Deck Log Entry # 227 The Silver-Age Challenge---the Legion of Super-Heroes Edition II . . . Answers!

I expected a Legion quiz to get a robust response, and you fellows didn't disappoint.  Lots of lively speculation on the possible right answers and, in at least two cases, answers other than the ones I intended, but had to rule them correct.  We'll get to those in due time.

 

As most of you know, I don't indulge in trick questions.  No "How many months have twenty-eight days?" stuff because the idea is to test your Silver-Age knowledge, not to outwit you with semantics.  That doesn't mean that you don't have to consider the wording.  I choose my words carefully, mostly to avoid confusion, but sometimes for other purposes.  I do set up certain questions expecting (or, perhaps, hoping) the players leap to a particular---and particularly wrong---response.

 

Most of you didn't fall for any of the snares I designed in this year's challenge, though there was some dissention over what the not-so-obvious correct responses were.  And there was one which stumped absolutely no-one.

 

On the other hand, one of the more straightforward questions, nobody got right.  (Although one of you came so very close, just one name too many.)  That hasn't happened since my Superman quiz back in 2014.  That's how sharp you guys are.

 

Perhaps the thing which makes the Legion of Super-Heroes so popular, both for the quizmaster and the quiz-takers, is that, even limited to the Silver Age, the series had a rich, expansive history.  Unlike other DC series of the time, the Legion experienced actual and constant development.  Legionnaires were added, expelled, killed, maimed, and transformed.  They were involved in romantic relationships.  They had parents and family.  Occasionally, a character from one of their backgrounds, decent or criminal, would pop up.

 

Not only did the series have depth, it had breadth.  Even taking Superboy/man out of consideration, there wasn't a title edited by Mort Weisinger that the Legion didn't touch.  In Superboy, Legionnaires made sporadic guest appearances, and when they didn't, there was always Lana Lang (Legion Reservist) and Pete Ross (honorary Legionnaire) to remind you of the Super-Hero Club.  Jimmy Olsen, also an honorary member, regularly appeared in his own title, plus Superman and Lois Lane and Action Comics, where full-fledged Legionnaire, Supergirl, occupied the back-up feature.  The Composite Superman received the powers of twenty Legionnaires from a set of their statuettes, enabling him to kick the asses of Superman and Batman in two memorable issues of World's Finest Comics.

 

That allowed for a treasure trove of Legion lore, eagerly soaked up by the fans and capitalised upon by writers of trivia quizzes.  Consider:  I've done two Silver-Age challenges on the Legion of Super-Heroes; yet, I've never done one on my favourite Silver-Age series, the Justice League of America.

 

O.K., enough blather.  It's time to reveal how you folks did.  I'll reserve the one that everybody missed until last just to keep the interest.

 

 

 

1.  Who was the first non-charter member of the Legion of Substitute Heroes?

 

This was one of my replacement questions and the one I liked because of its "Hey, I didn't know that!" factor.  Color Kid is set up as the obvious answer, but Fraser Sherman and Peter Wrexham weren't fooled.  They both knew that Dream Girl was the first non-charter member of the Substitute Heroes.

 

Philip Portelli went with Color Kid, but he allowed that there might be some blurring over the exact order of the next three Subs to join after the original five.  That might be why Luis Otavio de Moura Dantas went with Star Boy.  But the order of joining is evident, if one looks at panel two of the last page of "The Legionnaire Who Killed, from Adventure Comics # 342 (Mar., 1966).

 

There we see Dream Girl leading Star Boy to the Substitute Heroes' space cruiser, while stating, "I joined the Legion of Substitute Heroes . . . and I and they want you to join, too, Star Boy!"

 

So clearly, Dream Girl joined before Star Boy.  And how do we know that she also joined before Color Kid?  If you look at that same panel, which I've helpfully provided, you see the Substitute Heroes waiting by their ship---and there's just five of them.  The original five.  No Color Kid.

 

Color Kid was probably still drowning his sorrows in a Martian milk shake at the Interplanetary Soda Shoppe.

