Deck Log Entry # 227 The Silver-Age Challenge---the Legion of Super-Heroes Edition II . . . Answers!

I expected a Legion quiz to get a robust response, and you fellows didn't disappoint.  Lots of lively speculation on the possible right answers and, in at least two cases, answers other than the ones I intended, but had to rule them correct.  We'll get to those in due time.

 

As most of you know, I don't indulge in trick questions.  No "How many months have twenty-eight days?" stuff because the idea is to test your Silver-Age knowledge, not to outwit you with semantics.  That doesn't mean that you don't have to consider the wording.  I choose my words carefully, mostly to avoid confusion, but sometimes for other purposes.  I do set up certain questions expecting (or, perhaps, hoping) the players leap to a particular---and particularly wrong---response.

 

Most of you didn't fall for any of the snares I designed in this year's challenge, though there was some dissention over what the not-so-obvious correct responses were.  And there was one which stumped absolutely no-one.

 

On the other hand, one of the more straightforward questions, nobody got right.  (Although one of you came so very close, just one name too many.)  That hasn't happened since my Superman quiz back in 2014.  That's how sharp you guys are.

 

Perhaps the thing which makes the Legion of Super-Heroes so popular, both for the quizmaster and the quiz-takers, is that, even limited to the Silver Age, the series had a rich, expansive history.  Unlike other DC series of the time, the Legion experienced actual and constant development.  Legionnaires were added, expelled, killed, maimed, and transformed.  They were involved in romantic relationships.  They had parents and family.  Occasionally, a character from one of their backgrounds, decent or criminal, would pop up.

 

Not only did the series have depth, it had breadth.  Even taking Superboy/man out of consideration, there wasn't a title edited by Mort Weisinger that the Legion didn't touch.  In Superboy, Legionnaires made sporadic guest appearances, and when they didn't, there was always Lana Lang (Legion Reservist) and Pete Ross (honorary Legionnaire) to remind you of the Super-Hero Club.  Jimmy Olsen, also an honorary member, regularly appeared in his own title, plus Superman and Lois Lane and Action Comics, where full-fledged Legionnaire, Supergirl, occupied the back-up feature.  The Composite Superman received the powers of twenty Legionnaires from a set of their statuettes, enabling him to kick the asses of Superman and Batman in two memorable issues of World's Finest Comics.

 

That allowed for a treasure trove of Legion lore, eagerly soaked up by the fans and capitalised upon by writers of trivia quizzes.  Consider:  I've done two Silver-Age challenges on the Legion of Super-Heroes; yet, I've never done one on my favourite Silver-Age series, the Justice League of America.

 

O.K., enough blather.  It's time to reveal how you folks did.  I'll reserve the one that everybody missed until last just to keep the interest.

 

 

 

1.  Who was the first non-charter member of the Legion of Substitute Heroes?

 

This was one of my replacement questions and the one I liked because of its "Hey, I didn't know that!" factor.  Color Kid is set up as the obvious answer, but Fraser Sherman and Peter Wrexham weren't fooled.  They both knew that Dream Girl was the first non-charter member of the Substitute Heroes.

 

Philip Portelli went with Color Kid, but he allowed that there might be some blurring over the exact order of the next three Subs to join after the original five.  That might be why Luis Otavio de Moura Dantas went with Star Boy.  But the order of joining is evident, if one looks at panel two of the last page of "The Legionnaire Who Killed, from Adventure Comics # 342 (Mar., 1966).

 

There we see Dream Girl leading Star Boy to the Substitute Heroes' space cruiser, while stating, "I joined the Legion of Substitute Heroes . . . and I and they want you to join, too, Star Boy!"

 

So clearly, Dream Girl joined before Star Boy.  And how do we know that she also joined before Color Kid?  If you look at that same panel, which I've helpfully provided, you see the Substitute Heroes waiting by their ship---and there's just five of them.  The original five.  No Color Kid.

