Want to know where something is or what it looks like inside? Comics usually oblige, sooner or later, because they know how much we love maps, cutaways and diagrams.

The blog Comic Book Cartography was brought to my attention, and I think it's pretty cool. Many of these will be familiar, and a bunch are just odd diagrams of no lasting note.But I'd never seen the map of Little Archie's neighborhood or the 1952 Life map of Pogo's swamp in particular. I'm going to have to spend some time looking through them.

-- MSA.

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Didn't Earth-2 Superman end up back at the Daily Star during the Silver Age to show he wasn't identical to his Earth-1 version? I think they even mentioned Editor George Taylor at some point.

Mr. Silver Age said:

So maybe that's the key to the DCU's land--There is no Canada! All your North America belong to U.S.! That gives them plenty of land to spread out and have a NY, Metropolis and Gotham.

I'm looking forward to the reactions you get from some of the Legionaires. ;-)

If we're Legionaires, does that mean I get to pick a costume and powers?

At some point, it was decided that most of the various elements that were no longer canon on Earth-1 were still the status quo on Earth-2, so that Kal-L had always worked at the Daily Star, where George Taylor had been the editor until Clark himself go the job, and Clark had never been Superboy, despite the fact that the Daily Planet, Perry White, and Superboy were all in place during the 1940s.  Oddly enough, I don't think they ever established whether or not Earth-2 Kryptonians lose their powers under a red sun, since the whole yellow sun thing didn't come into being until the early 1960s.  I am pretty sure that the never showed any other "flavors" of kryptonite on Earth-2--that is, no matter what color a given piece of kryptonite was (the first piece Kal-L encountered was being used as a fake ruby in Swami Rivers turban), it had the same effect on Superman that green "K" had on Earth-1, and no equivalents to Red "K" or Gold "K" seemed to exist there.

Other than the Earth-2 Two-Face being Harvey Kent instead of Harvey Dent, and Alfred's last name being Beagle instead of Pennyworth, there wasn't a lot of difference between the Earth-1 & Earth-2 Batmen.  I was disappointed that, when the Earth-2 Alfred finally made an appearance, he was in his more familiar thin design, as opposed to the original shorter, wider version, since having a chunky butler was as close as the Earth-2 Bruce Wayne could have gotten to working at the Daily Star for decades...

Ron M. said:

Didn't Earth-2 Superman end up back at the Daily Star during the Silver Age to show he wasn't identical to his Earth-1 version? I think they even mentioned Editor George Taylor at some point.

Pretty sure there was no Earth-1 Etta Candy.

How long was he short and fat? Did the two Alfreds ever meet?


Ron M. said:

Pretty sure there was no Earth-1 Etta Candy.

Actually, there was.

Wonder Woman # 98 (May, 1958) and its story within, "The Million Dollar Penny", is generally considered the benchmark for the adventures of the Earth-One Amazing Amazon.  "The Million Dollar Penny" presents a new origin for Wonder Woman, one that is essentially the same as that of the Golden-Age version, but with some distinct differences which keeps it from being simply a re-hash of the earlier story.  The principal difference is that there are no references to World War II and the jet aircraft flown by Steve Trevor clearly puts the events in the then-modern day.

Another significant difference is that Diana does not meet Trevor until after she wins the Amazon competition to determine which of them will venture into Man's World as Wonder Woman.

Then the following issue carries the tale, "Top Secret", which depicts Wonder Woman assuming her identity as Diana Prince for the first time and becoming an Army officer with Military Intelligence.

So clearly we're dealing with the Earth-One Amazon Princess by now.

This Wonder Woman meets Etta Candy and the other Holliday Girls (Tina Toy, Thelma Tall, Lita Little) in "Fantastic Fishermen of the Forbidden Sea", from Wonder Woman # 117 (Oct., 1960).

Etta and the girls make further appearances in issues 119 (Jan., 1961) and # 121 (Apr., 1961) and # 127 (Jan., 1962) before Robert Kanigher decided they weren't as popular as their Golden-Age incarnations and hied them off to Mandyville.

Hope this helps.


Dave Elyea said:

I was disappointed that, when the Earth-2 Alfred finally made an appearance, he was in his more familiar thin design, as opposed to the original shorter, wider version . . . .



Certainly, as you pointed out, once the whole business of Supermen and Batmen on both Earth-One and Earth-Two was established, DC went back and took some of the discarded elements in both their histories and "revived" them as items which distinguished the Earth-Two versions of the characters.

These were all things that changed without an in-continuity explanation.  It was The Daily Star in one issue, The Daily Planet, the next.  First, Martha Wayne died of a gunshot, like her husband; then, she died of a weak heart which gave out after seeing her husband murdered.  These and the like were simply changes that "happened"---writer's error; poor memory, failure to research, whatever.

But DC couldn't simply reëstablish that the Earth-Two Alfred, Mr. Beagle, was rotund and clean-shaven---because his alteration to a svelte, moustachioed fellow was not one of those writer's-error oversights.  His change in appearance was actually addressed in the fictional conceit of the series.

Alfred the Butler debuted in "Here Comes Alfred!", from Batman # 16 (Apr.-May, 1943) as a smooth-faced, round-bellied sort, and that's the way he was portrayed for the next several months.

Then, in "Accidentally on Purpose", from Detective Comics # 83 (Jan., 1944), Alfred returns from his vacation in such a state that the Batman and Robin don't recognise him.  Their gentleman's gentleman explains that he felt his fat, jowly appearance was not in keeping with the dignity of a man of Bruce Wayne's stature.  So he used his vacation time to attend a fat farm and lost his excess poundage through proper diet and strenuous exercise,  The moustache, he grew to accentuate the elegance of his new physique.

With an in-story reason provided, it would have been difficult for DC to state that the Earth-Two Alfred was still roly-poly.  You can bet that someone would have dredged up "Accidentally on Purpose" and demanded to know why that story was being tossed out.

I know that Etta Candy was in several issues of Wonder Woman in the early 80s but she wasn't a major character anymore.

The change in Alfred was done so he could resemble the actor playing him in the first Batman movie serial.


Philip Portelli said:

The change in Alfred was done so he could resemble the actor playing him in the first Batman movie serial.

Reputedly.  I've never heard or seen anything which established it definitively.  But thanks for reminding me of that, Philip; I meant to put it in my post above.

Yes, the actor portraying Alfred in the 1943 serial, Batman---William Austin---was tall and thin and wore a moustache.  The generally accepted belief is that DC changed the appearance of its four-colour Alfred to conform to the film version.

If the movie serial really had nothing to do with the change in Alfred (and yes there is no actual proof), you must admit that it would have been one heck of a coincidence!

It seems apparent they did it, but it's interesting that they did. Either they saw that version and thought that looked better and had more possibility, or they didn't want movie-goers surprised to see a radically different Alfred when they sought out a comic. There actually could have been a correlation between going to movies and buying comics of those characters back then, as the two primary types of entertainment for that age group. There certainly hasn't been one for a long time.

-- MSA

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