 

 

2.  Who is the leader of the Legion Espionage Squad and which Legionnaires are permanently assigned to the squad?

 

Everybody knew that Chameleon Boy was the leader of the Espionage Squad.  I made that part of the question only because I've actually seen statements on other sites that (incorrectly) insisted that Invisible Kid was the leader of the Squad.

 

But only one of you knew precisely which other Legionnaires were permanently assigned to the Espionage Squad---Invisible Kid, Shrinking Violet, Saturn Girl, and Phantom Girl.  That was Peter, who also provided the references:  Cham was established as the Squad's leader in a "Know Your Legionnaires" text piece in Adventure Comics # 329 (Feb., 1965); the answer to a letter published in the Legion Outpost in Adventure Comics # 347 (Aug., 1966) established which Legionnaires were permanently assigned to the Squad.

 

Incidentally, while some of you named other Legionnaires, Peter was the only one to include Saturn Girl on his list.

 

 

3.  On what 20th-century television programme did the Legion make a guest appearance?

 

I figured most of you would get this one right.  Fraser, Philip, Prince Hal, and my old pal, Eric Sofer, the Silver-Age Fogey, did.  It is, indeed, Our American Heroes.  In Action Comics # 309 (Feb., 1964), the Legion travelled back to the twentieth century on the evening when an episode of the show honoured Superman. The reason I felt it could be tricky was because I thought somebody might mistake the title of the story itself---"The Superman Super-Spectacular"---as the name of the television programme.

 

4.  On what world is Element Lad's super-power viewed as criminal and results in planetary banishment?

 

Fraser, Phil, Prince Hal, and Eric certainly know the corollary details about the Legion.  In "The Legion of Super-Villains", from Superman # 147 (Aug., 1961), Cosmic King revealed how he acquired his power of transmutation of elements.  Unfortunately, he was a native of Venus, a world that considers such a power as evil, and he was banished from it.  Even though it never came up in a Legion story, Element Lad possesses the same power and one would assume he would receive the same treatment from the Venusians.

 

6.  Excluding the Adult Legion stories, name all of the Legionnaires who, at some point after joining the Legion, permanently replaced their super-hero names with new ones.

 

This was one of the lesser questions that I had to substitute at the last minute.  It was awkward to write because I had to exclude all the boy-to-man and girl-to-woman name changes that arose in the Adult Legion tales.  And also I thought it was a bit too easy.  There was only one permanent name change that might be not easily remembered.  Yet, as it turned out, that wasn't the tough part for any of you.

 

Still, I should have written that question just a little better, as we will quickly see.

 

The ones who get credit for getting the question right are Peter and Randomnole, who correctly named Mystery Lad/Element Lad and Lightning Lass/Light Lass and Triplicate Girl/Duo Damsel.  Yes, I know they both added a fourth name; I'll be getting to that.

I purposefully added the word "permanently" to the question to avoid all those brief-lived names that Legionnaires took on, usually for one story.  That let out many of the ones that Eric named.

 

Philip, Luis, Prince Hal, and Eric included Lone Wolf/Timber Wolf.  However, my question specifically stated that it had to be a new name assumed by a Legionnaire after joining the Legion.  Lone Wolf changed his sobriquet to Timber Wolf before he joined the Legion.  He began the tale "School for Super-Villains", from Adventure Comics # 372 (Sep., 1968), as Timber Wolf, but didn't become a Legionnaire until the last panel.

 

And then there was Mon-El, who generated a great deal of consideration as to whether he should be included.  Peter mentioned him in his answer, but figured he didn't count.  Fraser included Mon in his list, as did Luis, after he reconsidered his original answer to the question.

 

The notion that Mon-El should be included goes to a misconception that many hold about Mon's Legion membership.  In Adventure Comics # 300 (Sep., 1962), he was freed from the Phantom Zone, thanks to Saturn Girl's XY-4 serum, just long enough to defeat the Urthlo robot.  The misbelief is that, before being sent back into the Zone, the other super-teens made Mon an honorary Legionnaire.  But that's incorrect, as seen in panel 1 of the last page of the story, the Legionnaires voted him in as "our club's newest member."  Nothing about it being honorary, nor was anything said about it being honorary four issues later, when Mon-El appeared in "The Stolen Super-Powers", even though his status as a Legionnaire was mentioned several times.

