So earlier this afternoon, I did finally come across my collection of Amalgam Comics, the Marvel/DC crossover where they literally combined the universes and characters into one world. It was from the late 90's, and it was a really awesome experience. The best writers and artists from both companies pitched in and delivered some truly special books.

So my question is this: How much interest is there on this board in doing a reading project through these books? I'd love to get one going if anybody else is game, and I'm pretty sure Jeff of Earth J would love to join in as well, although I can speak only for myself.

I know I will get much more out of a current reading, because my only Marvel reading at the time barely scraped the surface of the company. The majority of my Marvel reading experience was within about the last ten or fifteen years. I know I will pick up many more references this time.

Let me know who else would be interested in one of the most grin-inducing events of the 90's.

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Spider-Boy, Part 2

Page 12:

  • Spider-Boy enters his workplace in his alias, Pete Ross. I love this because it combines the actual character from Superboy, Pete Ross, and combines it with both Peter Parker and Thunderbolt Ross.

Page 13:

  • Tana Moon, reporter for the Daily Bugle shows up. Tana Moon was Superboy's news-reporter girlfriend in the 90's series by Kesel and Tom Grummett. I never liked this, because Superboy was supposed to be somewhere between 14-16, and Tana Moon was his girlfriend. Her name was never expressly stated, but she was old enough to be a star reporter for her news station, which would make her an adult, which would make her a pedophile. I've been told that I am overthinking it, but it will never make sense to me.
  • Here we get Mr. J. Jonah Jameson in the flesh.
  • We also see Pete Ross with the half-Spider-Boy face like Peter Parker often gets when he is having Spider-Man thoughts.
  • Another reporter for the DB, Jack Ryder, is in this scene as well. Jack Ryder is also known as the Creeper in the DCU, who is a bombastic TV news personality.

Page 14:

  • The Spider-Boy song is referred to as he sings it himself. Of course, this refers to the Spider-Man theme song.
  • King Lizard is seen in "person".

Page 15:

  • The New York Special Crimes Unit appears. This comes from the Metropolis Special Crimes Unit, who played a big part (they even had their own miniseries) in the Superman comics in the 90's. This team consists of Flash Thompson (Spider-Man's arch-rival), Roxy Leech (Superboy's age-appropriate other girlfriend), "Brooklyn" Barnes (Bucky and "Terrible" Turpin combo).

Page 16:

  • Roxy mentions the fact that Barnes was once a member of the Young Commandos, presumably a combo of the Young Allies and the Boy Commandos.
  • Captain Makoa is Sam Makoa, from the Superboy comic at the time.

Page 17:

  • Pym is referred to as the "big man on campus" at Cadmus.
  • Superboy mentions his JLA Jr. Detective Merit Badge. The Justice League once sent these out to their junior members.
  • The "Phantom Negative-Zone Protector" is spoken of. This is a combo of the Phantom Zone from DC, and the Negative Zone from Marvel.
  • "The Mother Cube" is a combo of the Mother Box of DC and the Cosmic Cube of Marvel.

Page 18:

  • Doc Palmer's White Dwarf Prototype Gun. I already mentioned Ray Palmer's White Dwarf Star studies, but this is the first time the gun is mentioned. It seems similar to the Phantom Zone projector.

Page 20:

  • The Sub-Atomic Universe is an Amalgam Universe version of the Microverse.

Page 21:

  • Tamojoran Blue-Bloods are referenced. I know the DC side of this is Tamaran, but I have no idea what the Marvel half of it is.
  • Spider-Boy says, "You're here to tell me I'm a clone, right?" This beautifully references both Spider-Man and his clone saga with the fact that Superboy was actually a clone of Superman.
  • Mary Jane Watson is spoken of just before...

Page 22:

  • In her Insect Queen guise, Mary Jane says, "Face it, Spider--you just hit the jackpot."

Needless to say, I loved this comic. It's one of my all-time favorite single issues.