 

Color Kid was probably still drowning his sorrows in a Martian milk shake at the Interplanetary Soda Shoppe.

 

 

2.  Who is the leader of the Legion Espionage Squad and which Legionnaires are permanently assigned to the squad?

 

Everybody knew that Chameleon Boy was the leader of the Espionage Squad.  I made that part of the question only because I've actually seen statements on other sites that (incorrectly) insisted that Invisible Kid was the leader of the Squad.

 

But only one of you knew precisely which other Legionnaires were permanently assigned to the Espionage Squad---Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Saturn Girl, and Phantom Girl.  That was Peter, who also provided the references:  Cham was established as the Squad's leader in a "Know Your Legionnaires" text piece in Adventure Comics # 329 (Feb., 1965); the answer to a letter published in the Legion Outpost in Adventure Comics # 347 (Aug., 1966) established which Legionnaires were permanently assigned to the Squad.

 

Incidentally, while some of you named other Legionnaires, Peter was the only one to include Saturn Girl on his list.

 

 

3.  On what 20th-century television programme did the Legion make a guest appearance?

 

I figured most of you would get this one right.  Fraser, Philip, Prince Hal, and my old pal, Eric Sofer, the Silver-Age Fogey, did.  It is, indeed, Our American Heroes.  In Action Comics # 309 (Feb., 1964), the Legion travelled back to the twentieth century on the evening when an episode of the show honoured Superman. The reason I felt it could be tricky was because I thought somebody might mistake the title of the story itself---"The Superman Super-Spectacular"---as the name of the television programme.

 

4.  On what world is Element Lad's super-power viewed as criminal and results in planetary banishment?

 

Fraser, Phil, Prince Hal, and Eric certainly know the corollary details about the Legion.  In "The Legion of Super-Villains", from Superman # 147 (Aug., 1961), Cosmic King revealed how he acquired his power of transmutation of elements.  Unfortunately, he was a native of Venus, a world that considers such a power as evil, and he was banished from it.  Even though it never came up in a Legion story, Element Lad possesses the same power and one would assume he would receive the same treatment from the Venusians.

 

6.  Excluding the Adult Legion stories, name all of the Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones.

 

This was one of the lesser questions that I had to substitute at the last minute.  It was awkward to write because I had to exclude all the boy-to-man and girl-to-woman name changes that arose in the Adult Legion tales.  And also I thought it was a bit too easy.  There was only one permanent name change that might be not easily remembered.  Yet, as it turned out, that wasn't the tough part for any of you.

 

Still, I should have written that question just a little better, as we will quickly see.

 

The ones who get credit for getting the question right are Peter and Randomnole, who correctly named Mystery Lad/Element Lad and Lightning Lass/Light Lass and Triplicate Girl/Duo Damsel.  Yes, I know they both added a fourth name; I'll be getting to that.

I purposefully added the word "permanently" to the question to avoid all those brief-lived names that Legionnaires took on, usually for one story.  That let out many of the ones that Eric named.

 

Philip, Luis, Prince Hal, and Eric included Lone Wolf/Timber Wolf.  However, my question specifically stated that it had to be a new name assumed by a Legionnaire after joining the Legion.  Lone Wolf changed his sobriquet to Timber Wolf before he joined the Legion.  He began the tale "School for Super-Villains", from Adventure Comics # 372 (Sep., 1968), as Timber Wolf, but didn't become a Legionnaire until the last panel.

 

And then there was Mon-El, who generated a great deal of consideration as to whether he should be included.  Peter mentioned him in his answer, but figured he didn't count.  Fraser included Mon in his list, as did Luis, after he reconsidered his original answer to the question.

 

The notion that Mon-El should be included goes to a misconception that many hold about Mon's Legion membership.  In Adventure Comics # 300 (Sep., 1962), he was freed from the Phantom Zone, thanks to Saturn Girl's XY-4 serum, just long enough to defeat the Urthlo robot.  The misbelief is that, before being sent back into the Zone, the other super-teens made Mon an honorary Legionnaire.  But that's incorrect, as seen in panel 1 of the last page of the story, the Legionnaires voted him in as "our club's newest member."  Nothing about it being honorary, nor was anything said about it being honorary four issues later, when Mon-El appeared in "The Stolen Super-Powers", even though his status as a Legionnaire was mentioned several times.

