In the recent Joker/Daffy Duck comic (Side Note: The latest batch of DC/WB crossovers are neither especially good or especially bad), there's a scene in which the Joker kills the patrons of a comedy club and has his gang take their stuff (Another Side Note: Who in the Blue Hell would go to a comedy club in Gotham City? That's just asking for trouble!), and this scene inspired in me a sudden realization.

Now, I'll say up front that I'm sure I'm not the first person to have this realization (or the tenth, or the hundredth, or the thousandth...), it's just something that I never really thought about all that much before.

Anyway, the great realization was this:  

There's no (expletive gerund omitted) way that someone wouldn't have killed the Joker by now.  Victim's grieving relative, vigilante, fed-up cop, "accident in the cells", a villain who's sick of the Joker's crap - someone would have wasted him by now.   I can no longer sustain my suspension of disbelief as regards this character.

 

Views: 513

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

That sounds like a Denny O’Neil story.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Captain Comics said:

On the DC side, several characters -- like Batman -- continued to deny the existence of magic in their own books while dealing with it routinely in Justice League and so forth. It made them look like fools if you read the whole line.

That more or less ended in 2011, but even still, Batman still scoffs when someone suggests magic in Detective or Batman.

My ever-hazy memory does cling to something I never forgot once I saw it*: Batman was up against a villain called Doctor Tzin-Tzin, a wannabe Fu Manchu who uses mysticism as misdirection. As he and Alfred prepare a trap, Alfred says surely you don't believe in things like the power to put people in trances.

Batman's reply: "Belief is unnecessary, Alfred. Things work or they don't! Does electricity depend on your belief in it?"

* It was in Batman #284 (February 1977). I just spent way too much time looking it up.

It was David V. Reed.

Captain Comics said:

That sounds like a Denny O’Neil story.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Captain Comics said:

On the DC side, several characters -- like Batman -- continued to deny the existence of magic in their own books while dealing with it routinely in Justice League and so forth. It made them look like fools if you read the whole line.

That more or less ended in 2011, but even still, Batman still scoffs when someone suggests magic in Detective or Batman.

My ever-hazy memory does cling to something I never forgot once I saw it*: Batman was up against a villain called Doctor Tzin-Tzin, a wannabe Fu Manchu who uses mysticism as misdirection. As he and Alfred prepare a trap, Alfred says surely you don't believe in things like the power to put people in trances.

Batman's reply: "Belief is unnecessary, Alfred. Things work or they don't! Does electricity depend on your belief in it?"

* It was in Batman #284 (February 1977). I just spent way too much time looking it up.

As for Batman not believing in magic, I agree that it's nonsensical in a universe where magic has been seen to exist. I've long felt that a character like Batman isn't a perfect "fit" for a "super-hero" universe. He can be made to fit, but to my mind, he would work better in a world without magic or superhumans in it.
As an addendum to my previous post, when Barbara Gordon was left paralyzed after being shot by the Joker, I couldn't help but wonder why Zatanna wasn't called in to say "Arabrab, eb delaeh!"

Not only was magic available to fix Barbara, but also Kryptonian, Atlantean, Themysciran, Martian and Thanagarian technology. That a player in the superhero world as allowed to suffer with something as straightforward as nerve damage when death is routinely fixed is ridiculous.

This goes to the concept that was recently discussed somewhere on the board. The presence of superheroes and supertechnology would change society unrecognizably. How would they justify healing Barbara but not people in the general public.

I've often said that if I got the Green Lantern ring, one of the first thing I'd have it do is research every disease throughout the GL database and terrestrial medical books and let it become Super Dr. Power Ring. Then I'd go around to children's hospitals and have it cure as many as possible. Bank robbers can wait.

It's a ridiculousness I'm entirely comfortable with. I think the stories (and the DCU as a whole) were better served by Barbara struggling with her disability (and finding a way to fight crime despite it) than they would have been by some superhero ex machina healing her spine. 




Captain Comics said:

Not only was magic available to fix Barbara, but also Kryptonian, Atlantean, Themysciran, Martian and Thanagarian technology. That a player in the superhero world as allowed to suffer with something as straightforward as nerve damage when death is routinely fixed is ridiculous.

I agree with Rob. I've said before that Barbara as wheelchair-bound Oracle was a better character than as yet another acrobatic crime fighter.  

And let us not forget that it was as Oracle that Barbara joined the JLA, not as Batgirl.

And that there was already another Batgirl (or two) out there at that time.

I've long believed that Barbara's best destiny was as Oracle. But it is equally true that it was implausible that a member of the Bat-family suffered in a world with all those potential fixes.

I can hold both opinions. Do I contradict myself? So I do. I am vast, I contain multitudes.

Barbara as Oracle works great in a non-super-hero universe.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2018   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service