Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Batman #181: First appearance of Poison Ivy!

Sadly the Toxic Temptress is forever consigned as the Caped Crusader's THIRD best femme fatale! But she's still one of DC's ten best villainesses!

There have been a few heroes named "Patriot." Any heroes from Philly to match?

There's always the Phantom Eagle.

He was semi-recycled on a Fawcett WWII hero who appeared in Wow Comics. Other Marvel heroes recycled from non-Marvel ones from that time-frame were the Old West Ghost Rider (1966), Captain Marvel (1967), and Yellowjacket (1968). The Black Knight (1967) was possibly partly based on the Shining Knight, and the Vision (1968) was possibly partly based on Manowar, the White Streak.

Quality’s Quicksilver may or may not fit as well.  Super speed was well established as a superpower by the time Marvel’s Quicksilver appeared, so it’s highly unlikely he was a direct influence.  When DC brought back Quicksilver he became Max Mercury.

Where does Daredevil fit in this discussion?

Luke Blanchard said:

He was semi-recycled on a Fawcett WWII hero who appeared in Wow Comics. Other Marvel heroes recycled from non-Marvel ones from that time-frame were the Old West Ghost Rider (1966), Captain Marvel (1967), and Yellowjacket (1968). The Black Knight (1967) was possibly partly based on the Shining Knight, and the Vision (1968) was possibly partly based on Manowar, the White Streak.

Or the Comet with Cyclops?

Dave Palmer said:

Quality’s Quicksilver may or may not fit as well.  Super speed was well established as a superpower by the time Marvel’s Quicksilver appeared, so it’s highly unlikely he was a direct influence.  When DC brought back Quicksilver he became Max Mercury.

Where does Daredevil fit in this discussion?

Luke Blanchard said:

He was semi-recycled on a Fawcett WWII hero who appeared in Wow Comics. Other Marvel heroes recycled from non-Marvel ones from that time-frame were the Old West Ghost Rider (1966), Captain Marvel (1967), and Yellowjacket (1968). The Black Knight (1967) was possibly partly based on the Shining Knight, and the Vision (1968) was possibly partly based on Manowar, the White Streak.

Other than that Goodman ordered Lee to come up with another hero in the style of Spider-Man and that Lee got Everett to come back to Marvel to do the art but then wound up several months late (and hence necessitating the very quick creation of the Avengers as a fill in for the printers), I haven't read much about what went into the creation of Daredevil, such as was Lee influenced at all by the once very popular Golden Age character who used a boomerang as a weapon, had spikes on his belt, was mute and hung out with a bunch of kids who eventually took over his title.  Probably all there was to it was that "Daredevil" was a good superhero name that had been out of circulation for several years and hence was available.  The main resemblance to Spider-Man is DD's billy club with grappling hook and very strong but thin wire with which to swing around the big city much like Spidey with his webs.  Of course, seems to me that it would be impossible for any actual human being to travel via billy club wire & hook the way DD is shown doing, but that was just another fantasy element fans take in stride.

Dick Ayers was involved in both Marvel’s and Magazine Enterprises Ghost Rider.  According to Wikipedia he had a hand in creating both.  Just imagine if C. C. Beck had been involved in Marvel’s Captain Marvel. Around that time Beck was involved with Lightning Comics (Fatman the Human Flying Saucer) which had advertised Captain Shazam, “A Turned on Super Swinger.”

I think of Marvel's early Silver Age as a different phase. Aside from the characters mentioned I'd throw in Mr Fantastic (from Plastic Man), the Hulk (likely intended as a Code-compliant version of Prize's Frankenstein), Spider-Man (from Joe Simon's unpublished Spiderman, who Simon remodelled into Silver Spider and then the Fly), Thor (from Fox's Thor), Iron Man (from Bozo the Robot), Hawkeye (from Green Arrow), Black Bolt (named for Blue Bolt), and the Black Panther (partly modelled after the Phantom). Also the Miracle Man (Mandrake the Magician gone wrong). Doctor Strange's name was recycled via the Iron Man villain from Doc Strange. There were several Golden Age Doctor Dooms.

John Romita has said the remodelled Black Widow was modelled after Miss Fury. Sgt. Fury may have been modelled after "Boy Commandos" via a newspaper strip Kirby proposed.

I think it's clear Daredevil was partly based on the Gleason Daredevil: they both have skin-tight costumes and are athletic fighters rather than physical superhumans. (But I was surprised to notice recently Matt's first issue implies the radiation upgraded his physical abilities as well as his senses.) Bill Everett's daughter said she inspired Daredevil's super-senses. The GA hero's boomerang may have been the inspiration for the SA hero's billy club. 

“Phantom of the Space-Opera”

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