I'm a little surprised this thread didn't carry over from the new old board (you can find it here), but the other night I ran across one of my favorites: the episode of Hill Street Blues in which Officer Joe Coffey is killed.

I was a devoted fan of Hill Street Blues; from Day One, I never failed to watch it, even once, during its first six seasons on the air -- and that was without benefit of a VCR. I wasn't so lucky during the seventh and final season; I've seen most of those, but to this day, there's one I haven't seen, the one in which Henry Goldblume gets carjacked while on his way to a camping trip and begs for his life.

In any event, the one in which Joe Coffey is killed is, like all the other, full of day-in-the-life stuff; his partner, Sgt. Lucy Bates, has become the guardian of a teen named Fabian, but still has to contend with his junkie mother, who keeps demanding cash. Joe overhears Lucy borrowing money from desk Sgt. Stan Jablonski the day after she borrowed money from him, figures out what's going on, and insists they put an end to it. So they confront the mother and tell her this is truly the last time she's getting any more money out of Lucy. Later, Joe presses Lucy to go to City Hall, file the papers and finalize the guardianship. 

After the end of shift, all the guys plan to attend a poker night. While Lucy is shopping for potato chips and such at a neighborhood grocer, Joe tells her the store is out of Garcia y Vega cigars, so he's going to stop in at Al's Smoke Shop up the street. He opens the door, says, "Hey, how you doin'?" to the man behind the counter, and asks if they have any Garcia y Vegas. The man curtly says "No." Joe says, "I think you do -- I see them, in the back." And as he looks toward the back of the store, he sees a pair of feet on the ground, protruding behind the counter. He looks up at the nman behind the counter, looks down again, and before he can reach for his sidearm, the man behind the counter lifts his right arm and fires one shot into his stomach from a large-caliber revolver.

Joe stumbles backward, spins around, and presses his face into the window set in the door, and the man fires a second shot into his back. This shot forces him through the glass and onto the front stoop.

Lucy hears the shots and heads up the street, calling for Joe with her walkie-talkie. Some pedestrian tells her he heard something at the smoke shop. She calls in shots fired, officer down and catches a glimpse of the shooter just before he gets into a van and drives off.

Cut to: a while later, as the sun begins to go down and there's a touch of snow in the air. Detectives Neal Washington and J.D. LaRue are investigating, and Joe's still on the ground, and Lucy complains that he hasn't been covered. Captain Furillo -- who has been on disability because he got shot fairly recently -- comes by, and he and Lucy share a wordless embrace.

One thing about this episode was, at the time, there was a lot of hype and hoopla about Ed Marinaro leaving the show, so I never got to watch it with any surprise at what was going to happen; instead, I could only watch it waiting for it to go down. Which, I suppose, is a legitimate experience, but I might have liked to have been genuinely shocked.

Any how ... anybody have any favorite TV bits of their own to share?


Views: 827

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I have a new one that I just saw for the first time an half hour ago. Dolores had me watch the entire season of Glee over the last two weeks, and we just watched the finale. I'm going to include spoiler space on this one since it is still relatively recent and the DVD isn't even out yet.









The club has made it to regionals after all sorts of obstacles only to find that Will Schuester's arch-nemesis Sue is one of the judges and they are certain she will sabotage their chances of winning, causing the club to be dissolved by the Principal.

After they sang their collective heart out AND rushed to the hospital to deliver Quinn's baby, Sue and the other judges gather to decide the winner. At first Sue is completely in character, ready to make demands that New Dimensions lose, but after hearing all the other judges run down the kids from HER school, she begins to defend them, slightly at first, then more vehemently, only to have the rest of the judges turn on her as well, calling her a "Lima Loser." New Dimensions ends up coming in last, but in a quick flashback to the voting, we see that Sue voted New Dimensions for first place. Later, we find that she has gone up to bat for the kids and secured the club another year's worth of funding, earning her Schuester's grudging appreciation and admiration.

That was worth the viewing right there, but what had me actually choking up was when the kids requested Schuester's presence in the rehearsal room and thanked him for all he had done for them even though at that point they thought their group was done. As Mr. Schuester sits there in front of them, the glee club sings him "To Sir, With Love" as everyone in the room barely succeeds in making through the number without breaking down in tears.

Emotionally manipulative? Absolutely. So what? Sometimes it's quite cathartic to allow yourself to be emotionally manipulated.
Mark S. Ogilvie said:
That made me think of the short lived Sledge Hammer show. Sledge is turned into a Robo-cop by a scientist and called "Hammeroid" and uses his new Xray vision to compliment his parter Dory on her underwear. It fit the show perfectly.

Mark


Ah, Sledge Hammer. The moment when his partner Dori told Captain Trunk, "Trust him, he knows what he's doing" had me bust a gut laughing.
I'm a big fan of Glee. It can be wildly uneven, doing things that are stunningly wonderful and stunningly awful from one commercial break to the next if not both at the same time, but overall, its usually a fun, rousing hour to watch. When it's doing things well, it's really, really good.

The season finale hit on all cylinders. The whole rollercoaster of believing that the fix was in and the kids were defeated within sight of the finish line, to deciding, dammit, we're going to go out fighting! to the sheer joy of being on stage doing their best, to the hope that maybe they really truly had a shot to, frankly, getting their butts kicked by Vocal Adrenaline, to the deflation of losing -- boy, what a ride! And that cross-cutting between "Bohemian Rhapsody" and Quinn delivering her baby was audacious, but it worked!

