"'Cause they taped it on only one day..." - NBC's The Sound of Music

...The NBC-TV remake of Rogers & Hammerstein's THE SOUND OF MUSIC as a " live play " production's airing is about one month in the past now , and I meant to post about it here before that ! But I didn't...

  With 18 million viewers IIRC , it certainly qualified as " a hit " . NBC even repeated it a week-and-a-halfish later .

  I saw it both times:-) .

  It was meant to be a " TV play/live production " in the mode of the PLAYHOUSE 90/BELL TELEPHONE HOURs of yore , NBC claiming " For the first time in fifty years..." . I , myself , on the West Coast of the continguous 48 states of the USA (California) saw it as an immediate taped repeat , anyway , being 3 time zones to the west of the Eastern Time Zone , where it would have indeed shown live ~ along with the Central Time Zone .

  The Mountain Time Zone , especially for such a " holiday special " as this , I am not so sure about . Anyone ?????

  Has it shown outside of the U.S,. yet ~ I know we have Australian and Canadian residents here , others ???

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..." Originated " re Jennifer/Patrick , was the word I was looking for above . I sowwy !
..." Dirty Dancing "arts in just a few minutes on the East Coast , USA , though I'm on the West Coast .

On April 1, NBC is airing a live production of Jesus Christ Superstar. I first saw this on stage in 1972 in London visiting my family. I recommend it to anyone who hasn't seen it. I took my mother to the stage production and she would have had a problem if it was sacrilegious. The main players are Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene. I think it gives a clear picture of the politics that surrounded Jesus' crucifixion, and is accessible to viewers of all (or no) religious persuasion.

http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/jesus-christ-superstar-live-in-conc...

I've heard it said that Jesus Christ Superstar is the most faithful rendition of the Christ story. I don't remember where I read that, as I understand critical reaction was mostly positive but not that positive, and the play and movie drew their share of complaints about being irreligious if not blasphemous.

Still, I think that observation holds water if one takes the view that the Christ story should be related in ways to reach people in contemporary times.

I'm looking forward to it; I was sold when I heard John Legend was the title character.

...NBC gas announced their latest live musical remake, one of HAIR. It does seem that, after doing a Rogers & Hammerstein show for the first in the franchise, the networks have done more " modern ", somewhat more rock-bases, musicals - Of course, HAIR is fifty - fifty-one?? - years old!!!!!!!!! 

  Anyway, the have stayed away from musicals of the " classic ", mid-Twentieth Century, period - No Gershwin's or Porter or Loesser...Granted, maybe the rights are too expensive? They're seen as too " old "/older-demographic-appealing? For a borderline of " modern " musical that never had a film version and I've never seen, Bacharach/David's PROMISES, PROMISES comes to mind.

I doubt the cost of the rights is an issue for any of the productions NBC or any of these networks want to put on. I think it purely a guess, or a calculation, of what might prove popular with TV viewers, and I'm sure they're all studying the results from each one to choose what to do next, and how.

One lesson learned: Things like The Sound of Music and Peter Pan Live = old and boring.

...So the pre-rock era PETER PAN didn't do well?

There were two different reworkings/adaptations of Peter Pan done on Broadway in the post-WWOO years or so, the one which had Mary Martin and was an early MTV perennial had been the less successful of the two, that's why TV rights were sold then. Was the one done by NBC in this century that Peter Pan adaptation or another one? I'll try and find out.

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...So the pre-rock era PETER PAN didn't do well?

There were two different reworkings/adaptations of Peter Pan done on Broadway in the post-WWOO years or so, the one which had Mary Martin and was an early MTV perennial had been the less successful of the two, that's why TV rights were sold then. Was the one done by NBC in this century that Peter Pan adaptation or another one? I'll try and find out.

As noted above, the producers speak to why they thought Peter Pan Live! was a flop:

Zadan: We're not so slaphappy to jump in and pick a title because that's what we did when we came off the success off Sound of Music and went into Peter Pan. What we didn't know about Peter Pan — and there was no way to know this — was that Peter Pan, as a piece, has overstayed its welcome. What we discovered, too late of course, is that people aren't interested in Peter Pan. As evidenced by the fact that the Peter Pan movie [Pan] that came out a couple months ago — that cost $150 million — disappeared after one weekend. Clearly, this idea of Peter Pan being a viable story right now is not the case. As a result of that, we made a mistake in choosing it and I don't think we should jump on something; we should think it through and figure out what the next choice should be in the progression of "what do you follow The Wiz with so we can keep moving forward and not backward?"

...The PETER PAN that was on TV twice was the most successful of the two post-War ones, the one with the " I Won't Grow Up " song, I guess/IIRC now.à qq

From TVLine: "Craig Zadan, Producer of NBC's Live Musicals, Dead at 69"

Along with [Neil] Meron, Zadan produced NBC’s The Sound of Music Live! in 2013, starting a run of live musical productions for the network that ran up to this year’s Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert. Zadan also served as an executive producer on NBC’s scripted Broadway drama Smash, as well as several editions of the Academy Awards on ABC. On the big screen, Zadan’s productions included the Oscar-winning 2002 musical Chicago, the 2007 musical version of Hairspray and 2011’s Footloose remake (as well as the 1984 original).

Musicals, remakes of which I wouldn’t mind seeing …

Brigadoon

The play is nice fantasy, but the MGM film of 1954 is pretty bad unless you like endless dancing.

Damn Yankees

The 1958 Warner Bros. film is clumsy and flat, except when Gwen Verdon is on screen. Should be re-done, but must be set in the 1950s!

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

The 1966 film is one of my favorite film comedies, but it retained only a few songs from the play. I’ve seen the stage version: it’s properly zany in its own right, and the other songs are okay.

Man of La Mancha

A really moving play, but the 1972 film version has (except for Ian Richardson) a cast that cannot sing, and they famously dubbed Peter O’Toole with a guy who’s just as bad as he in this regard; and they trimmed the songs unconscionably. Withersoever, it blows! Must be done properly some time.

Paint Your Wagon comes to mind. The film is radically different from the play, but I’m not sure the original version would play well today.

South Pacific, Camelot, Phantom of the Opera … already recently re-done, so they get a pass.

A TV version of Brigadoon appeared in 1966. Robert Goulet played Tommy and Sally Ann Howes played Fiona. Peter Falk played Jeff.

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