 

In Adventure Comics # 305 (Feb., 1963), Mon-El applied for Legion membership in the guise of "Legionnaire Lemon"/"Marvel Lad" as a gag, while he waited to see if Brainiac 5's cure for his lead poisoning would last for twenty-four hours without ill effects.  Thus, he did not become a Legionnaire as Lemon/Marvel Lad and then change his name (back) to Mon-El.  He was already a Legionnaire as Mon-El.  There's no permanent name change as a Legionnaire there, so he doesn't count as one of the members in the correct answer.

 

And now we get to the part that I had to do some agonising over.  Both Peter and Randomnole included Lightning Lad in their answers, on the basis that he was called "Lightning Boy" in that first Legion tale from Adventure Comics # 247 (Apr., 1958), but with his next appearance, it was changed to "Lightning Lad".

 

I'd forgotten about that one.

 

My question was meant to address those Legionnaires who had, with deliberation, changed their names.  In other words, it was a conscious change within the context of the stories.  I didn't think to make that clear in the question because I just plain out forgot about "Lightning Boy".

 

In a post, Philip contrived a possible way that "Lightning Boy" could fit into what became the accepted canon of the Legion's beginnings, but I prefer to go with what Fraser posted immediately thereafter, that "Lightning Boy" was a growing-pains glitch.  In any event, even though it wasn't what I had intended in the asking, "Lightning Boy/Lightning Lad" did fit the wording of my question, so I had to rule Peter and Randomnole correct on that score.

 

 

7.  Thanks to the machinations of Dream Girl, Lightning Lass was expelled from the Legion for violating what provision of the Legion Constitution?

 

Everybody, but, everybody got this one right!  The only reason I asked it was because I wondered if anyone would fall into the "no duplication of powers" trap---but nobody did.  When Dream Girl's machinations had (apparently) left her without a super-power, Lightning Lass was expelled from the Legion under its constitution's requirement that no-one can be a Legionnaire without a genuine super-power.  Dream Girl stated that Lightning Lass' power "wasn't needed" because it was the same as her brother's.  The Legion, of course, had no prohibition against the duplication of super-powers in the Silver Age.

 

 

8.  Other than Luthor, what recurring 20th-century super-villain from Earth was mentioned by name in a Legion story appearing in Adventure Comics?

 

This was the third of my last-minute substitute questions and the worst of the lot---because I failed to perform the necessary due diligence.  Instead, I went with what occurred to me at the time I needed a question.  And what occurred to me was Doctor Light, who earned a mention in the first Adult Legion story, appearing in Adventure Comics # 354 (Mar., 1967), when Superman and Cosmic Man pulled the costume-switching trick that was used against the Master of Light in Justice League of America # 12 (Jun., 1962).  Philip recalled that, and so did Eric.

 

But Philip originally answered with the Joker and the Penguin, whom I had forgotten were named in Adventure Comics # 341 (Feb., 1966) when the Legionnaires fled to the Batcave to escape Computo the Conqueror.  They also fit the requirements of the question; therefore, Phillip was also correct with those answers, as were Randomnole, who also replied with the two Bat-villains, and Peter, who recalled the Joker getting a nod in a Legion tale.

 

There were a couple of other villain names submitted.  Fraser offered Bizarro.  If he's referring to the first Bizarro, the Bizarro-Superboy created by Professor Dalton in Superboy # 68 (Aug., 1958) and mentioned by Superboy in Adventure Comics # 329, that's an incorrect answer for two reasons.  First, he was not "recurring", as the question specified; the Bizarro-Superboy was destroyed at the end of the story.  Second, he was not a villain, simply a pathetic version of the Boy of Steel who wreaked havoc inadvertently.