 

In Adventure Comics # 305 (Feb., 1963), Mon-El applied for Legion membership in the guise of "Legionnaire Lemon"/"Marvel Lad" as a gag, while he waited to see if Brainiac 5's cure for his lead poisoning would last for twenty-four hours without ill effects.  Thus, he did not become a Legionnaire as Lemon/Marvel Lad and then change his name (back) to Mon-El.  He was already a Legionnaire as Mon-El.  There's no permanent name change as a Legionnaire there, so he doesn't count as one of the members in the correct answer.

 

And now we get to the part that I had to do some agonising over.  Both Peter and Randomnole included Lightning Lad in their answers, on the basis that he was called "Lightning Boy" in that first Legion tale from Adventure Comics # 247 (Apr., 1958), but with his next appearance, it was changed to "Lightning Lad".

 

I'd forgotten about that one.

 

My question was meant to address those Legionnaires who had, with deliberation, changed their names.  In other words, it was a conscious change within the context of the stories.  I didn't think to make that clear in the question because I just plain out forgot about "Lightning Boy".

 

In a post, Philip contrived a possible way that "Lightning Boy" could fit into what became the accepted canon of the Legion's beginnings, but I prefer to go with what Fraser posted immediately thereafter, that "Lightning Boy" was a growing-pains glitch.  In any event, even though it wasn't what I had intended in the asking, "Lightning Boy/Lightning Lad" did fit the wording of my question, so I had to rule Peter and Randomnole correct on that score.

 

 

7.  Thanks to the machinations of Dream Girl, Lightning Lass was expelled from the Legion for violating what provision of the Legion Constitution?

 

Everybody, but, everybody got this one right!  The only reason I asked it was because I wondered if anyone would fall into the "no duplication of powers" trap---but nobody did.  When Dream Girl's machinations had (apparently) left her without a super-power, Lightning Lass was expelled from the Legion under its constitution's requirement that no-one can be a Legionnaire without a genuine super-power.  Dream Girl stated that Lightning Lass' power "wasn't needed" because it was the same as her brother's.  The Legion, of course, had no prohibition against the duplication of super-powers in the Silver Age.

 

 

8.  Other than Luthor, what recurring 20th-century super-villain from Earth was mentioned by name in a Legion story appearing in Adventure Comics?

 

This was the third of my last-minute substitute questions and the worst of the lot---because I failed to perform the necessary due diligence.  Instead, I went with what occurred to me at the time I needed a question.  And what occurred to me was Doctor Light, who earned a mention in the first Adult Legion story, appearing in Adventure Comics # 354 (Mar., 1967), when Superman and Cosmic Man pulled the costume-switching trick that was used against the Master of Light in Justice League of America # 12 (Jun., 1962).  Philip recalled that, and so did Eric.

 

But Philip originally answered with the Joker and the Penguin, whom I had forgotten were named in Adventure Comics # 341 (Feb., 1966) when the Legionnaires fled to the Batcave to escape Computo the Conqueror.  They also fit the requirements of the question; therefore, Phillip was also correct with those answers, as were Randomnole, who also replied with the two Bat-villains, and Peter, who recalled the Joker getting a nod in a Legion tale.

 

There were a couple of other villain names submitted.  Fraser offered Bizarro.  If he's referring to the first Bizarro, the Bizarro-Superboy created by Professor Dalton in Superboy # 68 (Aug., 1958) and mentioned by Superboy in Adventure Comics # 329, that's an incorrect answer for two reasons.  First, he was not "recurring", as the question specified; the Bizarro-Superboy was destroyed at the end of the story.  Second, he was not a villain, simply a pathetic version of the Boy of Steel who wreaked havoc inadvertently.

 

A case could be made for the first Bizarro-Superman, created in Action Comics # 254 (Jul., 1959), being a super-villain, but that Bizarro was never mentioned in a Legion tale, so he doesn't fit the question, either.

 

Luis replied to this one with Mister Mxyzptlk.  Yes, he was mentioned, as Mask Man's ancestor, in Adventure Comics # 310 (Jul., 1963), and he even appeared, as a youngster, in Adventure Comics # 351 (Dec., 1966).  But the problem with ol' Mxy is that he's not from Earth, as the question required, but rather, from the fifth-dimensional land of Zrfff.

