1)Interesting Parallel #1: The old series ended on a London council estate, and the new series began on one.

 

2)Interesting Parallel #2: The old series began with the Doctor taking people away from home who didn't want to leave home and who went home at their first opportunity, and it ended with him bringing someone home who didn't want to go home and who left with him again at their first opportunity.

 

3)Interesting Parallel #3: Paterson's argument that the kids must learn to fight or die is not entirely dissimilar to Ian's argument in the first Dalek story that the Thals must learn to fight or die.

 

4)You can hear Cartmel cringe when he discusses those lame cat puppets.

 

5)Paterson is played by Julian Holloway, son of Stanley Hollaway, a favorite of the Old Man's, particularly for the songs Sweeney Todd the Barber (How disappointed I was that the Sweeney Tood musical didn't include this song!) and With 'Er 'Ead Tucked Underneath 'Er Arm . Nothing to do with Doctor Who, I suppose, but fun songs, nonetheless.

 

6)"One finger can be a deadly weapon." Depends on what button you press.

 

7)Apparently, the two guys working the grocery store were a comedy team that was popular at the time - stunt casting that wouldn't mean much to us igmorant Yanks, I guess.

 

8)"People don't just vanish." "You did."

 

9)Karra is played by Lisa Bowerman, who would go on to voice Bernice Summerfield in several audio stories.

 

10)Not wild about the Master's outfit in this. Bow ties were not cool for him. He's kind of come down in the world in this one, basicially just taking over a gym class. "Next, the Pilates people will be mine!"

 

11)"Do you know any nice people? You know, ordinary people, not power-crazed nutters trying to take over the galaxy?"

 

12)The Cheetah People aren;t amazing, but they'r esurprisingly non-lame for 80's Doctor Who.

 

13)What's with the running in slow-motion business? It's like a shampoo commercial.

 

14)"If we fight like animals, we die like animals!"

 

15)I know she doesn't quite look like her enough, but in my own personal continuity that woman at the end who comes out and moans at the Doctor about people not taking proper care of their pets is a young Jackie Tyler.

 

16)"There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, and the sea's asleep, and the rivers dream. People made of smoke, and cities made of song. Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there’s injustice, somewhere else the tea's getting cold. Come on, Ace — we’ve got work to do!"

 

17)Cliffhangers:

  • Part One: It's the Master! Try to look surprised.
  • Part Two: Ace got the Yellow Eye!
  • Part Three: The Doctor and Ace leave Perivale...

 

Overall:

A so-so story, not the one I would have chosen for the series to go out on. I remember at the time being horrified at the thought that this was really the end of Doctor Who - little did I know that there was alot more to come.

 

Well, that's me caught up on the DVDs that I currently own. "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy" comes out Tuesday,  "Planet of Giants" next month and "Ambassadors of Death" in October.  No idea when "Terror of the Zygons" is coming out, or when the new show starts up again.

 

[Part of list of Doctor Who episodes here.]

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"Nothing to do with Doctor Who, I suppose"

Don't be silly.  Stanley Holloway played Eliza Doolittle's FATHER in MY FAIR LADY.  (Think "Leela".)

From a couple weeks ago, at the blog...

Philip Sandifer:
"Again, the televised order is better than people give it credit for. Not only does it make the most sense for Ace to finally be ready to return to Perivale once she's sorted out her past, this story builds gorgeously from the Freudian undercurrents of Fenric."

Yes, YES, YES!!!!!

She also looks and acts more "grown up" here. And for much of the story, more relaxed than we've ever seen her.


"puts him in a position where defeating him would be disastrous"

As with Ace-- IF she gives in to her usual anger, it will destroy her. What a tough challenge for her to be facing! She has to (as Biroc once said) "do nothing" if she wants to get out of this intact. It's really heart-wrenching. Is it any wonder I actually fell in love with her watching this one?


Tommy:
"It's like the story just ends abruptly right when it was getting really interesting."

And that goes for the series in general. Every time I watch this, I love it... and every time it ends, I think, "This was NO DAMN TIME to cancel the show!!!"

I guess it's no mystery the novels were a success. At this point, fans really, really desperately wanted and needed more!

In a better world, McCoy would have kept going until Eccleston came along.



Henry R. Kujawa said:

"Nothing to do with Doctor Who, I suppose"

Don't be silly.  Stanley Holloway played Eliza Doolittle's FATHER in MY FAIR LADY.  (Think "Leela".)

 

 

Never seen that. Must put that on the list.



Henry R. Kujawa said:

In a better world, McCoy would have kept going until Eccleston came along.

