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Hmmmmm

Egads

I was wondering when Spider-Man first exhibited spider-sense. It turns out it was when fought the Fantastic Four in the second story in The Amazing Spider-Man #1. His "spider-instinct" alerts him to danger as the Invisible Girl prepares to rope him from behind.

The element is used recurringly in the story. The Chameleon sends Spider-Man a message he hears by his "spider senses" as part of his plot to frame him. Later Spider-Man uses his "spider senses" to detect the location of the Chameleon's helicopter. When the Chameleon disguises himself as a policeman Spider-Man's "supernatural spider's instincts" warn him he's nearby. And when he turns off the lights Spider-Man can still "sense" him (but he seems to figure out which of the policemen is the Chameleon by which one leaves the group).

This post has an image of an interesting Fantastic Four cover John Byrne drew for Back Issue.

Franklin's interactions with his "Uncle" Ben are sadly missed today. Ben was more of an uncle to Franklin than Johnny, his actual uncle.

Who was Spider-Man's first girlfriend? It was Betty Brant, right?

Arguably, it was Liz. Early in the Amazing Fantasy #15 story Peter asks a girl called Sally out, and she turns him down flat. The splash and subsequent panels have a girl who looks like Liz but isn't named. She appears in school scenes in The Amazing Spider-Man #1-#3.

She's first named in #4. She has a date with Peter, and gets angry when he breaks it (to look for the Sandman; his excuse is he has to study). She wonders where Peter is when Spider-Man is fighting the Sandman. She shows her anger again when Peter tries to reinstate the date. She is contemptuous when he nearly fights Flash but then backs off. And she criticises Flash's rude parting shot.

A secretary is seen in #2 when Peter sells his first photos, of the Vulture, to Jameson. She could be Betty, but she has glasses. Betty is really introduced as a character in #4, in the scene where Jameson discovers Spider-Man has left webbing on his chair. She asks Peter to take in his replacement trousers.

Betty's full name is established in #5. Peter thinks he's never noticed how pretty she is, so a romance between them was now envisioned. Liz appears but is not shown to be interested in Peter.

In #6 there's another scene of Betty and Peter interacting. Liz is comically wowed when Spider-Man rescues her at the museum. At the end Peter rings her up for a date, and she turns him down because she's hoping Spider-Man will call.

A couple of other things:

When May gives Peter Uncle Ben's camera in the Vulture story in #2 (p.3 panel 3) there's a photo of Uncle Ben in the foreground.

Jameson first appears in the first story #1. The story represents him as the publisher of the Daily Bugle. Peter starts selling him photos in the Vulture story in #2, but there he's represented as the publisher of a magazine called Now. In #3 he's back to being the publisher of the Daily Bugle.

In #1 Jameson is Spider-Man's persecutor, like General Ross in the Hulk's series. His hostility is unreasonable: Spider-Man saves his son, and he still won't give him credit. The trousers sequence in #4 is the first one where he's treated comically.

I don't think you can call Liz his girlfriend since IIRC they never spent any real time together and a date didn't happen. They were both curious about each other but nothing happened.

Betty was the girl he had when I started reading (ASM #9). I'm not sure what is canon, but some time early on fans were questioning how much of an age difference there was. I think at one point they said that Betty didn't finish high school for some reason and had to  join the workforce. At the point they started flirting and dating Peter was, I believe, between 16 and 17. 

In some places, you could complete your secretarial requirements while still in your teens, so it could be that sort of situation.

Famously, the Beatles's secretary, Freda Kelly,  was just 17 when she was hired.

Richard Willis said:

I don't think you can call Liz his girlfriend since IIRC they never spent any real time together and a date didn't happen. They were both curious about each other but nothing happened.

Betty was the girl he had when I started reading (ASM #9). I'm not sure what is canon, but some time early on fans were questioning how much of an age difference there was. I think at one point they said that Betty didn't finish high school for some reason and had to  join the workforce. At the point they started flirting and dating Peter was, I believe, between 16 and 17. 


I don't claim to be an expert on this, but I think that in the UK students finish what the US calls high school when they are 16, not 18, so she could have finished school, just not higher education. 

JD DeLuzio said:

In some places, you could complete your secretarial requirements while still in your teens, so it could be that sort of situation.

Famously, the Beatles's secretary, Freda Kelly,  was just 17 when she was hired.

IIRC, it was established in the first Doc Ock two-parter (Amazing Spider-Man #11-12) that Betty quit school to support her brother. She was supposed to be a contemporary of Peter Parker. I don't know what the child labor laws were in New York in 1962, but I guess it's possible she could have been hired at 16. If she was particularly mature-looking, she could have lied about her age.

Brian Cronin has an article here on whether it's true Captain America first threw his shield in a text story Stan Lee wrote in Captain America Comics #3. He holds it is, but I think he misses a point. Apparently, Cap first threw his shield in a comics story in the next issue. Lee was working at Marvel, so he could have seen the story before it was printed and imitated the idea.

The other thing is Cap doesn't just throw his shield: he bounces it off things and it ricochets back to him, and he can throw it so it returns to him like a boomerang. I'm not in a position to say when he first started doing that. It wouldn't surprise me if he never did it before the Silver Age, and the idea was subconsciously inspired by Thor's control over his hammer. But they did come up with cool stuff in the Golden Age, so it could be a Golden Age thing. It does ricochet off the guy Cap throws it at on the #4 page Cronin reproduces.

Another thing: in the Silver Age, and in Kirby's run in the 1970s, Cap could also use his shield to slice things. Sometimes he threw the shield so it sliced through guns. I don't know if he ever did that in the Golden Age either. But for that matter, I can't recall seeing that in the 70s/80s outside Kirby's stories.

I had a look at the one story I have from the mid 50s revival to see if he bounced his shield there. That's the story from Men's Adventures #28 reprinted in Marvel Super-Heroes #12. (I have that issue in an Australian B&W digest reprint.) To my surprise, he has the shield in the splash panel, but not in the story.

If you haven’t heard by now, a lot of people got this invitation, including me and a lot of the people on my Facebook feed. Undoubtedly a scam.

PowerBook Pete, the Mad Mod said:

Why would the mayor of Carmel, Indiana, send me a LinkedIn invitation?

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