 

 

9.  According to the Legion Constitution, what is the maximum number of successive space missions a Legionnaire may undertake without a rest period?

 

I thought that this one would be a whole lot more obscure, but you guys rattled it off, one after the other.  At least, Fraser, Philip, Peter, Randomnole, Prince Hal, and Eric did.  "The Mutiny of the Legionnaires", from Adventure Comics # 318 (Mar., 1964), must be one of their favourite Legion stories because they all knew that, at the end of the tale, the Legion Constitution was amended to prohibit a Legionnaire from going on more than five consecutive space missions without a rest period.  That was after Sun Boy went space-crazy.

 

 

10.  We all know that Cosmic Boy was the Legion's first leader, right?  But where---comic and issue number---was that first definitively established?

 

As Philip Portelli and Richard Willis pointed out in their posts, Cosmic Boy sure seemed to be running things in Adventure Comics # 300-3.  But there was never any explicit statement, either in the dialogue or the captions, that he was the Legion's leader.  The formal position of leader wasn't addressed until Adventure Comics # 304 (Jan., 1963), when Saturn Girl was placed in the job.

Cosmic Boy's leadership status was left unacknowledged until a "Know Your Legionnaires" text piece on the boy from Braal ran in Adventure Comics # 352 (Jan., 1967).  The article not only provided the personal information on Cos, but it recounted, for the first time, the origin of the Legion, itself (along with the promise that the full story of the Legion's beginnings would be published in a future issue---eventually, Superboy [Giant Annual] # 147 [May-Jun., 1968]).

The last paragraph of the piece informs us that Cosmic Boy was, indeed, the first leader of the Legion.  Philip and Luis knew this.  Peter cited it, but thought there might be an earlier reference.  There wasn't; it took the series five years to tell us this.

 

 

 

And, now, the question that everybody missed, but just barely . . .

 

 

5.  Besides their super-son, which Legionnaires have Ma and Pa Kent knowingly met?

 

Besides Superboy, Jonathan and Martha Kent knowingly encountered seven Legionnaires.

 

The easy ones were Mon-El and Duo Damsel and Shadow Lass, whom the Kents met when the three Legionnaires, along with Superboy, fled to 20th-century Smallville with Mordru the Merciless hot on their tails, in Adventure Comics # 369-70 (Jun. and Jul.,1968).  I knew all of you would recall this Legion epic.

 

More difficult to name were Cosmic Boy and Saturn Girl and Lightning Lad because the Kents didn't meet the Legion's charter members until the last two panels of "Prisoner of the Super-Heroes", from Adventure Comics # 267 (Dec., 1959).  Philip, Luis, Randomnole, and Eric all included them in their responses to the question.

 

So, who was the elusive seventh Legionnaire?  Many of your answers indicated other Legion members who visited Superboy's time.  Star Boy and Colossal Boy were suggested, but neither of them bumped into the Kents during their respective visits to Smallville.  The same holds true for Brainiac 5, whom none of you mentioned, but appeared in the Superboy solo tale in Adventure Comics # 309 (Jun., 1963).

 

And when Supergirl time-traveled to stay with the Kents in Adventure Comics # 278 (Nov., 1960), she was not yet a Legionnaire, so she doesn't count, either.

 

As we moved into July, I began to think that nobody would come up with the last vital Legionnaire.  Then, this past Saturday, Luis named the right name:  Chameleon Boy---who met Ma and Pa Kent in "Clark Kent, He-Man", from Adventure Comics # 305 (Feb., 1963).

 

I was all set to crown Luis with laurels for being the only one to correctly answer question # 5---until I went back and checked his original reply.  Unfortunately, even with the addition of Chameleon Boy, his response to question # 5 would have received the Dreaded Buzzer of Shame.  You see, Luis had included Ultra "Lad" [Boy] among his list of those who had met the Kents.  And, as both Philip and Peter pointed out, during Ultra Boy's three visits to Superboy's time (Superboy # 98 and # 100, Adventure Comics # 301), he never even so much as nodded to either Ma or Pa Kent.

