Am I the only comics fan who's NOT all that worked up over the MCU?  I've seen at most a third of the MCU pictures and have no real great desire to see any of the rest of them,  (I haven't seen any DC movies either, not since the Batman one that killed Heath Ledger.)

Don't get me wrong, I'm not against them, the few I've seen were mostly OK, and if people are enjoying the others, good for them, but I just can't get worked up over them. It's just that I see people here and on social media getting all worked up over Avengers: Endgame like it's this big epochal event, and I'm starting to seriously wonder if there's something wrong with me as a comics fan (I know there's plenty of things wrong with me in other areas) because I really just don't care about it. I mean, I love the Avengers as a concept. With the League and the Society, they're one of my three favorite super-teams.

I'm not fed up with super-heroes or anything  - I love One-Punch Man and My Hero Academia.

I just feel like the odd one out, because I just don't get it.

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ClarkKent_DC said:

I remember that while it was in production, my friendly neighborhood comic shop was one of many circulating a petition protesting the casting of Michael Keaton as Batman. I don't remember if I signed it.

Richard Willis said:

I was never one who was against Michael Keaton playing Batman. Even though most of his work up to then was comedy, I was aware that the previous year he had starred in and had good reviews for the serious drama Clean and Sober.

That was the prevailing counterargument to Keaton being cast in Batman.

Thanks...Don't forget O.B. McClinton's " The Only One "!!!!!!!!! And Chesney Hawkes' " The One And Only " while we're at it...

I've seen 12 of the 22 MCU movies.  I plan to see Captain Marvel soon and then Avengers Endgame.  I'm sure at some point I'll watch the ones I've missed, but if I don't get to see them all, I'll be ok with that too.  Some of them are good, sometimes very good, and some have just been meh.  I found the earliest ones to be the most enjoyable, excluding the 2008 Incredible Hulk movie.  I think I'm one of a handful of people who liked the 2003 Ang Lee Hulk movie better.

I think if the movies had stopped at the first Avengers flick, that would have been nearly perfect, but of course since almost all of the movies were box offices smashes, sequels were inevitable.  I kind of burned out on the MCU after the 2nd Iron Man and Thor movies, which I found a chore to get through, and that killed my desire to see Captain America Winter Soldier.  I passed on GotG, although I did go see Avengers Age of Ultron and Ant-Man.  The latter would be the last MCU film I would see until Black Panther last year, and I also saw Avengers Infinity War.

I know what people are saying about the origins, but we have to remember while most of us could probably recite a detailed account of each major character's origin from memory, this is all new to the non-comic reading public.  Those origins were recapped for us dozens if not hundreds of times over many decades.  It's often a key part of what makes these heroes tick, and it has resonated with movie goers.  My guess is that the origin is a beat in the story that won't go away.

I tend to agree with the Dunbar regarding the origins. Even now, most people don''t know them as well as we do.

I have to say that many of the Marvel movies don't do a traditional origin story for their first movies.

In fact, out of the 22 existing Marvel movies, I would say that only Captain America the First Avenger, The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, Avengers, Doctor Strange, Captain Marvel, and Guardians of the Galaxy were proper origin stories.

I would argue that Ant-Man, Spider-Man, and Black Panther wouldn't be actual origin stories. Ant-Man was already in place with an older character before Scott Lang came along, Spider-Man's origin was in YouTube videos as a part of Civil War, and Black Panther's world was a thing long before his movie came around.

That's only 7 out of 22 by my count (which is arguable, I'll admit). That's less than 1/3 of the movies.

But I have to admit that I'm saying this as a big fan of the franchise, so I'm not exactly unbiased. (Are any of us actually unbiased?)

John Dunbar said:

I've seen 12 of the 22 MCU movies.  I plan to see Captain Marvel soon and then Avengers Endgame.  I'm sure at some point I'll watch the ones I've missed, but if I don't get to see them all, I'll be ok with that too.  Some of them are good, sometimes very good, and some have just been meh.  I found the earliest ones to be the most enjoyable, excluding the 2008 Incredible Hulk movie.  I think I'm one of a handful of people who liked the 2003 Ang Lee Hulk movie better.

I think if the movies had stopped at the first Avengers flick, that would have been nearly perfect, but of course since almost all of the movies were box offices smashes, sequels were inevitable.  I kind of burned out on the MCU after the 2nd Iron Man and Thor movies, which I found a chore to get through, and that killed my desire to see Captain America Winter Soldier.  I passed on GotG, although I did go see Avengers Age of Ultron and Ant-Man.  The latter would be the last MCU film I would see until Black Panther last year, and I also saw Avengers Infinity War.

I highly recommend you see Captain America: The Winter Soldier. It's a spy thriller in the vein of Three Days of the Condor, superhero-style.

Wholeheartedly agree. The Winter Soldier is a contender for the best of the Marvel movies. 

One reason Winter Soldier was so good was that it had strong overtones of an espionage movie. That really set it apart, not only from other Marvel movies, but paint-by-the-numbers drek like Justice League.

A lot of critics like to talk about the "Marvel formula," but the movies do vary (in my mind) quite a bit. Maybe Thor 2 and Iron Man 2 and 3 -- my three least favorite -- fit a formula. But Guardians of the Galaxy has about as much in common with Winter Soldier as Catch 22 does with Spy Who Came in from the Cold -- except that a lot of the principals wear costumes instead of uniforms. I've often argued that one of the things Stan Lee did that he deserves credit for that he rarely gets, is treating "superhero" as a medium to tell a lot of different kinds of stories (only BIGGER) instead of a genre that tells a single kind of story.

I think the first two Thor movies missed the boat by trying to be too superhero-ey instead of leaning into the Game of Thrones milieu. I think they should have been high fantasy in the Nine Realms, instead of Thor doing "fish out of water" on Earth. Taiki Waititi got it right in Ragnarok, not only making Thor much funnier, but not shooting a single frame on Earth. (Well, maybe one. I don't remember if he did. I just remember the cool stuff on Sakaar.)

And why on Earth did they abandon the Kirby design for Frost Giants in Thor: The Dark World? They used CGI for them anyway (I think), so how much harder would it have been to have big, spectacular ice giants instead of mostly ordinary people who happened to be blue?

Game of Thrones, oddly, didn't make that mistake. They lifted Kirby's Storm Giants in their entirety for design of their giants from beyond The Wall.

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