Want to know where something is or what it looks like inside? Comics usually oblige, sooner or later, because they know how much we love maps, cutaways and diagrams.

The blog Comic Book Cartography was brought to my attention, and I think it's pretty cool. Many of these will be familiar, and a bunch are just odd diagrams of no lasting note.But I'd never seen the map of Little Archie's neighborhood or the 1952 Life map of Pogo's swamp in particular. I'm going to have to spend some time looking through them.

-- MSA.

Views: 627

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Actually, no matter how hard we try subconsciously we know both Metropolis and Gotham were take-offs on New York.

Which means the DC Earth (whatever number you give it) has two New Yorks. And they're in different places. Their maps would look pretty weird to us.

They were both meant to represent New York when Superman and Batman were independently created over seven decades ago. There were no alternate earths in those stories.

Shortly thereafter the Golden Age Green Lantern was also set in Gotham City. As far as I know he and Batman didn't meet until the Silver Age.

Batman showed up a couple of times in All-Star, but that might have been during the time Green Lantern and Flash had left the Justice Society. Superman, Batman, and the rest were supposed to live in alternate earths where they were the only hero, but that idea stopped working once the JSA came out. All-Star#3 states Superman and Batman were supposed to be there but were busy (no doubt because everybody else was telling stories and laughing at the Red Tornado.) I believe Ma Hunkle was stated to live in the same city as Green Lantern but I think they only met in All-Star#3.

Richard Willis said:

Actually, no matter how hard we try subconsciously we know both Metropolis and Gotham were take-offs on New York.

Michael Fleischer's Batman and Superman encyclopedias bear this out. Most all of New York's most famous landmarks are represented in both Gotham City and Metropolis, including the Empire State Building, Grand Central Terminal, the New York Public Library, and even the Statue of Liberty!

Denny O'Neil suggested Metropolis is Manhattan, full of gleaming skyscrapers, where Gotham City is the grimy, dingy boroughs.

Ron M. said:

Which means the DC Earth (whatever number you give it) has two New Yorks. And they're in different places. Their maps would look pretty weird to us.

I think that accounts for the moment in the JLA/Avengers crossover where Superman scans the Earths and notes that the DC Universe Earth is bigger than the Marvel Universe Earth. It would have to be, since it includes both a Gotham City and a New York (or, if you prefer, a Gotham City and a Chicago), a Metropolis and a New York, a Coast City and a Los Angeles, a Star City and a Seattle, etc., and so forth.

That explains Superman meeting Spider-Man. If you assume they live in the same world (and that first meeting did) then they should have met long before then and been used to running into each other. And JJ and Perry White would be fighting for the same subscribers.

Mr. Silver Age said:

The notion that Gotham City is Chicago goes back further than that.

It does, but that's the most recent example. No doubt Kane was influenced by Dick Tracy, which helped make Batman so iconic. But the notion that Dick Tracy fought odd guys by day and Batman fought others by night, and never the twain did meet, seems a bit implausible. More likely, the DCU Dick Tracy is in New York, where there are virtually no superheroes to get in his way.

I don't think that's any more implausible than the Marvel Universe notion that most of the superheroes live and operate in New York, and most of villains still live and operate in New York too, knowing most of the superheroes live and operate in New York.

Superman should be even more powerful on Marvel Earth than DC Earth then, since Marvel Earth, being smaller, would have lower gravity.

Ron M. said:

That explains Superman meeting Spider-Man. If you assume they live in the same world (and that first meeting did) then they should have met long before then and been used to running into each other. And JJ and Perry White would be fighting for the same subscribers.

Inter-company crossovers either are based on the premise that there has to be some dimesion-threatening cosmic hoo-hah to allow the characters from one comics universe to meet the other ... or are based on the premise that they're all on the same world and simply have never met before.

E. Nelson Bridwell took the latter view, that there was a lot happening between the panels that the readers never got to see (like Dick Tracy at work in Gotham City Chicago during the day, and Batman at work in Chicago Gotham City at night).

It would have been interesting seeing Tracy hunting down "that weird vigilante that dresses like a giant bat!"

And Lois Lane followed him?

She must have.

Being Earth-2 they moved to the Daily Star, not the Planet.

And then to the Planet (although he first worked for the Planet in the comic strip, and they probably wanted to make it consistent after that). Clark seemed to move around several times early in his Earth-2 career until he finally landed at the Planet. That's not unusual--reporters out of school often start at small papers, even weekly suburban or small-town ones, and work their way up to the Bigs.

On Earth-1, he seems to have gone right from college to the Planet. Nice work if you can get it.

Supposedly, the Daily Star was named for the Toronto Daily Star, and Joe Shuster modeled the building after the real Star's building, as he was a paperboy there as a kid.

So maybe that's the key to the DCU's land--There is no Canada! All your North America belong to U.S.! That gives them plenty of land to spread out and have a NY, Metropolis and Gotham.

Granted, in Superman #200, Kal-El's baby brother wins the right to be Superman and Kal moves to Canada to become their hero, but that was an Imaginary Story, for which they must've invented a Canada.

-- MSA

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service