Mile High Comics is having an auction of stuff they had lying around, and one of the items is so cool that Chuck Rozanski is opening the bidding to people by phone. It's the complete color guide to FF #88 in its original folder.

He expects it to go for $1,000-$2,000, which is a wide range, but I'm betting it may go higher. Color guides aren't that in-demand, but a complete guide--in its original folder--for a key SA comic, I think could be in demand. It's not original art, but it was in the Marvel offices in this form (and was probably colored by Marie Severin), so that's got a coolness factor--and it's cheaper than any one page of the original art by at least a factor of 10, so in that regard, it's actually cheap.

So if you've got some cash lying around, take a look:

http://www.milehighcomics.com/newsletter/111413retail.html (I updated the link to where it ended up after it was the first newsletter item).

-- MSA

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I wouldn't call FF #88 a "key silver age book", but it is almost the end of Jack Kirby's run at the top of his game... which ends about #94...IMHO...

Still, if you've never seen one of these, it'd be a very unique collectible!

 

Very interesting. What would the next stage of the colouring process have been?

If only I had one PowerBall on Wednesday.

It has been a while since I've seen a color guide up for sale (not that I have been looking for them mind you). I've found them pretty interesting though.

This being a whole issue is very cool. I agree with MSA I would expect to break $2000.

Just reminded me I have a copy of Marvel Age 13, 1984 that had an article "How to color comics the marvel way", complete with color charts and a character colored 9 different ways. If I get a chance I'll post it.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

It has been a while since I've seen a color guide up for sale (not that I have been looking for them mind you). I've found them pretty interesting though.

This being a whole issue is very cool. I agree with MSA I would expect to break $2000.

I wouldn't call FF #88 a "key silver age book",

I meant “comic” as in title, not specific issue. Even so, #88 was late in the run, but it’s still a Lee-Kirby SA issue, and the guide shows some of Kirby’s notes in the margins, so that’s pretty cool, especially for an entire issue. I'd rather have a three-year-earlier FF, but I'd buy this over a three-year-earlier TTA, but maybe that's just me.

You seem to be implying that Kirby’s last issues on FF are not some of the finest comic books ever produced, and that’s just crazy talk.

Be that as it may, I’m going to stand by my statement that Lee-Kirby FF was a key SA comic and let the chips fall where they may. I’m a man of my convictions!

Very interesting. What would the next stage of the colouring process have been?

Here’s Adrienne Roy explaining how she did that thing she did

http://www.ebay.com/gds/Color-Guides-/10000000001552849/g.html

-- MSA

A unique piece of Silver Age Marvel history - very cool. If I had a couple thousand dollars I didn't know what to do with, I'd place a bid.

That is pretty cool.

Thanks, Mr SA. I found an account at Wikipedia of the colour separating process here. I find it surprising that the guide should have a slightly sloppy look (as with the sky in the second panel on the second page above), but colourists could achieve complex effects (as on the cover of The Atom #21).

The eBay and Wikipedia references were very informative. I was particularly intrigued by the photographic process used to separate the colorist's work into four colors for the printing process. It would seem to indicate that any coloring error is usually the fault of the colorist, since all the color-separators are doing is photographing the colorist's work. I like that Ms Roy would follow the story in order to use the appropriate colors. Sometimes I used to see bad guys' clothing change from panel to panel, so this would have been the colorist's fault, not the separator's. When a panel showed Batman's costume either pink or pale blue, the missing color to his pale purple/faux gray must have been an error in the separation process.

Ms Roy says her last step was to indicate the colour percentages, but I don't get why that step was necessary. Wasn't the information all there in the grayscale images?

I think the impression of sloppiness in the eBay photo is mostly the reflection of the plastic sleeve in the photo.

The color effects on covers like your example and my example, here, obviously are more sophisticated than the interiors of the comics. Is this mainly due to the extra time spent on coloring the covers using the same separation process, is it a different process, or is it because the paper stock for the covers enables better coloring?

Luke Blanchard said:

Thanks, Mr SA. I found an account at Wikipedia of the colour separating process here. I find it surprising that the guide should have a slightly sloppy look (as with the sky in the second panel on the second page above), but colourists could achieve complex effects (as on the cover of The Atom #21).

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