 

A case could be made for the first Bizarro-Superman, created in Action Comics # 254 (Jul., 1959), being a super-villain, but that Bizarro was never mentioned in a Legion tale, so he doesn't fit the question, either.

 

Luis replied to this one with Mister Mxyzptlk.  Yes, he was mentioned, as Mask Man's ancestor, in Adventure Comics # 310 (Jul., 1963), and he even appeared, as a youngster, in Adventure Comics # 351 (Dec., 1966).  But the problem with ol' Mxy is that he's not from Earth, as the question required, but rather, from the fifth-dimensional land of Zrfff.

 

 

9.  According to the Legion Constitution, what is the maximum number of successive space missions a Legionnaire may undertake without a rest period?

 

I thought that this one would be a whole lot more obscure, but you guys rattled it off, one after the other.  At least, Fraser, Philip, Peter, Randomnole, Prince Hal, and Eric did.  "The Mutiny of the Legionnaires", from Adventure Comics # 318 (Mar., 1964), must be one of their favourite Legion stories because they all knew that, at the end of the tale, the Legion Constitution was amended to prohibit a Legionnaire from going on more than five consecutive space missions without a rest period.  That was after Sun Boy went space-crazy.

 

 

10.  We all know that Cosmic Boy was the Legion's first leader, right?  But where---comic and issue number---was that first definitively established?

 

As Philip Portelli and Richard Willis pointed out in their posts, Cosmic Boy sure seemed to be running things in Adventure Comics # 300-3.  But there was never any explicit statement, either in the dialogue or the captions, that he was the Legion's leader.  The formal position of leader wasn't addressed until Adventure Comics # 304 (Jan., 1963), when Saturn Girl was placed in the job.

Cosmic Boy's leadership status was left unacknowledged until a "Know Your Legionnaires" text piece on the boy from Braal ran in Adventure Comics # 352 (Jan., 1967).  The article not only provided the personal information on Cos, but it recounted, for the first time, the origin of the Legion, itself (along with the promise that the full story of the Legion's beginnings would be published in a future issue---eventually, Superboy [Giant Annual] # 147 [May-Jun., 1968]).

The last paragraph of the piece informs us that Cosmic Boy was, indeed, the first leader of the Legion.  Philip and Luis knew this.  Peter cited it, but thought there might be an earlier reference.  There wasn't; it took the series five years to tell us this.

 

 

 

And, now, the question that everybody missed, but just barely . . .

 

 

5.  Besides their super-son, which Legionnaires have Ma and Pa Kent knowingly met?

 

Besides Superboy, Jonathan and Martha Kent knowingly encountered seven Legionnaires.

 

The easy ones were Mon-El and Duo Damsel and Shadow Lass, whom the Kents met when the three Legionnaires, along with Superboy, fled to 20th-century Smallville with Mordru the Merciless hot on their tails, in Adventure Comics # 369-70 (Jun. and Jul.,1968).  I knew all of you would recall this Legion epic.

 

More difficult to name were Cosmic Boy and Saturn Girl and Lightning Lad because the Kents didn't meet the Legion's charter members until the last two panels of "Prisoner of the Super-Heroes", from Adventure Comics # 267 (Dec., 1959).  Philip, Luis, Randomnole, and Eric all included them in their responses to the question.

 

So, who was the elusive seventh Legionnaire?  Many of your answers indicated other Legion members who visited Superboy's time.  Star Boy and Colossal Boy were suggested, but neither of them bumped into the Kents during their respective visits to Smallville.  The same holds true for Brainiac 5, whom none of you mentioned, but appeared in the Superboy solo tale in Adventure Comics # 309 (Jun., 1963).

 

And when Supergirl time-traveled to stay with the Kents in Adventure Comics # 278 (Nov., 1960), she was not yet a Legionnaire, so she doesn't count, either.