 

 

It's possible McCoy might have wanted to do something else before then. ;)

 

As I recall from what I've heard, McCoy would've liked to have done one more year, before passing it along to someone else.. I seem to remember a few years ago Doctor Who Magazine did an article speculating how the show might have developed had it not been cancelled. They had Ace leaving halfway through the next series, to be replaced by an "aristocratic cat burglar" (Shades of Lady Christina de Souza from "Planet of the Dead") and someone called Richard Griffiths becoming the Eighth Doctor - I haven't seen him in much, but I gather he was once considered as a potential Fifth Doctor and was a potential candidate for the Eighth as well, so who knows. So, if we posit McCoy going through '90, and Griffiths going through '95, we could bring in McGann (I still wish he could of gotten more of a run on TV) up through the turn of the century, we'd still have a gap to fill until the Eccleston Doctor came along.  I'm afraid I'm going to be a cliche and suggest Rowan Atkinson for that spot - assuming he'd do it - based on his performance in "The Curse of Fatal Death".  It may well be that there are better candidates, I'm not knowledgeable enough to say who, however.

 

 

There's no way to know. I recently read that after his 1st year (when he was cast at a VERY late date, and with vitrually no preparation time on anyone's part), McCoy said he'd probably leave after his 2nd year!  But then his 2nd year turned out so much better than his 1st, he decided to sign on for 2 more. So the fact that his contract was only to the end of his 4th year didn't mean he would have left then. I look at it this way. If someone's REALLY enjoying themselves on a show, they may decide to stay later. And at only 14 episodes a year, it's not like it would have been preventing him from doing OTHER THINGS during his "off" time.

Look at it another way. Roger Moore signed for 3 "007" films. After that, each films was negotiated separately. He wound up doing 4 MORE. (Although his 5th film turned out to be my favorite, these days I actually WISH he had left after his 4th. They were considering Timothy Dalton for FOR YOUR EYES ONLY... which would only have made a terrific film EVEN BETTER.  And I really doubt the 2 that followed it would have gotten as stupid as they did in spots if Dalton had been in them.)

The Baron:

"Never seen that. Must put that on the list."

Most musicals, I love the story and hate the music. Or vice-versa. This is one of the few where I love both. I only have one major problem with it... and it's Audrey Hepburn. It's not that she's bad... it's just that I really wish it had been Julie Andrews, who was so successful in the role on Broadway.

But then, it could have been worse!  The movie studio wanted to cast Cary Grant as Henry Higgins, and James Cagney as Eliza's father.  Cary Grant got very annoyed at this, and told the studio they absolutely HAD to cast Rex Harrison & Stanley Holloway, who had both in the Broadway version, or he'd never do another film for them again! (As it happens, he retired shortly after, so he never did another film for them anyway...) So we actually owe it to Cary Grant the film is as good as it was. But they passed on Andrews, insisting it had to be someone more "known"... who they then had to DUB all the singing parts for.

I've seen Andrews perform 2 of the songs from the pay on an old TV show, and she was sooooooooooo good in that, so much better than what was in the film. It makes me wonder if there was ever a videotaped record of the entire stage play. There really should have been, so later audiences would be able to see what they didn't if they never saw the play live in person.  (A few years back, I got the original Broadway cast album.  WOW.)

...This may seem like humongous thread-jacking , Henry , but I WILL bring this back around to the Doctor...........I am now listening on YouTube to the movie soundtrack's version of MFL's " On The Street Where You Live " . I am listening to the movie soundtrack , despite my general preference for , in musicals of that era , the Broadway version when there are both Broadway and movie versions , as the audio version excerpted of the MFL soundtrack includes the verse to the son...My parents had the B'Way cast LP of MFL too...I think it was the best-selling LP of all time up until that time and a few years after , I believe until the Vaughn Meader-featuring THE FIRST FAMILY LP , actually !...But , oddly enough , if you got a CD it's possible , even in a sealed freshly-packaged Sony CD , that you may have got another recording of MFL , the London cast from a couple years later , in which Harrison , Andrews , and Holloway all repeated their roles , and which had an essentially identical cover design , but a different backing color to it...And which I recall seeing , in a Borders' CD department before thay went out of business , hah hah !!!...But anyway...I once actually saw a sealed MFL cast CD whose packaging indicated it was the Broadway...but in fact contained the London .

  The London one was in mono , the Broadway was recorded just before stereo was generally introduced , at least for upscale LP projects .

  I read Andrews' memoirs a bit back , she herself in the book recalled doing the London version and , in her words , said that she thought her (and the others' , I guess) singing was much improved in it and said something like " Now , the Londo version is generally substituted for the B'Way " , or similar...I rather disagree with the idea that the Broadway should be kept in obscurity  , but anyway .

  The issue of MARVEL PREMIERE(??) that published UK Marvel Who strips for the first time in the USA had a cutesy cover showing Tom Baker saying " By George...I'VE GOT IT !!!!! " or similar .

Henry R. Kujawa said:

The Baron:

"Never seen that. Must put that on the list."

Most musicals, I love the story and hate the music. Or vice-versa. This is one of the few where I love both. I only have one major problem with it... and it's Audrey Hepburn. It's not that she's bad... it's just that I really wish it had been Julie Andrews, who was so successful in the role on Broadway.

But then, it could have been worse!  The movie studio wanted to cast Cary Grant as Henry Higgins, and James Cagney as Eliza's father.  Cary Grant got very annoyed at this, and told the studio they absolutely HAD to cast Rex Harrison & Stanley Holloway, who had both in the Broadway version, or he'd never do another film for them again! (As it happens, he retired shortly after, so he never did another film for them anyway...) So we actually owe it to Cary Grant the film is as good as it was. But they passed on Andrews, insisting it had to be someone more "known"... who they then had to DUB all the singing parts for.

