A number of us were mulling this question over, and trying to define just what is a cross-over, as opposed to a "guest-star" or a "cameo".

One of the earliest cross-overs might have been the Avengers showing up in the Fantastic Four #25-26... but others disagree.  They think the Hulk appearing in FF #12 would qualify. Or the FF in Spider-Man #1.


What do you think are the best in the Marvel Comics universe?  What's the early silver age cross-over that floats your boat?  For me, the Iron Man-Submariner cross-over from Tales to Astonish #82  to Tales of Suspense #79  fits that bill nicely.  How about you?

Fantastic Four #25

Fantastic Four #26

Fantastic Four #12

Amazing Spider-Man #1

Daredevil #7

Tales to Astonish #82

Tales of Suspense #79

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Well stated, Clark...

You nailed it on the nose!

ClarkKent_DC said:

Count me among the Gene Colan fans, and one who doesn't think he was miscast on Howard the Duck, because Howard wasn't a typical funny animal book. I've always thought of it as an underground title that somehow got past the poobahs at Marvel; you know DC wouldn't have done it. Despite being a "humor" book, Howard was fundamentally dark, and Colan's pencils worked quite well with it, especially under strong inkers like Tom Palmer or Klaus Janson.

My introduction to Howard the Duck was issue 4, Colan's first on the title, and I loved it!  Moreover, I showed it to my mom, who didn't typically read comics, and she really enjoyed it too.  For a year or so, HTD was one of my favorite comics precisely because of it's rather dark humor.  And while I eventually got issues 2 & 3, and the Treasury Edition with reprints of Howard's previous appearances, and I liked Mayerik's and Brunner's take on Howard, for me Gentleman Gene Colan was the artist for Howard, just as much as he was for Dracula.
 
Kirk G said:

Well stated, Clark...

You nailed it on the nose!

ClarkKent_DC said:

Count me among the Gene Colan fans, and one who doesn't think he was miscast on Howard the Duck, because Howard wasn't a typical funny animal book. I've always thought of it as an underground title that somehow got past the poobahs at Marvel; you know DC wouldn't have done it. Despite being a "humor" book, Howard was fundamentally dark, and Colan's pencils worked quite well with it, especially under strong inkers like Tom Palmer or Klaus Janson.

Moreover, I showed it to my mom, who didn't typically read comics, and she really enjoyed it too.  

You were a brave kid to show your mom, who didn't read comics, HTD. It can't be what she thought comics were, and that didn't have to be a good thing. I'm not sure I would've done that myself. My parents never threw out my comics--they actually kept them in their basement until I bought a house and then drove them across several states to dump them in my new house. And I've still got a lot of those. But I don't think I would've tried to interest them in reading any of them.

Colan had a more realistic look to his pencils, in addition to a lot of mood, which is why he worked well on down-to-Earth stuff like DD. He helped convince us that a normal world had one crazy thing in it, like Dracula or HTD.

-- MSA

I was 14 at the time, my mom 33, and I had a hunch she'd appreciate Gerber's humor, which she did.  In later decades we watched episodes of Black Adder together, and that Rowan Atkinson classis is far more subversive than '70s era Gerber.  Sadly, my mother died just a month ago, on February 28, so we won't be sharing any laughs over anything again.  Sigh.
 
Mr. Silver Age said:

Moreover, I showed it to my mom, who didn't typically read comics, and she really enjoyed it too.  

You were a brave kid to show your mom, who didn't read comics, HTD. It can't be what she thought comics were, and that didn't have to be a good thing. I'm not sure I would've done that myself. My parents never threw out my comics--they actually kept them in their basement until I bought a house and then drove them across several states to dump them in my new house. And I've still got a lot of those. But I don't think I would've tried to interest them in reading any of them.

Colan had a more realistic look to his pencils, in addition to a lot of mood, which is why he worked well on down-to-Earth stuff like DD. He helped convince us that a normal world had one crazy thing in it, like Dracula or HTD.

-- MSA

 

...As far as " showing our parental units (our kind of) comics " , I once , with my father (early-into-mid 90s) saw him reading either 'MAZING MAN or was it AMBUSH BUG from my bstuff --- I , anout that time , gave him Moore's " Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow " , I thought he might like it - If he did nread it , politely , it was um , " Yeah , okay . " or likewise...

I'm sorry for your loss, Fred, I know that can be tough. My mother was 32 when I was born, and I'm about eight years older than you. There wasn't much to show her when I was 14, besides MAD, and at 46, she didn't have a lot of interest in all that hippie stuff. 

When we were born had a big impact on how we view comics, I find. It may affect whether our parents threw out our comics or read some.

-- MSA

,,,As far as something working on super-hero imagery , at a time when we were living to-gether , I remember my father (Gone now , as is my mother , they would be 90 and 87 now .) wanting to see the video of Jim Carrey's " THE MASK " !

(Which , of course , was based upon a previously existing comic book .)

Thanks, Mr. Age.  My mom told me she enjoyed reading Donald Duck comics when she was a kid, and although Gerber & Colan's duck was rather distinct from Carl Bark's ducks, even before Disney's legal team forced Howard to put on pants, she could relate to the more adult humor.  My dad, on the other hand, never got into comics at all; I don't think he even read the funny pages in the newspapers.
 
Mr. Silver Age said:

I'm sorry for your loss, Fred, I know that can be tough. My mother was 32 when I was born, and I'm about eight years older than you. There wasn't much to show her when I was 14, besides MAD, and at 46, she didn't have a lot of interest in all that hippie stuff. 

When we were born had a big impact on how we view comics, I find. It may affect whether our parents threw out our comics or read some.

-- MSA

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