 

As we moved into July, I began to think that nobody would come up with the last vital Legionnaire.  Then, this past Saturday, Luis named the right name:  Chameleon Boy---who met Ma and Pa Kent in "Clark Kent, He-Man", from Adventure Comics # 305 (Feb., 1963).

 

I was all set to crown Luis with laurels for being the only one to correctly answer question # 5---until I went back and checked his original reply.  Unfortunately, even with the addition of Chameleon Boy, his response to question # 5 would have received the Dreaded Buzzer of Shame.  You see, Luis had included Ultra "Lad" [Boy] among his list of those who had met the Kents.  And, as both Philip and Peter pointed out, during Ultra Boy's three visits to Superboy's time (Superboy # 98 and # 100, Adventure Comics # 301), he never even so much as nodded to either Ma or Pa Kent.

 

That means I had to rule his answer incorrect, as well.  Yes, it's a technicality, but a crucial one, like when you get buzzed as being wrong on Jeopardy! for replying to "She starred as Gidget and the Flying Nun." with "Who was Sally Fields?"

 

Nevertheless, Luis gets a huge "atta boy!" for coming up with the Legionnaire that everyone else missed.  For that matter, you can all pat yourselves on the back for one reason or another, either for answering so many questions correctly or for beating everyone else in getting a stumper right.

 

Of course, I've come to expect no less from you masters of Silver-Age trivia.

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On #8, yes, that's a fair call on Bizarro.

On #9, I don't know that it's a favorite, but it certainly is gripping. The whole idea of a good guy turning into a martinet (back before writers started normalizing that) and the Legion adrift in space had me hooked. Borrowing from classic lit plots (Mutiny on the Bounty, Moby Dick, etc.) really did create some enjoyable Legion stories.

A fun time as always, Commander.

What a good time! There are dents on my keyboard where I smacked myself in the forehead with it on the  obvious ones I missed. But a good time nonetheless.

I will likely blow these quizzes because I never remember the Bits o' Legion Business - when I read these originally, I barely paid attention to them (me being all of eight years old - "Where are the PICTURES???)" - and those lettercols aren't reprinted anywhere. So be it; they're legit sources.

I will, however, still hold out that Superboy/Superman is applicable for Kal-El having changed his name. You specified "Excluding the Adult Legion stories, name all of the Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones."

"Excluding the Adult Legion stories" - sure. Just to note a couple, there's "The World of Doomed Olsens" and "The Superman Super-Spectacular", among many others (such as the story with "Our American Heroes.") Superman appeared with the teen Legionnaires.

"Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones" That kinda defines Superboy to Superman. (TANGENT: I am minded of the story "When Superboy Became Sperman" by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito, where not only did the Teen of Steel's name changed - so did his physical appearance!*)

But Lightning Boy - dang! I have the shame.

I was rather expecting to see "What were Night Girl's powers?" I'll bet that could've sparked some discussion. Maybe next year.

Commander, I always enjoy your columns, and especially your quizzes, just no end; they are a highlight of my summer! Long may you wave!

I remain,

Sincerely,

Eric L. Sofer

The Silver Age Fogey

*Listen, I could've mentioned Kal-El becoming Sonn; I think a century is pretty permanent. But Sonn wasn't a Legionnaire.

Funny, I couldn't get enough of stuff like that, even as a kid.

You make a good case for Superman (I'll see what the Commander thinks) but Night Girl? Aren't her powers fairly clear-cut?

Eric L. Sofer said:

What a good time! There are dents on my keyboard where I smacked myself in the forehead with it on the  obvious ones I missed. But a good time nonetheless.

I will likely blow these quizzes because I never remember the Bits o' Legion Business - when I read these originally, I barely paid attention to them (me being all of eight years old - "Where are the PICTURES???)" - and those lettercols aren't reprinted anywhere. So be it; they're legit sources.

I will, however, still hold out that Superboy/Superman is applicable for Kal-El having changed his name. You specified "Excluding the Adult Legion stories, name all of the Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones."