 

That means I had to rule his answer incorrect, as well.  Yes, it's a technicality, but a crucial one, like when you get buzzed as being wrong on Jeopardy! for replying to "She starred as Gidget and the Flying Nun." with "Who was Sally Fields?"

 

Nevertheless, Luis gets a huge "atta boy!" for coming up with the Legionnaire that everyone else missed.  For that matter, you can all pat yourselves on the back for one reason or another, either for answering so many questions correctly or for beating everyone else in getting a stumper right.

 

Of course, I've come to expect no less from you masters of Silver-Age trivia.

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Regarding Night Girl - as I recall from her origin, her father gave her a potion that granted her super strength (which turned out to only work in darkness.) That was it. But in other appearances, she appeared to become a pseudo-Kryptonian; flight, invulnerability. x-ray vision, sight in complete darkness,. etc.

I don't care, but it might have been interesting to have a type of counterpart to Ultra Boy in the Subs. And I wanted to know if I missed anything in Admiral Benson's time span.

Speaking of... Admiral, it's your column and your quiz, and your time frame. But I would like to submit for consideration - even if it's only for the Legion - that you might consider the end of that era to be Adventure Comics #379, the end of the Legion's tenure in Adventure. I know that there were other Legion appearances after that, and they soon jumped over to Action Comics. But it seems a clean break - not that Curt Swan's departure isn't - and provides a tiny bit more leeway. Mostly though, it's simple to know when Supergirl took over Adventure; knowing which issue was Mr. Swan's last is a little tougher.

It's hardly a bone of contention; just a suggestion. And thanks again for the GREAT quiz!

I remain,

Sincerely,

Eric L. Sofer

The Silver Age Fogey

Eric L. Sofer said:

And I wanted to know if I missed anything in Admiral Benson's time span.

That's a heck of a promotion! 

As everyone else has said, thank you very much for the quiz, Commander.  The Legion, particularly the Silver-Age version, has always been a favourite of mine, so it was an enormous pleasure to have the excuse to dig out my old copies of Adventure and look for answers.  It was quite a surprise to find out how much I remembered, though it did need research to confirm many of the answers, and find information that I didn't remember in detail.

"clearly, Dream Girl joined before Star Boy.  And how do we know that she also joined before Color Kid?  If you look at that same panel, which I've helpfully provided, you see the Substitute Heroes waiting by their ship---and there's just five of them.  The original five.  No Color Kid."

Looking at that panel, you could argue that it's possible that Color Kid is standing to the right of Stone Boy, hidden by the door of the Subs' flyer.  But I don't think it's at all likely!  That issue shows him being rejected for membership of the Legion, and advised to try the Subs, but there's no mention of him actually having done so until Adventure #351.

"Peter was the only one to include Saturn Girl on his list [of Espionage Squad members]."

This was one of the questions I had to research.  Until I found the reference I had no idea that Saturn Girl was a member.  Telepathy is certainly a very useful power for a spy, but I'm not aware of any stories in which she was actually shown working with the Squad.

I had wondered why Fraser and Philip included Duo Damsel in the lineup instead of Imra.  Adventure #360 showed most of the free members of the Legion working under Chameleon Boy's orders as leader of the Squad, not just DD.  So congratulations to Misery In Spades for finding a reference for that alternative list of members!

"Fraser, Phil, Prince Hal, and Eric certainly know the corollary details about the Legion.  Even though it never came up in a Legion story, Element Lad possesses the same power [as Cosmic King] and one would assume he would receive the same treatment [i.e. banishment] from the Venusians."

Ahem.  I think you mean "Fraser, Phil, Peter, Prince Hal, and Eric..."!

"Philip originally answered with the Joker and the Penguin, whom I had forgotten were named in Adventure Comics # 341. They also fit the requirements of the question; therefore, Phillip was also correct with those answers, as were Randomnole, who also replied with the two Bat-villains, and Peter, who recalled the Joker getting a nod in a Legion tale."

After complaining that you didn't give me credit for the transmutation question, I should acknowledge that you were generous to give me credit for this one.  As I said, I had a vague feeling that the Joker got a mention, but I had no idea where, and failed to find the relevant issue.  Which is particularly galling, as I started buying Adventure regularly with the two-part story in #340 and #341.

