Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Well done guys. Me, I'm struggling to find more English language comics starting with 'E' so I'm switching to foreign comics. Here's El Bravo - It's an Italian comic and that's about all I know.

"The End of the Green Goblin"

Yeah, right!

Steve W said:

Here's El Bravo - It's an Italian comic

I found the issue at Comic Book Plus. It has three features: "El Bravo", about a masked Western hero; "Marino", about a boy who belongs to an amphibious race that lives in an undersea land; and "Slim", about a youth with great strength. The cover shows a scene from the "Slim" instalment.

My "E" company: Eternity(and a Jack Kirby FF #1homage to boot).

Emergency! #1 (1976).

Star Trek: Assignment Earth

It seems like folks liked Dell's Espionage; it is a striking cover.  The TV show, which I don't think I ever saw, and if I did, I certainly don't remember it, did not have reoccurring characters.  The comic book seemed to follow that pattern, at least according to the GCD.  I thought I owned it, but it turns out I don't.  I did find the first story, "The Chameleon," online at Saved From the Paper Drive (November 2, 2012) http://savedfromthepaperdrive.blogspot.com/2012/11/comic-book-short....  The art is by Jack Sparling, but it isn't as rushed as some of his other Dell art. I thought the story worked well, and the (little) "twist" at the end was fine as it closed a possible plot hole, and elevated it above pedestrian.

The only thing connecting this comic to the TV series is the title.  The stories don't appear to be adaptations.  Why would Dell pay extra for the license and then produce what is essentially a generic anthology which is then copyrighted in NBC 's name?  They did the same thing with Outer Limits --did the title/name recognition sell enough extra copies to justify the license?  I guess we'll never know.  The same could be said for Gold Key's Twilight Zone and Boris Karloff -- besides the "hosts" there really wasn't anything different about the two from other "mystery" comics of the time.  Ripley's Believe It or Not! may be a slightly different situation, but maybe not; I would guess those stories could have also fit in any generic "mystery" comic with a modicum of tinkering.

Dell's Combat does predate the TV series Combat!, although a licensed Combat! comic might have sold well.  Space Family Robinson/Lost in Space presents a different situation.

Interestingly, in the indicia Jack Kirby's extension of 2001:  A Space Odyssey mentions that it is copyright Marvel but based on material copyright Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.  I wonder if they had to sort out the rights to Mister Machine/Machine Man, who was introduced in issue #8 (July 1977).  A monolith was involved in his origin.  Again, I guess we'll never know.

Dave, your comments remind me of a couple of things.

Last month I posted the Showcase cover of the Dr No adaptation. This is the cover of the British Classic Illustrated(!) printing that was reused in the Showcase #43. Showcase #43 had an on-sale date of January 31, 1963. The movie's first day of release was October 7, 1962, so both the original Classics Illustrated and the Showcase comics were produced before anyone had seen the movie, presumably from the movie script. I no longer have the Showcase comic, but IIRC the look of the characters had little in common with the movie.

The Gold Key Star Trek comics were produced by people in Italy, I believe, who didn't have access to the TV show. They made a lot of mistakes with the characters and the technology as a result.

Dave Palmer said:

It seems like folks liked Dell's Espionage; it is a striking cover.

Is it just me, or was the guy on the cover modelled after Patrick McGoohan? From what I can tell Secret Agent hadn't yet aired in the US, and the issue came out less than a month after the start of The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh.

The only thing connecting this comic to the TV series is the title... Why would Dell pay extra for the license and then produce what is essentially a generic anthology which is then copyrighted in NBC 's name?

Here are my guesses:

-It was a competitive industry, and anything that might get a reader to pick an issue up was a help.

-Perhaps Dell didn't have to pay much for some licenses. The comics were a kind of advertising for the shows, so the TV people may have been eager to see them happen. Also, if Dell had other NBC licenses it may have wanted to keep NBC happy.

-When Dell did Espionage it didn't know the TV show wasn't going to be a smash hit! Passing on it would've risked losing the license. Dell may have seen The Outer Limits as a replacement for The Twilight Zone, which it lost when it split with Western.

-I don't have a very good understanding of how the ordering system worked. Using licenses may have been helpful to getting comics into stores and displayed.

The Emerald Empress: one of my picks for Top 10 DC Super-Villainesses!

Luke Blanchard said:

-I don't have a very good understanding of how the ordering system worked. Using licenses may have been helpful to getting comics into stores and displayed.

When Espionage came out I don't believe there was any ordering. There was no direct market, and no comic stores that ordered in the way they do today. The distributors delivered the comics and other magazines (all returnable) to the newsstands and drug stores however they saw fit.

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