Going Through My Graphic Novels: Cull or Keep? (SPOILERS)

I've got rather alot of graphic novels, most of which sit on my bookshelves or in boxes in my closets from one year to the next, never being looked at. So, I've decided to go through them all, re-reading each one and deciding whether to keep it or to cull it. Culls will be donated to the local public library.

 

As I re-read each one, I'm going to try to present my impression of each one, and then announce the verdict: Cull or Keep?

 

There will be spoilers here, so beware. I most likely won't read one every day, but I 'm going to try to keep up a steady pace.

 

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And another:  Dropsie Avenue: The Neighborhood, by Will Eisner. This was the first Eisner I ever read, and it's quite a good one.  He follows the history of a street in the South Bronx form about 1870 to about 1970, and it's more interesting and engaging than any super-hero stuff. I remember that when Bob Kane died, Eisner said that Kane had treated comics as an extension of Hollywood spectacle, whereas he (Eisner) treated them as literature.  This book is as good an example of comics-as-literature as I can recall seeing.

Cull or Keep?: Keep!

Camelot 3000 is a huge favorite of mine. I haven't reread it for a few years, but the last time I did, I had a similar experience to yours. It didn't blow my mind like it originally did, but it still was a crackin' good yarn. It was probably my first deep dip into the King Arthur legend, although I was familiar with the characters beforehand.

And yes, the last few issues of Camelot 3000 were released later and later, with almost a year between issues 11 and 12. And we're all the better for it. Because if they pulled in Jose Delbo or Chuck Patton to wrap up the last few issues on a decent schedule, it would have been forgotten before the 80s had even ended.

Hootenanny? Isn't that what you get when you cross an owl with a goat?

It seems such an obvious gimmick, to tell the story of one these "sleeping kings" re-awakening. Has anyone else ever done it?

I finally read Camelot 3000 a couple of years ago in trade form. It certainly was ahead of its time. I'm glad I didn't have to wait long periods between issues. That was ahead of its time too.

I read a comment somewhere that Arthur was portrayed as stupid for thinking that the alien invaders were demons. I guess in the sixth century he didn't read much science fiction or he would have known they were aliens..

That's what happens when people today try to depict people in the far past. They give them ideas and concepts that would completely blow their minds, like the wizard in Conan the Barbarian#1 looking into the future despite being warned not to look too far ahead, and going insane when he saw an Apollo spacewalk. It's like the stories making princesses into smart aleck warriors. Real princesses did very little in public besides faint, and one that acted modern would be considered crazy or bewitched.

Well it is fiction, so making princesses act anyway you want is fair game since they aren't princesses who existed in anything like they did here. In those same stories with smart aleck princess you might also have a dragon, a knight who wears his full armor 24/7, and a demon summoning wizard. So, if I can accept all of that I can surely accept a female character with some personality. Plus, in which history did a princess do little more than faint in public? We must have read different history books.

Ron M. said:

That's what happens when people today try to depict people in the far past. They give them ideas and concepts that would completely blow their minds, like the wizard in Conan the Barbarian#1 looking into the future despite being warned not to look too far ahead, and going insane when he saw an Apollo spacewalk. It's like the stories making princesses into smart aleck warriors. Real princesses did very little in public besides faint, and one that acted modern would be considered crazy or bewitched.

Alfie McHootenanny said:

His parents are Irish, father a signpainter from Dublin I think. He grew up in Luton, England.

We're a broad church! ;-)

I might be wrong but was Camelot 3000 the first main stream book that had a traditional "damsel in distress" become a warrior? It's old hat today almost to the point that it seems biased against boys!

I remember Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves where Marion defeats Robin in a swordfight but still needs him to rescue her at the end!

Try wearing a corset that gives you a 14 inch waist and see if you don't faint a lot. In which history books did princess even come out in public outside of court ceremonies or to wave their handkerchiefs out their carriage's window while they traveled through the kingdom from their winter castle to their summer castle. There were whole lists of rules prohibiting them from anything, including dressing themselves, which their maid would think was a great insult to her. And most of what they learned was meant to make them entertaiining so they wouldn't embarrass their future husband when he threw parties. She probably couldn't cook since the cook would chase anyone that got in out of their kitchen. Of course, the king got the same business. Everybody with a problem would ask him to solve it, and the line of people complaining about something or other would go through the castle and down the road. And only the poor wear trousers. Fall off your horse and everyone gets a laugh at your expense since it's likely you've just mooned the entire court. You don't hire somebody to wear bells on his cap and tell you bad jokes if you're happy.l

 

Ron said:

Try wearing a corset that gives you a 14 inch waist and see if you don't faint a lot. In which history books did princess even come out in public outside of court ceremonies or to wave their handkerchiefs out their carriage's window while they traveled through the kingdom from their winter castle to their summer castle

There is a ton of history out there of princesses and other female royalty who did so much more than that.  Besides that, your complaint about fictional characters not acting the way you think the real life counterparts is  ridiculous when so many more "unrealistic"  things occur in those stories.  No idea why you would even bring it up.

Most of these women were royalty.

All of these warrior princesses were.

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