Tana Moon, reporter for the Daily Bugle shows up. Tana Moon was Superboy's news-reporter girlfriend in the 90's series by Kesel and Tom Grummett. I never liked this, because Superboy was supposed to be somewhere between 14-16, and Tana Moon was his girlfriend. Her name was never expressly stated, but she was old enough to be a star reporter for her news station, which would make her an adult, which would make her a pedophile. I've been told that I am overthinking it, but it will never make sense to me.

Are we sure how old she was supposed to be?   I mean, if  Billy Batson  could be a radio star when he was like ten, or whatever, she might well be underage, as well.

Tamojoran Blue-Bloods are referenced. I know the DC side of this is Tamaran, but I have no idea what the Marvel half of it is.

I think it's something to do with an old X-Men character called Mojo, ruler of the Mojoverse.

I meant to say that they never expressly said her age, not her name. Anyway, I hadn't thought about it in terms of Billy Batson, but I don't think they ever said she was a kid. Of course, this is 25 years after the fact, so I have no idea. All I know is it rubbed me the wrong way, and it became especially pronounced when Tana and Knockout were fighting over him later on in the series.

And Mojo, that makes sense.

Yeah, I always figured Tana Moon was a teenager, or at most 21 -- in any event, not way older than the perpetual teenager Superboy.

As for someone that young being a TV reporter, I didn't give it a second's thought. If I did, I could probably find a way to justify it. Tana was a reporter for a TV station in Hawaii, which isn't exactly one of the top 10 markets ... or top 20, or top 50. Thus she would get a lot of leeway in a dues-paying role; at a place where people come and go all the time because it's just a stepping stone to bigger markets. 

Geez, I'm falling behind. March is gong to be a really busy month for me (I didn't have the opportunity to post at all yeaterday), and probably april and possible May as well. In June I move from a cube into a pod, so after that we'll have to see.

You'll move from a what into a what?

Lobo the Duck #1

Alan Grant and Val Semeiks

I was about to say this was one of my favorite Amalgam books, but it's really a dumb thing for me to say, because almost all of them are my favorites.

This one was pretty much like an issue of Lobo (with the creative team, this is to be expected) filtered through a Howard the Duck lens. The story is one of mass destruction and post-apocalyptic craziness.

Among the characters, we have Ambush Lunatik, a combination of Marvel's Lunatik and DC's Ambush Bug. The other characters, however, are much more recognizable on the Marvel side. Irving Forbush, Gamorra, Beverly, Doctor Bong, Impossible Man, and Millie the Model are all recognizable.

As for the DC side, I do recognize the characters, because I read Lobo back in the 90's. However, I don't remember their names. Most of them weren't kept around.

Still, it was a really fun issue. It actually made me want to go dig out those old Lobo comics and read them again.

"You'll move from a what into a what?"

An idividual cube with four walls to a multi-person pod with no walls.

I have Lobo the Duck but I've never read it. Sounds as if I should give it a try. I think I'll use this discussion as an excuse to read the issues I've never read before.

Yeah, this book is equal parts Lobo and old-school Howard the Duck. I think you'll like it.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

I have Lobo the Duck but I've never read it. Sounds as if I should give it a try. I think I'll use this discussion as an excuse to read the issues I've never read before.

Aagghh! Almost a whole week has gone by since I posted anything in this thread, and my intention was for one a day. Must...rectify...as much...as possible.

Magneto and the Magnetic Men #1

Writer: Gerard Jones

Art: Jeff Matsuda

I really liked this one. It combined Magneto and his Brotherhood of Evil Mutants and the Metal Men from DC. The Metal Men are some of my favorite characters, so this one had me excited from the beginning. Plus, I remember really looking forward to this because of Jeff Matsuda's art, even though, looking back, it is definitely a product of its time. Not sure how it would fly today.

This story had kind of a reversal of sorts. Brothers Erik and Will Magnus (perfect!) had a rivalry going on throughout their lives. Erik had created the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, and as a response, Will created the Sentinels. After the Brotherhood was killed by the Sentinels, Erik created the Magnetic Men as a response in order to continue the fight against the robotic giants.