"Excluding the Adult Legion stories" - sure. Just to note a couple, there's "The World of Doomed Olsens" and "The Superman Super-Spectacular", among many others (such as the story with "Our American Heroes.") Superman appeared with the teen Legionnaires.

"Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones" That kinda defines Superboy to Superman. (TANGENT: I am minded of the story "When Superboy Became Sperman" by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito, where not only did the Teen of Steel's name changed - so did his physical appearance!*)

But Lightning Boy - dang! I have the shame.

I was rather expecting to see "What were Night Girl's powers?" I'll bet that could've sparked some discussion. Maybe next year.

Commander, I always enjoy your columns, and especially your quizzes, just no end; they are a highlight of my summer! Long may you wave!

I remain,

Sincerely,

Eric L. Sofer

The Silver Age Fogey

*Listen, I could've mentioned Kal-El becoming Sonn; I think a century is pretty permanent. But Sonn wasn't a Legionnaire.

Commander, one question: was there any particular reason you cut off the Silver Age (for the purposes of finding answers) short of your usual point? I looked at the excluded issues (not closely, I admit) and didn't see what difference it would have made.

Thanks, Commander.  I may have missed many marks, but I sure had a good time searching for the answers, as well as reading the commentary and this very thread!

Fraser Sherman said:

Commander, one question: was there any particular reason you cut off the Silver Age (for the purposes of finding answers) short of your usual point? I looked at the excluded issues (not closely, I admit) and didn't see what difference it would have made.

I cut off the Legion quiz at Adventure Comics # 372 (Sep., 1968) because when artist Curt Swan departed, it no longer felt like the real Legion to me.  Even though I mark the end of the Silver Age as December, 1968, that whole year was transitional.  For example, the last "real" issue of Justice League of America, for me, was issue # 63 (Jun., 1968), the last issue written by Gardner Fox and drawn by Mike Sekowsky.  Similarly (and coïncidentally), the last "real" issue of Challengers of the Unknown was # 63 (Aug.-Sep., 1968), the last one drawn by Bob Brown.

But, by December, 1968, the Silver Age was over---everywhere.

I never read the "Clark Kent, He-Man!" story from Adventure Comics #305 as it was never reprinted. But there were so many of these "Legionnaire Appears at the End of the Story to Save the Day!" tales that they could fill their own collection!

Another grand quiz, Commander! 

Perhaps you could do an Avengers or Fantastic Four themed one next?

As to the matter of whether Superboy becoming Superman qualifies as a proper response to question # 6, I did consider that, but felt including it as an answer came too close to making it a trick question.  The changes of name in the cases of Element Lad and Light Lass and Duo Damsel were clearly driven by circumstances of the plots.  Superboy, on the other hand, simply had to grow up to become Superman.  Yes, I know there have been at least three tales intended to mark the moment when Clark started calling himself "--man", instead of "--boy".  But those were intended to be coming-of-age stories, not watershed moments, like losing one of your three bodies or having your powers altered were.

Of course, I had the same situation in the Adult Legion tales, with nearly all of the Legionnaires maturing into a name-change of "Man" or "Woman", and that's why I excluded them---because there were so many that it would've made the question essentially pointless and because those, too, were coming-of-age situations.

I overlooked the fact that Superman appeared in vastly more stories than just Adult Legion adventures.  (The fact that, at times, the teen-age Legion appeared with Superman is immaterial; it's the fact of the Man of Steel's existence---he's still a Legionnaire,even when he's fighting the Royal Flush Gang with the rest of the Justice League.)  I should have worded the question to also preclude Superboy-to-Superman, but I didn't.  So, if you want it to count, it's fine with me, Fogey.

I always look forward to posting my summer quizzes because I know that you'll chime in with answers and information and opinions, Eric.  You never cease to bring up something worth reflecting upon.  I hope you and yours have been well and prosperous during the past year, and for many more to come!