And the business with Sue Sylvester in the judges' room: She's always lorded it over the school, but away from her own turf, she got a blunt reminder that she may be a big fish in the small pond back home, but out here, she's a guppy, not a shark. But, interestingly enough, the fact that what went on in the judges' room is private meant that she came out looking like she sabotaged Mr. Scheuster and the kids when, in truth, she had little sway over the outcome. Nicely done.
Doctor Hmmm? said:
Well, if we're talkin' "Cheers", I can't do better than the first season episode "The Coach's Daughter."


This is my favourite "Coach moment" in the entire series. The Good Mrs. Benson interprets it differently than I do. If I recall her point correctly, she sees it as the addle-brained Coach viewed his daughter and his late wife through rose-coloured glasses, imagining them to be more beautiful that what they really were.

My opinion closely mirrors yours. I think that it's one of the few truly lucid perspectives that Ernie Pantuso ever had.

It's like this. Lisa, from the time she was a little girl and especially as she moved into adolescence, looked in the mirror and knew she wasn't beautiful, or even pretty. Yet, all of her life, her father, Coach, would tell her how beautiful she was. Lisa took that as simply a father trying to make his little girl feel better about herself. He was being kind and nothing more.

What this scene reveals to her is that Coach really did see her as beautiful, as he did her mother. Lisa doesn't realise this until Coach says that he never noticed how much she looked like her mother before. The truth that Coach understood is that the one you love truly is beautiful. Perhaps not in the conventional sense, but that's not what counts.

What Coach knew, and it's astounding in its clarity, is: love doesn't rely on beauty; beauty relies on love.
(I'm sure that I've talked about this before on the old message boards. Bear with me. Or is that bare with me? Funny thing, I've heard that expression so often but don't think I've ever seen it in print. But I digress.)

I often wonder if those who praise either screen version of M*A*S*H have read the novel that started the whole thing. I don't have a preference of TV over movie, probably because so many other stories I like have multiple versions (Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy, DC's multiple Earths, James Bond, etc). Both movie and TV take a backseat to Dr. H. Richard Hornberger's 1968 book (written under the pen name Richard Hooker). It irks me that he is almost never given credit for starting the whole thing. In everything I've seen and read about M*A*S*H, I think he's been mentioned once. The movie is a decent adaption but lacks much of the emotions of the story. The first season of the TV series has stories lifted right from the book (and by extension, the movie) but no credit is given.
One running gag from Police Squad: At some point in each episode, Lt. Frank Drebin would drive up to the police station and his car would knock over a trash can on the curb. In the first episode, it was one trash can. In the second episode, it was two. In the third episode, it was three. In the fourth episode, it was four ...
Mark, only two of the sequels were written by the original author (M*A*S*H Goes to Maine and M*A*S*H Mania) and they're both very good. The second sequel wasn't so much a novel as a collection of short stories, one of which makes me cry every time I read it. It's that well written.

All the others have Richard Hooker as the co-author but he didn't write a word of them. A couple of the early ones are OK but most were trash.
I remember this bit from "The Return of the Man From U.N.C.L.E." TV movie from the 80s (??). Ilya Kuriakin is tied up with another captive, hung by the wrists. He says, in the old days, he had a blade in his watch. The other prisoner asks where it is now and Ilya says it's in his shoe! Aghast, the other asks what do they call that? and Ilya replies, dryly, "Progress."

Also Scotty's bar fight with the Klingons in The Trouble With Tribbles. Great acting, great dialogue, great brawl and Cyrano Jones copping a drink!
Philip Portelli said:
I remember this bit from "The Return of the Man From U.N.C.L.E." TV movie from the 80s (??). Ilya Kuriakin is tied up with another captive, hung by the wrists. He says, in the old days, he had a blade in his watch. The other prisoner asks where it is now and Ilya says it's in his shoe! Aghast, the other asks what do they call that? and Ilya replies, dryly, "Progress."

Also Scotty's bar fight with the Klingons in The Trouble With Tribbles. Great acting, great dialogue, great brawl and Cyrano Jones copping a drink!

Whichj reminds me of the DS9 episode "Triaqls and Tribbles" - not omly for the seasless integrating of Sisko, Dax, Bashir, O'Brien and Worf, but for the scene where they are in the bar as the Klingons walk in, and the other three turn to Worf to ask why they ar edifferent. His response - "We do not discuss it with outsiders."
"Trials and Tribble-ations," Mike.

And as a long-time Star Trek fan, I hate that moment. It was generally accepted in fandom that Klingons were always meant to look like that but that the original series couldn't afford such elaborate costuming. Then along comes "Trials and Tribble-ations" (an otherwise, ahem, stellar episode) and it becomes official that there are different looking Klingons. This is despite the fact that we'd already seen Klingons from the original series on Deep Space 9 and with the newer Klingon appearance! All they had to do was keep ignoring the difference and all would have been well. We'd also have been spared a rather lousy Enterprise two-parter explaining how the differences came to be.
I took that moment as a nice in-joke; I think what spoils it, if anything, is the fanboyish belief that every discrepancy has to be elaborately explained, preferably in a multi-part tale, with footnotes (Avengers Forever, anyone?).
I really liked Avengers Forever.

ClarkKent_DC said:
I took that moment as a nice in-joke; I think what spoils it, if anything, is the fanboyish belief that every discrepancy has to be elaborately explained, preferably in a multi-part tale, with footnotes (Avengers Forever, anyone?).

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service