Going Through My Graphic Novels: Cull or Keep? (SPOILERS)

I've got rather alot of graphic novels, most of which sit on my bookshelves or in boxes in my closets from one year to the next, never being looked at. So, I've decided to go through them all, re-reading each one and deciding whether to keep it or to cull it. Culls will be donated to the local public library.

 

As I re-read each one, I'm going to try to present my impression of each one, and then announce the verdict: Cull or Keep?

 

There will be spoilers here, so beware. I most likely won't read one every day, but I 'm going to try to keep up a steady pace.

 

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The former is his original origin, the second is from the Ty Templeton special.

So the second is his post-Crisis origin? Makes laughing at his shenanigans kind of cruel.

At DC, Mopee rules over all. There was a post-Crisis account of Plas's origin in Secret Origins #30. Woozy appeared in it, so it may have used his Golden Age origin: but I can't say.

Wasn't there a story where one of the chemicals Barry Allen used to become the Flash was called Mopee?

I believe so. Supposedly Mopee was a djinn of some sort, perhaps kin to Johnny Thunder's Thunderbolt.

He's a meta-vampire who lurks in the interstices between realities and feeds on continuity. When he plunges his fangs into a character's neck his continuity is transformed. With each attack his thirst increases. His victims initially recovered quickly after his attacks (Flash #167, Superman #258, Action Comics #370, Superboy #158, Forever People #10, World's Finest #223, #227, Superman #330), but with each retcon he grew stronger (Flash #203, The Saga of Swamp Thing #21) and now his thirst can only be slaked by the destruction and recreation of whole universes.

And people have been blaming Superboy-Prime for all of that.

Next is Doom Patrol: The Painting That Ate Paris, by Grant Morrison and Richard Case & John Nyberg.

 

This collects Doom Patrol #26-34, and covers the Patrol's encounter with the Brotherhood of Dada and the Fifth Horseman, Cliff's descent into Crazy Jane's psyche, their battle with the Cult of the Unwritten Book, Cliff's body trying to kill him, and the Brain and Monsieur Mallah revealing their true feelings for one another.

 

You know, I'd forgotten I owned this book, or I would've made some mentions of it when I did my thread on the Arcudi Doom Patrol a while back.  That said, this is quite good, filled with lots of entertaining Morrisonian weirdness and pop cultural references, including a villain who references the Sour Grapes Bunch and a mystic oracle who quotes the Mister Ed theme. Fun stuff, that I had no trouble following , for once.

 

Cull or Keep?: This one's definitely a keeper!

 

Finally an explanation of the Nu52.

Luke Blanchard said:

He's a meta-vampire who lurks in the interstices between realities and feeds on continuity. When he plunges his fangs into a character's neck his continuity is transformed. With each attack his thirst increases. His victims initially recovered quickly after his attacks (Flash #167, Superman #258, Action Comics #370, Superboy #158, Forever People #10, World's Finest #223, #227, Superman #330), but with each retcon he grew stronger (Flash #203, The Saga of Swamp Thing #21) and now his thirst can only be slaked by the destruction and recreation of whole universes.

And he hates old people. Jay Garrick and Alan Scott should not be younger than we are!

See how you feel when the President is younger than you!

...OK , now dig this.........

  I started reading comic books in 1966 . I bought this issue , and probably EVERY (or close to it) issue of this series , which I think we can call " PLAZ " for easy distinction , since , IIRC (as , obviously , for everything I say here ~ especially since , well , see below ~ ) , that is how P.M.'s name was abbreviated in it .

  I had bought the DIAL H FOR HERO issue of HOUSE OF MYSTERY with a story that " tried out " this PM , as well ! Proably one of my mythological " first few dozen comics " . (and probably my first Robby) .

  I have long thought (though fom memory at this time I don't have them) that this series is HIGHLY underrated !

  No   , quite so , It Isn't Jack Cole . That is indisputable . Nobody else but Jack Cole IS Jack Cole .

  I recall it as quite a funny bit of 1960s Middle-Aged Guy humor .

  No , I imagine the editors weren't thinking that their Plaz would in fact not be the " real " Plas when they started the DC series , I imagine they came up with that later .Editors of old , as I'm sure you realize , did not think of continuity the way that we do (And the Robby Reed story's continuity issues I daresay didn't occur to them either .)

   Plaz's sidekick was indeed not Woozy , this old-style idea of an Ivy League/preppie " nerd " . Editors of old , as I'm sure you all realize , did not think of continuity the way that we do   I want to say he was ~ Now I think I've remembered !!!!!!!!!!! Gordon Trueblood III !!!!!!!!!!! :-)

 

 

 

 



Philip Portelli said:

Despite what the cover says, when DC put out Plastic Man #1 (D'66), this was NOT the original Plas! In #7, we learnt that he was really Plastic Man II, the son of the Plas who supposedly debuted in Police Comics #1, complete with an elderly Woozy Winks. When the series ended with #10, Plas, Jr. appeared in Brave & Bold and got more depressing with each guest shot!

When Plastic Man was revived in the 70s with #11, it starred the "real" Plas and Woozy, young again while Junior stretched into Comic Book Limbo!

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