And, once again, thanks for the quiz.  I had a great time with it!

How did I miss that about Night Girl?

Eric L. Sofer said:

Regarding Night Girl - as I recall from her origin, her father gave her a potion that granted her super strength (which turned out to only work in darkness.) That was it. But in other appearances, she appeared to become a pseudo-Kryptonian; flight, invulnerability. x-ray vision, sight in complete darkness,. etc.

I don't care, but it might have been interesting to have a type of counterpart to Ultra Boy in the Subs. And I wanted to know if I missed anything in Admiral Benson's time span.

Speaking of... Admiral, it's your column and your quiz, and your time frame. But I would like to submit for consideration - even if it's only for the Legion - that you might consider the end of that era to be Adventure Comics #379, the end of the Legion's tenure in Adventure. I know that there were other Legion appearances after that, and they soon jumped over to Action Comics. But it seems a clean break - not that Curt Swan's departure isn't - and provides a tiny bit more leeway. Mostly though, it's simple to know when Supergirl took over Adventure; knowing which issue was Mr. Swan's last is a little tougher.

It's hardly a bone of contention; just a suggestion. And thanks again for the GREAT quiz!

I remain,

Sincerely,

Eric L. Sofer

The Silver Age Fogey

Eric L. Sofer said:

Regarding Night Girl - as I recall from her origin, her father gave her a potion that granted her super strength (which turned out to only work in darkness.) That was it. But in other appearances, she appeared to become a pseudo-Kryptonian; flight, invulnerability. x-ray vision, sight in complete darkness,. etc.

Even as a kid, I wondered why just about every superhuman from every planet in the Weisinger books, except for the LOSH, had the same set of Kryptonian powers. Did they think kids couldn't accept superpowers unless they were the usual set?

Thanks, guys, all of you, for the gracious comments about my quizzes.  They didn't start as an annual event, but just something to throw in once in a while, when I was dry for an article idea.  Then, they became so popular and looked-forward-to that I felt I had to do one every summer.  Fortunately, so far, I haven't run out of questions.

That's the thing:  the questions.  It's tough, and increasingly tougher, to find questions that aren't easily vanquished by a quick Google search and, yet, are still interesting when the answer is revealed.  Philip suggested a quiz on the Avengers or the Fantastic Four.  Believe me, I've considered both groups, but I haven't been able to collect enough questions that meet the two criteria I mentioned above.

Once I do put enough posers together, then the article essentially writes itself, but getting to that point takes months of scribbling down questions as they occur to me, then testing them with a search engine, to make sure they aren't easily solved.  I don't mean to make that sound laborious; it's not.  In fact, it's kind of fun.  But it's not as quickly done as, say, knocking out ten thousand words on Space Cabby.

To answer your question, Mr. Sherman, about my Silver-Age cut-off point for the Flash.  It's tempting to go with The Flash  # 174 (Nov., 1967). which was the last Silver-Age issue drawn by Carmine Infantino.  There was a definite shift in tone after he left, especially given that Andru and Esposito were not artists who conveyed motion or speed well.  But enough of the old Silver Age feeling clung to the next few issues.  The Flash # 175 (Dec., 1967) included one of the last appearances of the Silver-Age Justice League, as I defined it, and it was written by E. Nelson Bridwell, who had his DC lore down pat.  (I suspect that this tale was originally slated for Superman, but some sort of scheduling conflict put it down as a Flash entry.)  Issue # 176 ( Feb., 1968) carried two tales written by John Broome and # 177 (Mar., 1968) was written by Gardner Fox.

That's where I demark the end of the Silver-Age Flash.  That was Fox's last script for The Flash.  The series' other long-time writer, John Broome, would have a few more stories published in the title, but they were interspersed among the more frequent efforts of Young Turk writers, like Cary Bates and Mike Friedrich.  So the Silver-Age magic was definitely gone after The Flash # 177.

Again, gang, I appreciate the kind words about my quizzes.  Thanks!

Thank you. That fits with my personal feelings about the late 1960s Flash. As much as I like Frank Robbins' Batman work, he could not get the hang of Flash at all.