The results are the following Magnetic Men:

Cobalt (the leader, Lucius Richmond...I assume this is Lucius Fox from DC, and I admit I don't know the Marvel side)

Bismuth: Snapper Jones, and I'll be amazed if this is the only time Snapper Jones (Snapper Carr and Rick Jones) makes an appearance in the Amalgam Universe.

Nickel: Lance Vale, and once again I am at a loss for the Marvel side, but DC is Vicki Vale.

Iron: John Henry Steel, the DCU's Steel. (Iron Man is already half of Iron Lantern, and more attuned to being a star character than part of a team, otherwise this would be a no-brainer.)

Antimony: Debbie Walker. The Marvel side is clearly Patsy walker, but I'm at a loss for who the "Debbie" from DC is.

After being given normal lives and sent on their own way, they are attacked by the Sinister Society (Sinister Six and Society of Super-Villains), and must spring back into action.

This was kind of a quick read, which isn't a bad thing at all. It was light and enjoyable, and not nearly as densely-packed as Kesel's works for Amalgam. If they all were, I would be exhausted after just half an issue's worth of annotating.

The art, as I said, is a product of its time, and Gerard Jones's writing is always enjoyable to read.

It's clear that the teams had such a blast making these issues, and it really pays off to read them.

That's another one I bought but have never read.

Let's see--Marvel's Kyle was most likely Kyle Richmond aka Nighthawk, who at least started out as a Batman analog, so merging with Lucius Fox makes some sense.

I think there used to be an obnoxious reporter named Lance at the Daily Bugle, but at the moment, I'm blanking on his last name.

Debbie was most likely the lead character from one of DC's teen humor titles, Date with Debbie.  I have no idea what that character's last name was either.  Again, she made sense merging with Patsy Walker.



Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man said:

Aagghh! Almost a whole week has gone by since I posted anything in this thread, and my intention was for one a day. Must...rectify...as much...as possible.

Magneto and the Magnetic Men #1

Writer: Gerard Jones

Art: Jeff Matsuda

I really liked this one. It combined Magneto and his Brotherhood of Evil Mutants and the Metal Men from DC. The Metal Men are some of my favorite characters, so this one had me excited from the beginning. Plus, I remember really looking forward to this because of Jeff Matsuda's art, even though, looking back, it is definitely a product of its time. Not sure how it would fly today.

This story had kind of a reversal of sorts. Brothers Erik and Will Magnus (perfect!) had a rivalry going on throughout their lives. Erik had created the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, and as a response, Will created the Sentinels. After the Brotherhood was killed by the Sentinels, Erik created the Magnetic Men as a response in order to continue the fight against the robotic giants.

The results are the following Magnetic Men:

Cobalt (the leader, Lucius Richmond...I assume this is Lucius Fox from DC, and I admit I don't know the Marvel side)

Bismuth: Snapper Jones, and I'll be amazed if this is the only time Snapper Jones (Snapper Carr and Rick Jones) makes an appearance in the Amalgam Universe.

Nickel: Lance Vale, and once again I am at a loss for the Marvel side, but DC is Vicki Vale.

Iron: John Henry Steel, the DCU's Steel. (Iron Man is already half of Iron Lantern, and more attuned to being a star character than part of a team, otherwise this would be a no-brainer.)

Antimony: Debbie Walker. The Marvel side is clearly Patsy walker, but I'm at a loss for who the "Debbie" from DC is.

After being given normal lives and sent on their own way, they are attacked by the Sinister Society (Sinister Six and Society of Super-Villains), and must spring back into action.

This was kind of a quick read, which isn't a bad thing at all. It was light and enjoyable, and not nearly as densely-packed as Kesel's works for Amalgam. If they all were, I would be exhausted after just half an issue's worth of annotating.

The art, as I said, is a product of its time, and Gerard Jones's writing is always enjoyable to read.

It's clear that the teams had such a blast making these issues, and it really pays off to read them.

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