I seem to remember that every year DC would publish a " spot the mistake story "
Is that right ? Am I getting too old ?

Thank you again for your sharing with others about a great time in our lives.

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Mr. Age wrote: Steve Ditko would've been great, but it makes me laugh just to think about him drawing it.

Ditko drawing a comic book about the hippie generation is wrong in so many ways that he would, in fact, have been the *perfect* choice to draw BPTG. That would've been comic book gold!

Dave Blanchard said:

Wouldn't it be accurate to say that every Silver Age issue of Wonder Woman qualifed as an April Fools story, in that the joke was inevitably on the reader who shelled out 10 or 12 pennies to read that thing?

Any comic priced 10, 12 or 15 cents in the '60s was worth it, if you ask me. There was a fugdicle that cost me as much that and made me fall horribly ill--I certainly wish I'd never bought it. Reading comics helped me recover.

I'll submit SUPERMAN'S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN 100 (March '67) as a worthy example of DC's dedication to comic mayhem. Also "Superman's Unluckiest Day," in SUPERMAN'S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN 106 (October '67), mines similar territory.

Hoy Murphy said:

I recall reading somewhere, and it may have just been speculation, that DC canceled Brother Power after only two issues because some of the other editors didn't like that their company was publishing a "hippie comic book."

Carmine Infantino said in this interview Mort Weisinger had it killed. According to Joe Orlando, in this interview, Simon had put the first issue together before he was assigned to be its editor. The covers strike me as good, but judging by the extracts I've seen, don't match what the comic was like inside. This makes me wonder if the covers sold the first two issues and sales would've otherwise dropped off as readers discovered the mismatch.

Neal Adams did do issues of Adventures of Jerry Lewis and The Adventures of Bob Hope.

Canadian market stickers?

That's a possibility, I suppose, although I don't remember hearing that happened. More likely it was tests by distributors to see how it affected sales .

 For some oddity such as the comics vending machines

I don't think vending machines would need them, as the machine would be set up for 12 or 15 cents. Individually pricing each comic would be a waste of time. At least, that's the way I understand the machines--I never saw one, which is probably good. The combination of all those comics covers and the element of gambling and determining the comic next in line would've mesmerized me for hours.

I think it has been pointed out that BPTG is rather strong a criticism of the hippie subculture

It had both good and bad hippies, and BP encouraged hippies to get jobs, but then he was shot into space by a crooked businessman, so it's a mixed bag. Here's how Wikipedia describes this epic tale (I wasn't about to pull mine out and reread them):

"Shortly after his creation, Brother Power was kidnapped by the "Psychedelic Circus". The freaks in the Freakshow at the "Psychedelic Circus" were all based on the styles of "Big Daddy" Ed Roth and Harvey Kurtzman,, both of whom were good friends of Simon. After escaping, he was fixed up and given a face by another hippie named Cindy, and attempted to run for United States Congress.

"His misadventures with the establishment led to finding work and encouraging other hippies to do so, eventually getting hired by the J.P. Acme Corporation just as it was taken over by the wicked Lord Sliderule. Brother Power's ingenuity still made the assembly line run more efficiently. Brother Power was last seen being shot into space on orders from Governor Ronald Reagan, after trying to prevent the sabotage of a rocket launch by Mad Dawg and his gang, knowing it would be blamed on hippies."

You can't make this stuff up.

-- MSA

I never picked up BPTG. I was going to say that Ditko would have presented Brother Power as a Question/Mr. A character. Good hippies? He wouldn't have had any. From what I read, it sounds like it was just as extreme in the other direction.

Those prices stickers ring a bell, but I can't remember where I've seen them. I don't think it was an exclusively Canadian thing. At that time, in our province, there was no tax on comic books (a fact that always stunned my father, each time I got him to buy a comic for me)--and comics sold for the regular cover price. There may have been taxes in other provinces--but the notion was that you shouldn't tax reading (a philosophy that later governments omitted from their credo). I believe the Canadian dollar was worth more in the '60s--it started to drop in the '70s, when eventually there was dual pricing on comics and price stickers were added in some shops. Mind you, some paperback books in the '60s had stickers over the American price--charging a higher Canadian price--but those books were sold in bookstores, not mom and pop shops. I have a hunch that those 15 cent stickers were added to comics which were not sold at newsstands, but sold at department stores.

Okay, I'm wrong. Checking the facts, I find that the Canadian dollar dropped for most of the '60s to around 92 cents (it had been above the American dollar for most of the '50s). It rose above the US buck in the early '70s, but fell down down down starting in '76 until it reached 70 cents in '86--after which it rose rose rose and then fell fell to nearly 60 cents in '98 and in 2002, before rallying thereafter. So the lower Canuck buck in the '60s might've motivated some retailers to raise the price to make up the shortfall.

 the notion was that you shouldn't tax reading 

There's no tax on newspapers and magazines in Illinois to this day. It's always been considered an infringement of freedom of the press, which is a Constitutional no-no. Comic books count in that, too, but books don't. So you can buy individual issues off the spinner at cover price but you have to pay tax on the TPB collection. I don't know if that's true in other states--as you note, it can depend on the state over time.

-- MSA

On another thread I commented that in California periodicals (newspapers and magazines) and candy used to be free of sales tax. Interestingly, if a comic was an "Annual" or "Special" it was taxable because it wasn't a periodical. Anything that was published daily-weekly-monthly was tax free. When DC changed its special large issues to be part of the numerical run of a comic then they stopped being taxable. At a later date, they changed the law so that periodicals (even newspapers) were taxable along with candy. The only purchases that are still not taxable are groceries.

Maybe that's why DC's annuals became 80-page Giants and Marvel's annuals became King-Size Specials.

Hoy

Richard Willis said:

On another thread I commented that in California periodicals (newspapers and magazines) and candy used to be free of sales tax. Interestingly, if a comic was an "Annual" or "Special" it was taxable because it wasn't a periodical. Anything that was published daily-weekly-monthly was tax free. When DC changed its special large issues to be part of the numerical run of a comic then they stopped being taxable. At a later date, they changed the law so that periodicals (even newspapers) were taxable along with candy. The only purchases that are still not taxable are groceries.

Mr Age said,

"His misadventures with the establishment led to finding work and encouraging other hippies to do so, eventually getting hired by the J.P. Acme Corporation just as it was taken over by the wicked Lord Sliderule. Brother Power's ingenuity still made the assembly line run more efficiently. Brother Power was last seen being shot into space on orders from Governor Ronald Reagan, after trying to prevent the sabotage of a rocket launch by Mad Dawg and his gang, knowing it would be blamed on hippies."

You can't make this stuff up.

-- MSA

You and I can't but somebody obviously did :)

Andy

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