I've seen Andrews perform 2 of the songs from the pay on an old TV show, and she was sooooooooooo good in that, so much better than what was in the film. It makes me wonder if there was ever a videotaped record of the entire stage play. There really should have been, so later audiences would be able to see what they didn't if they never saw the play live in person.  (A few years back, I got the original Broadway cast album.  WOW.)

ing goes , Henry , I recently re-saw FUNNY FACE , in which she does sing for herself...I am told she - in a " in the room " sense , sings in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S , which I have never seen  , but I have read Capote's long short story .

I saw both of those some years back when I still had cable (and TCM).  BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S-- this may sound like blaphemy-- I found too depressing to stand. Maybe I got into it too much or something, but that film left me feeling horrible when it was over.  FUNNY FACE, much more enjoyable.  I'd have to look up her films, I'm sure I've seen a few more.

I have both the stage play & movie soundtracks for ROCKY HORROR, and the funny thing was, the stage album had better sound (plus an extra song with Meat Loaf not in the movie).

Reportedly, Walt Disney went backstage to visit Julie Andrews one night when she was doing MY FAIR LADY (or, was it CAMELOT?).  She was waiting back to hear if they were going to have her in the movie version of MY FAIR LADY or not.  he told her, if they want you, by all means, do it, but if they don't, I have something else that might be perfect for you.  So that year, MY FAIR LADY won the Oscars for best actor (Rex Harrison) and best supporting actor (Stanley Holloway) while MARY POPPINS won for best actress (Julie Andrews).  You wanna bet the MFL movie people were kicking themselves for that?  (And they didn't want the 2 people who did win for their film!)  I kinda suspect Disney might have waited for Julie if she had gotten MFL.  She could have been in both...

MARY POPPINS was the only film my parents ever took me to see in theatres-- 3 TIMES!!!  As much as I like Julie Andrews, it's kinda disgraceful that there's still so many of her films I've never seen.  (But then, the same goes for Hitchcock...)

SURVIVAL remains one of my favorite Sylvester stories (along with REMEMBRANCE, GREATEST SHOW, HAPPINESS and BATTLEFIELD-- and both PARADISE & DELTA have been growing on me more and more over the years.

...I made a boo-boo/spoonerism/reversal in what I wrote above , Henry , I meant to and should have said that the original , mega-selling , Broadway cast LP of MFL was recorded in mono , and then that the couplish-years-later London cast LP was recorded in stereo !

Henry R. Kujawa said:

I saw both of those some years back when I still had cable (and TCM).  BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S-- this may sound like blaphemy-- I found too depressing to stand. Maybe I got into it too much or something, but that film left me feeling horrible when it was over.  FUNNY FACE, much more enjoyable.  I'd have to look up her films, I'm sure I've seen a few more.

I have both the stage play & movie soundtracks for ROCKY HORROR, and the funny thing was, the stage album had better sound (plus an extra song with Meat Loaf not in the movie).

Reportedly, Walt Disney went backstage to visit Julie Andrews one night when she was doing MY FAIR LADY (or, was it CAMELOT?).  She was waiting back to hear if they were going to have her in the movie version of MY FAIR LADY or not.  he told her, if they want you, by all means, do it, but if they don't, I have something else that might be perfect for you.  So that year, MY FAIR LADY won the Oscars for best actor (Rex Harrison) and best supporting actor (Stanley Holloway) while MARY POPPINS won for best actress (Julie Andrews).  You wanna bet the MFL movie people were kicking themselves for that?  (And they didn't want the 2 people who did win for their film!)  I kinda suspect Disney might have waited for Julie if she had gotten MFL.  She could have been in both...

MARY POPPINS was the only film my parents ever took me to see in theatres-- 3 TIMES!!!  As much as I like Julie Andrews, it's kinda disgraceful that there's still so many of her films I've never seen.  (But then, the same goes for Hitchcock...)

Had to look it up... I have the Broadway Cast recording (1956) on CD.

Actually, I just re-read your post, and now I'm not absolutely sure what I've got. But the package SAID it was the 1956 Broadway cast album, so...

Sometimes, mono can sound much better than stereo. It all depends on how it's done.

What I've found annoying in some cases is when a hit single is in mono, yet on later reissues, someone insists on putting out a INFERIOR stereo mix, which just does not sound right. ("Pleasant Valley Sunday" and "Speedy Gonzalez" are 2 examples that come to mind.) When I buy a "hits" album, I want the HIT versions!!!

Funny but true:  my best friend years back told me MY FAIR LADY was his favorite musical. He's also a huge fan of the Jeremy Brett SHERLOCK HOLMES. Yet, I had to point out to him that Jeremy Brett played Freddy in MY FAIR LADY! He never noticed.

There is, of course, if you look REAL close, a reference to MFL in "GHOST LIGHT".

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