As we are about to embark one the next box of my unread comics, I would like to thank all of you who come to read and/or comment on these threads. When I first started this project back in July 2006  (really?) on the old board I never thought I would even make it through the first box. The threads have helped keep me semi-honest here.

I'm pretty excited about this upcoming box. It is a very eclectic mix of comics. There are a bunch of my old standbys. Like Legion comics, Daredevil, Marvel Team-up, war comics. There is a ton of other stuff like '80s black and white comics, some Kirby, a touch of Vertigo. I don't know how much will inspire me to write about, and if it does others to comment, but I am looking forward to it.

I'm really stoked to have you with me. Let's get it on!

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I think a war run or excessively interfered with by people in striped pants rather than soldiers, which is to say college-educated types working in non-military parts of government such as cabinet officials or diplomats.

Great review of B&B Travis.  That Haney was a law unto himself, it seems.  I must read more of his stuff.

Generally I think it's Bob Haney's world and the rest of us just live in it. His (non-)approach to continuity was refreshingly un-neurotic when stacked up against the rest of the DC Universe monolith of writers. But even I couldn't get behind his repeated use of Sgt. Rock in B&B. I have a feeling that that first Rock appearance, which should have been a one-and-only event, must have been awfully popular and forced their hand to keep bringing him back.

Believe it or not, there was a sense of continuity in Bob Haney's Brave & Bold stories but usually only in relation to his previous B&B stories.

Sgt. Rock was a popular guest star appearing in #84 (Jl'69), #96 (Jl'71), #108 (S'73), #117 (Ma'75), #124 (Ja'76), Brave & Bold Special #1 (1978) with Deadman and #162 (My'80). The last one was the only besides the first to take place during WWII but it's the only one that definitely happened on Earth-Two.

I've said before that Rock showing up in "modern" times was at odds with his own title but maybe Haney was aping Nick Fury in that regard. If Fury survived the war, then Rock had to as well!

Weirder was that Haney had Rock get old (much like Wildcat) yet Batman was forever young. Bruce must know Tarzan! Still, Rock's age and the army's treatment of him because of it is a recurring theme along with Rock acting psychotic!

Weirdest yet was his later B&Bs where he knows Batman's secret identity!!

Growing up however the majority of my exposure to the Rock of Easy Company were these issues!!

Craig Boldman said:

Generally I think it's Bob Haney's world and the rest of us just live in it. His (non-)approach to continuity was refreshingly un-neurotic when stacked up against the rest of the DC Universe monolith of writers. But even I couldn't get behind his repeated use of Sgt. Rock in B&B. I have a feeling that that first Rock appearance, which should have been a one-and-only event, must have been awfully popular and forced their hand to keep bringing him back.

 

I think, especially back in those days, if anything proved to be popular no editor's hand is "forced" to do it again; they would happily bring anything back that sold.

Philip Portelli said:

Believe it or not, there was a sense of continuity in Bob Haney's Brave & Bold stories but usually only in relation to his previous B&Bstories.

Sgt. Rock was a popular guest star appearing in #84 (Jl'69), #96 (Jl'71), #108 (S'73), #117 (Ma'75), #124 (Ja'76), Brave & Bold Special#1 (1978) with Deadman and #162 (My'80). The last one was the only besides the first to take place during WWII but it's the only one that definitely happened on Earth-Two.

I've said before that Rock showing up in "modern" times was at odds with his own title but maybe Haney was aping Nick Fury in that regard. If Fury survived the war, then Rock had toas well!

Weirder was that Haney had Rock get old (much like Wildcat) yet Batman was forever young. Bruce must know Tarzan! Still, Rock's age and the army's treatment of him because of it is a recurring theme along with Rock acting psychotic!

Weirdest yet was his later B&Bs where he knows Batman's secret identity!!

 

Rock knows Batman's secret identity? I never saw that story ...!

 

Growing up however the majority of my exposure to the Rock of Easy Company were these issues!!

We should talk; I'm a BIG Sgt. Rock fan.

Luke Blanchard said:

I think a war run or excessively interfered with by people in striped pants rather than soldiers, which is to say college-educated types working in non-military parts of government such as cabinet officials or diplomats.

Ah, thanks, Luke. Not a term I am familiar with at all.

Figs said:

Great review of B&B Travis.  That Haney was a law unto himself, it seems.  I must read more of his stuff.

They are pretty crazy, yet they are also usually pretty fun. I didn't intentionally go out to buy these two classic examples I just sort of did on the cheap. I'm not even that big of a Rock fan, although I am becoming more of one as I get more into the old war books.

Clark (or anyone else who knows), was Rock always a blonde? He was here, but I've read so little of his adventures I don't recall seeing him without his helmet, and I don't have my Who's Who handy.

Travis Herrick said:

Clark (or anyone else who knows), was Rock always a blonde? He was here, but I've read so little of his adventures I don't recall seeing him without his helmet, and I don't have my Who's Who handy.

Yes, Rock has always been a blond, or sort of a strawberry blond.

On consideration, I don't think I got it right. (To be honest, I missed the fact that it was the title and thought it was an expression used in the story.) I think striped pants are often associated with diplomats. My assumption is this is for class reasons, ambassadors being drawn from those who have elite educations. It looks to me like the title is supposed to sound incongruous and refers to Rock's position as a diplomat with a military past who finds himself in a new fight.

Groovy, thanks to the both of ya!

Rock knows Batman's secret identity? I never saw that story...!

In Rock's next Brave & Bold appearance (#108), the Sarge meets up with Bruce Wayne, acts like old friends, compare notes on the mysterious old man they're trying to find. Which is all find and dandy until Rock casually states that he is well aware that Bruce is Batman! That must have been a shock to the readers!

Plus Bruce is puffing away on a pipe the entire scene!

As a kid, I never paid much attention to the War books except for the occassional Unknown Soldier but now I have all the DC War Showcases.

If I might ask, which of them are the best?

Are you asking which of the war books are the best, Luke? If so, *not* The War That Time Forgot. Somehow DC took the awesome premise of soldiers versus dinosaurs, and made it really boring. I was a fan of the Haunted Tank stuff, but that got pretty repetitive, and I think I liked it more than others. I really like The Losers one, that was the quickest I had ever read any of the Showcase/Essential volumes.

I think in the beginning Weird War Tales was really good. Before it got too mired in just doing World War II stories.

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