Now that the show has debuted, what are your thoughts?

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That's when the Wayne Foundation came into being, after Alfred "got better," which was for the Batman show.

The Wayne Enterprises (non-charitable) is the main question.

Ron M. said:

There was something like a Wayne Foundation in the Adam West show.

That's two weeks in a row now they've teased us with the "Batcave."

Ron M. said:

There was something like a Wayne Foundation in the Adam West show.



Richard Willis said:

That's when the Wayne Foundation came into being, after Alfred "got better," which was for the Batman show.

The Wayne Enterprises (non-charitable) is the main question.

Right. The Wayne Foundation is a charitable organization, beginning as "The Alfred Foundation" after Alfred was killed. (Why was it given Alfred's first name? Beats me. I think back then it wasn't clear what Alfred's last name was.) But somewhere along the way -- and what I'm getting at -- is when was it that the Wayne family became like the Stark family, manufacturing stuff? That wasn't always the case.

In a word: "Diversification." :)

I always thought it was odd his first name rather than his last was used. I think the original name was "The Alfred Memorial Foundation." Granted, they would have had to drop the work "memorial" after he turned up alive (and that would have been the perfect opportunity to change the name to "The Pennyworth Foundation"), but I think it's a slap in the face that his name was removed entirely.

Also, it's kind of creepy the way they brought him back. He was not embalmed, but rather placed inside a refrigerated coffin. He was heard groaning from within the mausoleum by the scientist who tranformed him into the Outsider, but essentially, Bruce Wayne had his faithful family retainer buried alive.

Oh, "spoilers."

Perhaps Alfred asked to have his name removed.

Alfred & Bruce may well have found it creepy to "memorialize" someone who wasn't currently dead.  On that note, I've always wondered exactly what happened to Aunt May's headstone when she stopped  being dead?  We still see Uncle Ben's from time to time, but the one that sat next to it during the time she was dead (and presumably the body of that incredibly dedicated actress who continued to pose as May right up to her dying breath) is no longer there.

But seriously, I suspect the reason the Alfred Foundation was renamed was to avoid drawing any attention to the whole "Alfred was dead, but then he got better--in a story that didn't make a lick of sense!" thing.  That was not a storyline anyone would want to draw attention to.

To the best of my knowledge, the first time Alfred's last name was given as Pennyworth was in "Angel... or Devil?" in Batman #216 (Nov. 1969), which introduced his brother Wilfred and niece Daphne.

Right. The Wayne Foundation is a charitable organization, beginning as "The Alfred Foundation" after Alfred was killed . . . . But somewhere along the way---and what I'm getting at---is when was it that the Wayne family became like the Stark family, manufacturing stuff? That wasn't always the case.      

                                                                                       --ClarkKent_DC

I think the original name was "The Alfred Memorial Foundation."   

                                                                                        --Jeff of Earth-J  


Ah, comic-book stuff.  Now, that's what I know.

CK asks an interesting question.  The answer doesn't come readily to mind because the emergence of Bruce Wayne as a  businessman and corporate bigwig took place through a gradual evolution.  I wish I had more time to-day to devote to this, but here's what I've got so far . . . . 

First, as to Jeff's point:  no, actually, the original name---as stated by Bruce Wayne and displayed on the model, in Detective Comics # 328 (Jun., 1964)---was the Alfred Foundation.  I don't know how soon afterward (because I didn't have time to check), but at some point, the foundation became alternately referenced as "the Alfred Memorial Foundation".  This nomenclature is especially prominent in the story which returned Alfred to the land of the living.

In "The Inside Story of the Outsider", from Detective Comics # 356 (Oct., 1966), the Batman says to Brandon Crawford, the scientist who inadvertently turned Alfred into the villainous Outsider (boldface mine):

"Go see Bruce Wayne at the Alfred Memorial Founda---er---that name will have to be changed---perhaps to the Wayne Foundation!"

The existence of the Alfred---later, the Wayne---Foundation had the benefit of providing an additional excuse to involve Bruce Wayne in situations.  He was no longer just a millionnaire playboy, he was also a trustee, and later, the chairman, of the Foundation.  That rôle expanded the number and types of persons with whom Wayne could plausibly come into contact.  But for the duration of the Silver Age, Wayne was shown to be on the periphery of the Foundation and not engaged in the day-to-day operations.

