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Don't tell HIM that! He's kinda grumpy.

Ibis #1 (Fawcett) and Crown Comics #6 (McCombs). As I wrote elsewhere the second cover also reminds me of Ayesha from She standing in the pillar of fire.

From their frequent use in pre-Code horror stories (and quite a few afterward), puppet shows and ventrioloquist acts were once popular. The things you learn from comics.

Ventriloquist dummy stories are a whole horror genre, even just in movies. There's a good early one in the British anthology film Dead of Night (1945).

Come and sit by my side, you who voice me;

Do not hasten to bid me farewell,

But remember the uncanny valley

As I drag your lost soul down to hell.

Captain Comics said:

From their frequent use in pre-Code horror stories (and quite a few afterward), puppet shows and ventrioloquist acts were once popular. The things you learn from comics.

When TV became a big deal everyone thought the movies would die. I think that what died were the previously-popular puppet shows and ventriloquist acts. As a kid I used to watch the Beany and Cecil puppet show on TV, which before long was replaced by an animated version.

The olio acts (little shows put on to entertain people while they set up the big acts) died. This is why the 1976-78 Howdy Doody didn't catch on. Once in awhile somebody tries bringing those things back but audiences don't seem interested anymore.

Has anyone posted this extraordinary, unlicensed (but apparently Gaiman-thumbs-upped) adaptation of a certain dark storyline from The Sandman

"24-Hour Diner"

NSFW

Sandman: 24 Hour Diner from Morpheus on Vimeo.

An Aquaman/Sub-Mariner crossover, three years apart.

The Sub-Mariner was a major Marvel character in the 1970s. Aside from his own title he appeared in The Defenders, Super-Villain Team-Up, and The Invaders.

And yet, never learned to work and play well with others.

Luke Blanchard said:

An Aquaman/Sub-Mariner crossover, three years apart.

The Sub-Mariner was a major Marvel character in the 1970s. Aside from his own title he appeared in The Defenders, Super-Villain Team-Up, and The Invaders.

True, Captain. Namor left the Defenders by #15 and was betrayed by Doctor Doom in SVTU #4, though he should have seen that one coming!

The only reason that he stayed in the Invaders was that there was a war on! And Timely only had three major stars!

Captain Comics said:

And yet, never learned to work and play well with others.

Luke Blanchard said:

An Aquaman/Sub-Mariner crossover, three years apart.

The Sub-Mariner was a major Marvel character in the 1970s. Aside from his own title he appeared in The Defenders, Super-Villain Team-Up, and The Invaders.

It's weird to me that Namor was so popular in the '40s. Does anyone have any theories as to why? '

I don't think he ever attained that level of popularity again -- even in the '70s he was basically a supporting character, the abrasive Hawkeye of whatever team he was on. (As Commander Benson has pointed out, no combat team would allow that sort of personality to hang around and destroy unit cohesiveness, no matter what skills or super-strength he or she brought to the table. I think 1970s and later audiences began to be sophisticated enough to realize that and dislike him.) Even John Byrne couldn't make the character sell.

Theories?

He was an impressively powerful character with a personality, he had an interesting design, he could be used as both hero and antihero, and readers could vicariously enjoy his aggression.

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