Carmine Infantino's passing away hits me the same way that Julie Schwartz's or Curt Swan's passing away hit me. These were giants among comic book creators, men who shaped my very childhood with their wonderful stories for DC Comics, and nobody has ever come along to supplant them from my memories.

I started reading comic books in 1966, so in some way I guess I missed being there for most of Infantino's long and classic run as a pencil artist for DC. He would be promoted to art director in 1967, and other than a few covers here and there, his art vanished from DC for a long time (though of course his presence was felt on every comic, whether as art director or his eventual ascension to publisher). But for that magical Go-Go Checks era of 1966-67, I got to enjoy a lot of Infantino's work on The Flash, which quickly became one of my favorite DC titles. (For some reason, I never really got into Batman or Detective in the Silver Age, even though the "Batman" TV show was directly responsible for me buying comics in the first place.)

Here are the front covers to my favorite Infantino Flash stories from that period. Coincidentally (or maybe not so coincidentally), they're the last three issues he did (until the 1980s, anyway). Rest in peace, Carmine Infantino.

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You sparked my curiosity, so I looked up Roger Moore on IMDB. The movie you remember is CROSSPLOT (1969). There was moire info on Amazon here.

Kirk G said:

I think there were good examples of this in the Roger Moore vehicle...oh, nuts, I can't recall the name of the movie. It featured models and fashion photography and a runaway model who was presumed dead....

I think there were good examples of this in the Roger Moore vehicle..."Crossplot". It featured models and fashion photography and a runaway model who was presumed dead, and at one point, Moore walks down a gangplank to the houseboat and the girl flips him into the drink.  he eventually dries out and showers on board, and produces the contract for her to look at.  And since his clothes are absolutely soaked, she dresses him out of the closet in the Teddy boy orange velure suite with ruffles, and as he comes up the gangplank, he looks up to see the villain of the piece standing there in an identical Teddy outfit, and Moore says "Oh Snap" just as he's wacked over the head cold.

Later it becomes clear that the "villain" has been hiding the model, not kidnapping her, to protect her from some other mobsters who are trying to kill her.  And the movie ends with a high speed chase through an English manner grounds and the Teddy boy getting shot and left behind to draw them off.

 

Thanks Richard Willis for doing the legwork to ID this movie for us.



Mr. Silver Age said:

The "Teddy" reference was a shortened form of the Rockers interest in wearing clothes reflecting the Edwardian Age, with ruffles and fancy suits. How that migrated into black jackets, t-shirts and jeans is hard to say, assuming we're understanding it right. I'm not sure even they understood it, though.

-- MSA

It was pointed out in what I read that CROSSPLOT was made right after his SAINT TV series and before he took over the Bond role.

The Hooded Hangman story from Detective was one of the earliest Batman books I read. Although I think I was still just looking at the pictures at this stage.

To further beat the subject to death, I discovered that CROSSPLOT is available on Netflix in both DVD form and as streaming. I see most of my movies these days for the combined DVD/Streaming price of less than $17 a month (unlimited). If you only want one service or the other it is less than $9 a month. I added it to my list as it sounds like something my wife and I would both enjoy. Anyone who has broadband should try the 30-day free trial. 

For big Infantino fans, two of his art pages from the Silver Age popped up on eBay today. They're not all that expensive, but that's because they're pretty unexciting:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Carmine-Infantino-Silver-Age-Original-Art-S...

and

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Carmine-Infantino-Silver-Age-Original-Art-S... 

I'll actually be interested to see if they sell, as I'm not sure they will.

-- MSA

The thing that really surprised me is that the Hooded hangman is revealed to be Superman... but I can't remember what the motive for this deception  was...  I must have just been looking at the pictures as well...just flipping through the books on the spinner rack...

Kirk, that wasn't Superman.  I don't want to reveal who it was.  Not because it was anybody we already knew...it wasn't...but because it is a good story and worth reading. 

Kirk G said:

The thing that really surprised me is that the Hooded hangman is revealed to be Superman... but I can't remember what the motive for this deception  was...  I must have just been looking at the pictures as well...just flipping through the books on the spinner rack...

"Holy Gallows!"  Must have been during the TV Show.

Well, it sure wasn't Alfred.. and I think we can rule out Robin in a muscle suit...

 

As I said, it isn't any cast member.  The villain and his real identity was just someone introduced for this one story only.

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