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Mike Kaluta has a website here. My attention was captured by the Metropolis section. This has images of the illustrations and decorations Kaluta drew for an illustrated edition, and a synopsis by Kaluta that compares the movie to Thea von Harbou's novel. At the end Kaluta notes that more footage from the film might be rediscovered. This has happened since he wrote the article. My hat-tip for the link.

The Metropolis illustrations prompt me to point out that the Dick Tracy newspaper strip currently has a storyline involving a stage production of that very film.

 

Thanks! Many years ago I attended a showing of the film at a rerun cinema. It was a better version than had been available, and they got a terrific crowd. A stage version is so plausible it's almost bound to happen.

This page discusses von Harbou's novel The Indian Tomb and its film versions. Lang worked on the scenario for the silent version and directed a colour version late in his career.

I wonder how Batman would feel about the fact that guys win Oscars for playing the Joker, but no one wins Oscars for playing him?

Like Richard Burton?

The Baron said:

I wonder how Batman would feel about the fact that guys win Oscars for playing the Joker, but no one wins Oscars for playing him?


From "The Man Who Could See Tomorrow", Unusual Tales #7.

A Jack Kirby panel and a Gray Morrow cover, at Martin O'Hearn's blog.

CORRECTION: PANEER  (I don't know how I could have made the mistake!).


Jeff of Earth-J said:

”VENEER” CHEESE: I went to one of those “trendy” grocery stores over the weekend and discovered a cheese I had never heard of before: veneer. I decided to give it a try. I found out later, after I bought it, that it is a kind of cheese popular with vegans. It’s really quite amazing… “amazing” in the sense that it has no flavor (or even taste) whatsoever. I have never eaten anything that tastes like nothing. A quick Google search informs me that “veneer” refers to the kind of wood the cheese is packaged in, which is appropriate because I think the box would have tasted better.

The 1957 MLK Graphic Novel That Inspired Civil Rights Activists

https://www.history.com/news/civil-rights-graphic-novel-mlk-john-le...

I've got a reprint, from my friendly neighborhood comics shop, printed on cheap newsprint just like the old days!

This book was an inspiration to civil rights leader and future U.S. Rep. John Lewis, who, many years later, penned his own three-part graphic novel autobiography series, March.



Richard Willis said:

The 1957 MLK Graphic Novel That Inspired Civil Rights Activists

https://www.history.com/news/civil-rights-graphic-novel-mlk-john-le...

Re where the "Sorry, Wrong Planet" image (p.340) comes from: I've just run into the source by accident. It's from "The Census Taker", Mystery Tales #26  (Marvel, 1955). Art by Mort Lawrence. (I was convinced it was Ditko.)

The History article in my post talks about all this. The comic was important as far as South Africa, where it was banned.

ClarkKent_DC said:

I've got a reprint, from my friendly neighborhood comics shop, printed on cheap newsprint just like the old days!

This book was an inspiration to civil rights leader and future U.S. Rep. John Lewis, who, many years later, penned his own three-part graphic novel autobiography series, March.

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