That changed with the advent of the Bronze Age, albeit slowly.  The most marked upgrading of Wayne's status with the Foundation was shown in "One Bullet Too Many", from Batman # 217 (Dec., 1969).  This is the issue in which Dick Grayson leaves for college and Bruce Wayne shuts down Wayne Manor (and the Batcave below), moving his operation to downtown Gotham City.  We see Wayne taking up residence in a penthouse atop the Wayne Foundation Building.  He also uses his office in the building to establish a charitable programme, called Victims, Incorporated, to help those who have suffered from violent crime.

(Victims, Inc.---alternately known as "V.I.P." [Victims, Inc. Program]---was intended to be the basis of the Gotham Gangbuster's involvement in future storylines.  Actually, the whole V.I.P. idea was dropped and forgotten within a three or four issues.)

That's what got Bruce Wayne's foot in the door to the business world.  Over the next several years, stories showed him more and more involved with Foundation business---until the next thing you knew, he was the C.E.O.

As for when the Wayne Foundation gave way to Wayne Enterprises, CK, I'm having a devil of a time pinpointing that.  Or for that matter, nailing down the first time that Wayne Enterprises was referenced. An on-line check hasn't proved very helpful.  In most cases, a website's reference to "Wayne Enterprises", with regard to an early Bronze-Age tale is simply the writer's choice of expression, rather than an actual citation from the story.

Comic Vine, which purports to be a reference site, states that the first mention of Wayne Enterprises occurred in "This Murder Has Been . . . Pre-Recorded", from Batman # 220 (Mar., 1970). Unfortunately, this is one of few issues of Batman from the time which I don't possess.  So I could not directly reference it and confirm Comic Vine's citation.

I spent about an hour or so going through my old stacks, trying to find early references to Wayne Enterprises.  The two earliest mentions that I was actually able to lay eyes on came from "The 50-Story Killer", from The Brave and the Bold # 113 (Jun.-Jul., 1974) and "The Family That Fled the Earth", from World's Finest Comics # 234 (Dec., 1975).  The latter story describes a subsidiary of Wayne Enterprises that builds products for the U.S. space programme, while the former tale clearly places Bruce Wayne in the rôle of a corporate C.E.O.  The B&B tale has a killer bent on vengeance against the Batman, but, instead, takes it out on Wayne (because the killer doesn't know how to find the Masked Manhunter).  The killer's scheme involves poisoning all of the Wayne employees present in the Wayne Foundation Building, while demanding a $27,400,000.00 ransom from Wayne.  (That sum was stated to be the entirety of Wayne's personal fortune, at the time.)

Even so, it took time for the idea of "Wayne Enterprises" to eclipse the Wayne Foundation.  "Dark Messenger of Mercy", from Batman # 307 (Jan., 1979), introduces Lucius Fox as Wayne's number-two man, yet all of the references in that story still state "the Wayne Foundation".

That's as far as I was able to uncover.  I'll keep looking.

Hope this helps.

Bob Ingersoll's recent column has some relevance to this discussion.

Bob Buethe said:

Bob Ingersoll's recent column has some relevance to this discussion.

He's made that point before -- that Bruce Wayne is stealing from his company whenever he appropriates Wayne Enterprises products for Batman's use.

True, but the paragraph that caught my attention was:

Then in the late 70s, something changed. Batman got retconned so that he wasn’t just the rich son of a rich doctor. Starting with Batman v1 #307, Bruce Wayne was the head of Wayne Enterprises. He was a captain of industry. The latest scion of a long-standing family of incredibly rich industrialists that dated back to the 19th Century when Judge Solomon Wayne started up WayneCorp and used the money he earned to found Gotham City. Over the ensuing decades – through Alan Wayne, Kenneth Wayne, Patrick Wayne, Thomas Wayne, and up to Bruce Wayne – the family fortune never waned.


ClarkKent_DC said:

He's made that point before -- that Bruce Wayne is stealing from his company whenever he appropriates Wayne Enterprises products for Batman's use.

It could be that Bruce is richer than his father because some even richer relatives died while he was growing up and left him their money.

A couple of stories in the 70s represented him as a significant Galaxy shareholder. One was the Calculator story from Detective Comics #468.

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