Commander Benson said:

Thanks, guys, all of you, for the gracious comments about my quizzes.  They didn't start as an annual event, but just something to throw in once in a while, when I was dry for an article idea.  Then, they became so popular and looked-forward-to that I felt I had to do one every summer.  Fortunately, so far, I haven't run out of questions.

That's the thing:  the questions.  It's tough, and increasingly tougher, to find questions that aren't easily vanquished by a quick Google search and, yet, are still interesting when the answer is revealed.  Philip suggested a quiz on the Avengers or the Fantastic Four.  Believe me, I've considered both groups, but I haven't been able to collect enough questions that meet the two criteria I mentioned above.

Once I do put enough posers together, then the article essentially writes itself, but getting to that point takes months of scribbling down questions as they occur to me, then testing them with a search engine, to make sure they aren't easily solved.  I don't mean to make that sound laborious; it's not.  In fact, it's kind of fun.  But it's not as quickly done as, say, knocking out ten thousand words on Space Cabby.

To answer your question, Mr. Sherman, about my Silver-Age cut-off point for the Flash.  It's tempting to go with The Flash  # 174 (Nov., 1967). which was the last Silver-Age issue drawn by Carmine Infantino.  There was a definite shift in tone after he left, especially given that Andru and Esposito were not artists who conveyed motion or speed well.  But enough of the old Silver Age feeling clung to the next few issues.  The Flash # 175 (Dec., 1967) included one of the last appearances of the Silver-Age Justice League, as I defined it, and it was written by E. Nelson Bridwell, who had his DC lore down pat.  (I suspect that this tale was originally slated for Superman, but some sort of scheduling conflict put it down as a Flash entry.)  Issue # 176 ( Feb., 1968) carried two tales written by John Broome and # 177 (Mar., 1968) was written by Gardner Fox.

That's where I demark the end of the Silver-Age Flash.  That was Fox's last script for The Flash.  The series' other long-time writer, John Broome, would have a few more stories published in the title, but they were interspersed among the more frequent efforts of Young Turk writers, like Cary Bates and Mike Friedrich.  So the Silver-Age magic was definitely gone after The Flash # 177.

Again, gang, I appreciate the kind words about my quizzes.  Thanks!

One of the unique pleasures of reading a Silver Age comic is reading the letter column or other text pages.  It's a shame that the Archive Editions don't reprint them along with the stories, especially since the Commander goes hunting there for his quiz material!

As Philip Portelli commented on the picture he posted, isn't it absurd that Lightning Lad was depicted in his superhero costume when he gained his powers from the lightning beasts?  Did the editor fall asleep on that one?

In a picture in Dave Palmer's post, during Jimmy Olsen's initiation as an honorary member, Chameleon Boy says, "You've helped us so much in the past..."  I know it was just a throwaway line, but did Jimmy really help the Legion multiple times?

Finally, in Adventure 318 "The Mutiny of the Legionnaires", I always found it unique that it was not a hoax or a deception, and Sun Boy was not an impostor or under mind control.  He really was mentally ill and needed help.  That seems pretty unusual for the times.

I found a site that includes many of the Adventure Comics letter columns--it's called Days of Adventure, run by a guy named Booksteve, who reproduced the covers of apparently the entire run of A.C. and included some notes about each issue; its address is: adventurecomicsblog.blogspot.com.

Randomnole said:

One of the unique pleasures of reading a Silver Age comic is reading the letter column or other text pages.  It's a shame that the Archive Editions don't reprint them along with the stories, especially since the Commander goes hunting there for his quiz material!

As Philip Portelli commented on the picture he posted, isn't it absurd that Lightning Lad was depicted in his superhero costume when he gained his powers from the lightning beasts?  Did the editor fall asleep on that one?

In a picture in Dave Palmer's post, during Jimmy Olsen's initiation as an honorary member, Chameleon Boy says, "You've helped us so much in the past..."  I know it was just a throwaway line, but did Jimmy really help the Legion multiple times?

Finally, in Adventure 318 "The Mutiny of the Legionnaires", I always found it unique that it was not a hoax or a deception, and Sun Boy was not an impostor or under mind control.  He really was mentally ill and needed help.  That seems pretty unusual for the times.

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