AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. “Once More With…”
There are some interesting threads on this forum, already, covering issues of Marvel’s early series – ‘re-reading’’ of the Avengers and Journey into Mystery/Thor and so on and there was quite a good issue by issue thread on the Invaders around too, until it caught up with the present.
What is more rarely discussed are the later periods when these series were in full flow and while perhaps less iconic still number among them some classics… The examination of the Avengers from #101 onwards gets a credit here.
I therefore present to you an issue by issue critique/discussion forum for one of these mainstay Marvel titles.
Not beginning at the very debut – as others have that covered well – but (and I hope I don’t step on anyone’s creative toes here!) – I would like to pick up the Amazing Spider-Man title after a watershed/bookend issue provided an opportune point at which to begin …
Issue #50 featured that classic moment in Peter Parker’s life when he first thought he couldn’t go on and yet eventually realised he just couldn’t possibly give up being Spidey.
“Spider-Man No More!” draws breath for the title before it races on into it’s next phase – less discussed than the Ditko issues and the early Romita ‘End of the Green Goblin’ stuff the next issue builds on those early foundations and catapults our hero and the title to the second half of it’s first century of publishing and its next phase of greatness…
So, after “Spider-Man No-More!”
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN . “Once More With…”
…”With feeling…!”
Or…
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN . “Once More With…”
…”With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility…!”
Or…
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN . “Once More With…”
…”With in-depth discussion and critique…..
Or…
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN . “Once More With…”
…”With #51 (08/67)…..

Come back soon……

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Judge Dredd was the Punisher re-imagined in a world where he WAS the law, as well as judge, jury and executioner.  In the Marvel color funnybook world (as opposed to the b&w magazines), in the meantime, the Punisher had to wait for the advent of comics shops becoming the main source of comics sales and the CCA becoming essentially meaningless before he could be sold in standard comicbooks as even a hero not playing with a full deck as while the CCA might have let Conan do some bloodletting in a world set in the distant past against other barbarians, monsters and evil wizards, it would have been another thing entirely for a costumed "hero" in the modern world to be going out of his way to execute bad guys, particularly when it couldn't be excused as a matter of either immediate self-defense or preventing the murder of an innocent person.  In the 1960s, the Question could get away with not going out of his way to rescue bad guys who had put themselves in danger through their own misdeeds but to my knowledge in Ditko's stories for Charlton, the Question was never shown purposely or directly killing any bad guys.  And in the wake of Miller's run on Daredevil, in the O'Neil/Byrne story for the 200th issue they felt compelled to distinguish DD from characters like the Punisher and the Question by showing that even when he clearly had good reasons of self-defense to let Bullseye, who was very much a murderer, apparently fall to his death, DD still felt wracked with guilt about it.  

Of course, the point has been brought up with such a stance by characters like Daredevil or Batman of how they can take the guilt when a baddie like Bullseye or the Joker goes on the loose again and goes on yet another killing spree.  There have certainly been real life parallels to that dilemma, but it's more a conceit of popular comics featuring characters that have been around for decades and their most popular rogues who from the '70s onward become ever more vicious, becoming locked in a never-ending cycle of going on murder sprees, captured or apparently dying, then getting loose or magically coming back to life to start the next cycle, like Ralph the Coyote and Sam the Sheepdog in ye olde WB cartoons, clocking in to work to fight all day until the whistle blows, going home to rest then coming back the next day to do it all over again.

Fred W. Hill said:

In the 1960s, the Question could get away with not going out of his way to rescue bad guys who had put themselves in danger through their own misdeeds but to my knowledge in Ditko's stories for Charlton, the Question was never shown purposely or directly killing any bad guys.

When Azrael took over as Batman following Bruce Wayne's back surgery courtesy of Bane, he was portrayed as a merciless type. Like The Question, the worst thing he ever did was let a bad guy fall instead of saving him.

....becoming locked in a never-ending cycle of going on murder sprees, captured or apparently dying, then getting loose or magically coming back to life to start the next cycle, like Ralph the Coyote and Sam the Sheepdog in ye olde WB cartoons, clocking in to work to fight all day until the whistle blows, going home to rest then coming back the next day to do it all over again.

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After Gerry used him in the first few issues of Spectacular Spider-Man, Tarantula appeared in an issue of Captain America not long after and then wasn't used again until Roger Stern brought him back in 1982 in ASM 233.  Stern made it clear he thought the Tarantula was not in Spidey's league at all and has our hero easily manhandle a villain he calls a "second-rater".  A few issues later, Stern mutates him into a spider-like monster (the Brand Corporation tried to give him spider-powers like you know who) and then kills him off.

Gerry Conway returned to Marvel in the late 1980's (after leaving Marvel with SSM #2 in 1977) and one of the first things he does is create a new Tarantula with a similar origin and the same costume - but this guy is given the super-soldier formula too.

And he returned again awhile back to work on Spider-Man again.

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