Going Through My Graphic Novels: Cull or Keep? (SPOILERS)

I've got rather alot of graphic novels, most of which sit on my bookshelves or in boxes in my closets from one year to the next, never being looked at. So, I've decided to go through them all, re-reading each one and deciding whether to keep it or to cull it. Culls will be donated to the local public library.

 

As I re-read each one, I'm going to try to present my impression of each one, and then announce the verdict: Cull or Keep?

 

There will be spoilers here, so beware. I most likely won't read one every day, but I 'm going to try to keep up a steady pace.

 

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If you don't trust his sources, you can always research it yourself.

It wasn't Wikipedia that I checked, but  that's as may be. I did do some more research, but didn't find anything definitive. Anyway, Batman-Judge Dredd: Die Laughing cme in two volumes, both written by Alan Grant and John Wagner. Art on volume one was done by Glenn Fabry with Jim Murray and Jason Brashill, Jim Murray is credited for volume two alone. This tends to make the story somewhat uneven, artistically.

 

The story itself involves Bats and Dredd battling the Joker and the Dark Judges, to keep them from slaughtering a cult of hedonists. It's an OK story, but nothing earth-shattering, to my mind.

 

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

Read Batman/Punisher: Lake of Fire, byDennis O'Neil, Barry Kitson and James Pascoe, in which the Azrael Batman and the Punisher team up to battle Jigsaw, who is being secretly sponsored by the Joker.It's an OK story, considering I never liked this version of the Batman.

Cull or Keep?; Keep.

Next I read Punisher/Batman: Deadly Knights, by Chuck Dixon, John Romita, Jr. and Klaus Janson. This time, Bruce is back, as he and Frank once again tangle with the Joker and Jigsaw. Another OK story, an interesting look at how different Batmen react to the Punisher. This is the one with the much-ridiculed ending in which Batman lets two mass-murderers escape so that they won't kill each other. Still, overall, it was fairly enjoyable.

Cull or Keep?; Keep.

Man, you are a lot more forgiving than me. When I want a Batman/Punisher comic I want Bruce in the suit...maybe Dick. I would have chunked this one...in fact I may have.

The Baron said:

Read Batman/Punisher: Lake of Fire, byDennis O'Neil, Barry Kitson and James Pascoe, in which the Azrael Batman and the Punisher team up to battle Jigsaw, who is being secretly sponsored by the Joker.It's an OK story, considering I never liked this version of the Batman.

Cull or Keep?; Keep.

I think it might be the only comic I still own that has the Azrael Batman in it.

Next up is Gotham by Gaslight, by Brian Augustyn, Michael Mignola and P. Craig Russell, an Elseworlds from back before they were called that. This is one of my all-time favorites, a very atmospheric tale of a Victorian Batman. Of course, a guy can dress up in a batsuit in just about any era, so the character lends itself to these kinds of re-imaginings. This is good stuff. Well-drawn, too.

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

Finally, I read Batman: Master of the Air, by Brian Augustyn and Eduardo Barreto, a sequel to the above in which the Victorian Batman Battles a science villain/air pirate. This o e is Ok, if not quite as good as its predecessor. Barreto's art is good, as always.

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

Re-read The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - Century: 2009, by Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill, which we discussed at length here. I will say that reading it the second time I don't it quite so disturbing as I did when I first read it. A little time and distance, I suppose.  At least now I know what the Malcolm Tucker reference was about!

Not much new to  say about it except that it seems to me that it presents a very bleak picture of present-day Britain. One gets the feeling that Moore isn't too happy with the current state of the UK.

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

 

Next up is Ministry of Space, by Warren Ellis and Chris Weston. On the one hand, it's a wish fulfillment fantasy, presenting an alternate history where Britain wins the space race, building a new empire on the Moon and Mars, but at the same time showing that this new empire was built on blood and murder (as all empires are), and we end seeing that racial segregation still exists in 21st Century Britain in this timeline. It's all very improbable -the idea that the Americans and the Soviets would just sit back and let the British take over the solar System is absurd - but the story carries one along anyway.

The art  in this is exquisite,  and very reminiscent of the old Dan Dare stories, which suits the story perfectly.

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

 

Next was Batman/Daredevil - King of New York, by Alan Grant and Eduardo Barreto. In this one, Bats and DD get caught up in a conflict between the Kingpin and the Scarecrow. OK but nothing special. Not something I feel a need to hang onto.

Cull or Keep?: Cull.

Next I read Justice Riders, by Chuck Dixon, J.H. Williams III and Mick Gray. An Elseworlds which re-imagines the JLA as a band of gunslingers in the Old West. Well-written and well-drawn, this is an entertaining little story. Quite alot of fun.

Cull or Keep?: Keep.

 

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