That makes perfect sense. Glad I didn't spend any more time scouring the rest of '68 for the clue I was convinced lay in those last issues.

My personal Silver Age for JLA runs through Gardner Fox's departure — I'm very fond of the Red Tornado two-parter and hated Denny O'Neil's run. But like you say, that's a personal call.

Out of curiosity, where would you cut off Silver Age for the Flash? I just finished the third Silver Age Omnibus with Andru/Esposito taking over on art and Frank Robbins becoming the writer for a while — was one of them or both of them your cutoff?

Commander Benson said:

Fraser Sherman said:

Commander, one question: was there any particular reason you cut off the Silver Age (for the purposes of finding answers) short of your usual point? I looked at the excluded issues (not closely, I admit) and didn't see what difference it would have made.

I cut off the Legion quiz at Adventure Comics # 372 (Sep., 1968) because when artist Curt Swan departed, it no longer felt like the real Legion to me.  Even though I mark the end of the Silver Age as December, 1968, that whole year was transitional.  For example, the last "real" issue of Justice League of America, for me, was issue # 63 (Jun., 1968), the last issue written by Gardner Fox and drawn by Mike Sekowsky.  Similarly (and coïncidentally), the last "real" issue of Challengers of the Unknown was # 63 (Aug.-Sep., 1968), the last one drawn by Bob Brown.

But, by December, 1968, the Silver Age was over---everywhere.

I found a slightly different answer to question number 2 (about who belonged to the Legion Espionage Squad). The Legion Outpost in Adventure 347 listed Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Saturn Girl; in Adventure 363's letter column, either Mort or Nelson or both told us that, in addition to leader Cham, the squad consisted of Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Duo Damsel. I guess DD got listed instead because she had an active undercover role in Adventure 360, while Saturn Girl was stuck on Takron-Galtos washboarding clothes.

Thanks for posting this quiz, Commander, this was lots of fun!

Misery in Spades said:

I found a slightly different answer to question number 2 (about who belonged to the Legion Espionage Squad). The Commander listed Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Saturn Girl; in Adventure 363's letter column, either Mort or Nelson or both told us that, in addition to leader Cham, the squad consisted of Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Duo Damsel.

And that counts!  Good head work, MiS.  I thought I'd remembered a list of permanent Espionage Squadders that included Duo Damsel, but I wasn't sure if that came from a fan site or an official source, such as you found.

I went back through everybody's answers to see if anyone answered question # 2 with the line-up from that lettercol reply in Adventure Comics # 363, and found that Fraser and Philip had supplied that exact line-up.  (They might have been subconsciously recalling that particular letter and response.)  So, they get credit for correct answers to question # 2, also.

I'm glad you enjoyed it, MiS.  I do one every summer---though I don't usually screw it up this much!

I might have remembered the letter unconsciously. I was definitely influenced by Luornu infiltrating the presidential palace in "The Legion Chain Gang." She seemed such a logical fit for the Espionage Squad I couldn't imagine she wasn't officially part of it (as opposed to Lightning Lad, who also contributed to the mission, but clearly didn't make sense as a regular member).

Fraser

Commander Benson said:

Misery in Spades said:

I found a slightly different answer to question number 2 (about who belonged to the Legion Espionage Squad). The Commander listed Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Saturn Girl; in Adventure 363's letter column, either Mort or Nelson or both told us that, in addition to leader Cham, the squad consisted of Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Phantom Girl, and Duo Damsel.

And that counts!  Good head work, MiS.  I thought I'd remembered a list of permanent Espionage Squadders that included Duo Damsel, but I wasn't sure if that came from a fan site or an official source, such as you found.

I went back through everybody's answers to see if anyone answered question # 2 with the line-up from that lettercol reply in Adventure Comics # 363, and found that Fraser and Philip had supplied that exact line-up.  (They might have been subconsciously recalling that particular letter and response.)  So, they get credit for correct answers to question # 2, also.

I'm glad you enjoyed it, MiS.  I do one every summer---though I don't usually screw it up this much!

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