for him to write.

Jack Kirby’s Machine Man tpb.

“Mister Machine’s” first three appearances are tied up in rights issues (governing the contents of anything published in the title 2001: A Space Odyssey), but other than that, this tpb reprints exactly what it should: all the Kirby issues, all the Ditko issues, and the Hulk three-parter in between. This has moved to the top of my reading list.

Just putting it out there to codify something we've been talking about in Pick of the Week:

Flintstones is amazing, against all expectations... and Detective Comics is suddenly DC's best team book. 

I finished "The Man Whole Stole the World" arc from Velvet, and it was just terrific. And in the spirit of the Cappies: Velvet Templeton is not only a favorite female character she is a favorite character. 

YES!

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Just putting it out there to codify something we've been talking about in Pick of the Week:

Flintstones is amazing, against all expectations... and Detective Comics is suddenly DC's best team book. 

I recently finished reading a fantastic book by Sonny Liew called The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye. There is no way that this will not be in my top three books read this year--graphic or otherwise.

This is to comic books what Woody Allen's Sweet and Lowdown is to jazz. It is a fictional account of a seemingly real legend of the comic book world. All of the art--in its various looks--is done by Sonny Liew. It's about a man from Singapore who is one of the comic book legends, some say underrated, who rose to the top through all kinds of warfare, martial law, and uprisings.

This book is just so good. I want to put it in the hands of everyone I talk to with even a trace interest in comic books.

Velvet... that reminds me. I read the first story in periodical format, then decided to traidwait, but so far I haven't picked up any trades. I really must look into that. what issue are we up to now?

I think issue 18. The book's on hiatus, as the main first story is complete. I don't think the final trade's been released yet. She'll be back, I'm sure. 

Sensei, that sounds incredible!

Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man said:

I recently finished reading a fantastic book by Sonny Liew called The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye. There is no way that this will not be in my top three books read this year--graphic or otherwise.

This is to comic books what Woody Allen's Sweet and Lowdown is to jazz. It is a fictional account of a seemingly real legend of the comic book world. All of the art--in its various looks--is done by Sonny Liew. It's about a man from Singapore who is one of the comic book legends, some say underrated, who rose to the top through all kinds of warfare, martial law, and uprisings.

This book is just so good. I want to put it in the hands of everyone I talk to with even a trace interest in comic books.

COMIC BOOK FEVER: A Celebration of Comics – 1976 to 1986:

I bought this on a whim yesterday, and I’m really glad I did. I vaguely remember seeing it solicited in Previews a couple of months ago, but it didn’t impress me at the time. As soon as I saw the Alex Ross cover and flipped through it, I knew it was coming home with me.

The book covers 78 different topics, mostly comics, but also things advertised in comics, comics-related toys, and creator profiles. There’s really nothing blatantly missing from this era (as far as Marvel and DC are concerned), and a whole lot is included one might not expect. When it gets to the independent era, I question why only a few titles are included (notably Love & Rockets and Nexus) while so many others were left out. That’s a minor quibble, though.

This book is profusely illustrated.

Published by TwoMorrows.

Wanted to mention Dreaming Eagles, a 6-issue miniseries by Garth Ennis and Simon Coleby published by Aftershock here. The main plot is an account of one of the Tuskegee Airmen about his service in World War II. A really solid war comic, full of hope and tragedy and frustration and all the things you'd expect from the subject matter. 

But what really puts this book over the top for me is the framing sequence. It's set in the 60s, and it's a conversation between the father (the pilot) and his son, who's just now learning what his dad did in the war. The reason for the conversation? The son is planning on joining with Martin Luther King at rallies, and the father's worried for his safety. There are a lot of complex emotions running through this book. There's the knowledge that standing up is the right thing to do, but also a palpable awareness that  to do so is to risk safety. I just read the final issue today, and there's a conversation at a breakfast table that wraps it up perfectly.

I'd forgotten how good Ennis can be. 

Last night I finished reading Indeh by Ethan Hawke and Greg Ruth. A simply incredible graphic novel about the Apache Wars . I absolutely loved the story, and oh my goodness Ruth's art is breathtaking. One of my favorite reads in quite some time.

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