Over on the BEAT I wrote the following:

"RM Rhoades said the new Cap Marvel was “a really popular female character among women.”

I can’t claim it’s not true, since I don’t keep close tabs on sales these days. But have the three or four features starring Danvers in her current ID been super-impressive?

And if so, how can one be sure that it’s because of the female fans?'

I got no answer, so I decided to see if anyone here had any information about this subject.

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I think there are well-liked characters who aren't top-sellers. Nightcrawler might fit that description.

One way fans signal their fondness for a character is by dressing up as him or her for conventions. Carol's current costume was introduced when she was named Captain Marvel in 2012.

I think the movie scripts for Iron Man did build upon aspects of Stark's personality from the comics, even as far as I recall most of the "daddy-issue" stuff was new. Even in the Silver Age, Stark was a bit more "driven" than a lot of Marvel heroes, which is something Micheline and Layton exploited in the "Demon in the Bottle" sequence. Allegedly there was some thought of using an alcoholic plotline for Movie #2, but they went with PTSD instead.

Movie-Thor is probably the furthest from his comics-version, but even there, the filmmakers incorporated the "humbling of Thor" motif here and there.

It's not  impossible for movies to use a franchise name and essentially make up starring characters from whole cloth, as witness MEN IN BLACK. I suppose the MCU can do something similar for Carol,. to make a heroine for the 21st century or somesuch.



Richard Willis said:

Like I said in an earlier post, the screenplay, direction and acting will flesh out the character as they did earlier with Tony Stark. I never detected a personality for Tony until the movie.

I think the movie scripts for Iron Man did build upon aspects of Stark's personality from the comics, even as far as I recall most of the "daddy-issue" stuff was new. Even in the Silver Age, Stark was a bit more "driven" than a lot of Marvel heroes, which is something Micheline and Layton exploited in the "Demon in the Bottle" sequence. Allegedly there was some thought of using an alcoholic plotline for Movie #2, but they went with PTSD instead.

Movie-Thor is probably the furthest from his comics-version, but even there, the filmmakers incorporated the "humbling of Thor" motif here and there.

It's not  impossible for movies to use a franchise name and essentially make up starring characters from whole cloth, as witness MEN IN BLACK. I suppose the MCU can do something similar for Carol,. to make a heroine for the 21st century or somesuch.



Richard Willis said:

Like I said in an earlier post, the screenplay, direction and acting will flesh out the character as they did earlier with Tony Stark. I never detected a personality for Tony until the movie.

So has anyone seen fans dressed up like the new Cap at conventions?

Luke Blanchard said:

I think there are well-liked characters who aren't top-sellers. Nightcrawler might fit that description.

One way fans signal their fondness for a character is by dressing up as him or her for conventions. Carol's current costume was introduced when she was named Captain Marvel in 2012.

I guess I should have qualified my statement. I stopped buying comics cold-turkey some time in 1979 (returning in 1989) and wasn't around for the Demon in a Bottle arc. I don't remember any stories involving Howard Stark. I think in the Silver Age it was implied that Tony had built his company from the ground up, presumably by being an inventive genius. As for alcoholism, I think they had Tony smoking, drinking and doing the playboy thing with no real-world effects (even though the playboy couldn't take off his shirt after returning from Vietnam).

Gene Phillips said:

I think the movie scripts for Iron Man did build upon aspects of Stark's personality from the comics, even as far as I recall most of the "daddy-issue" stuff was new. Even in the Silver Age, Stark was a bit more "driven" than a lot of Marvel heroes, which is something Micheline and Layton exploited in the "Demon in the Bottle" sequence. Allegedly there was some thought of using an alcoholic plotline for Movie #2, but they went with PTSD instead.

Movie-Thor is probably the furthest from his comics-version, but even there, the filmmakers incorporated the "humbling of Thor" motif here and there.

It's not  impossible for movies to use a franchise name and essentially make up starring characters from whole cloth, as witness MEN IN BLACK. I suppose the MCU can do something similar for Carol,. to make a heroine for the 21st century or somesuch.



Richard Willis said:

Like I said in an earlier post, the screenplay, direction and acting will flesh out the character as they did earlier with Tony Stark. I never detected a personality for Tony until the movie.

Yes, I've seen them at every HeroesCon since the character was introduced. There's a bit of a home town connection there, since Kelly Sue DeConnick is married to Matt Fraction, who worked at the Heroes Aren't Hard to Find comic shop for a time.

Gene Phillips said:

So has anyone seen fans dressed up like the new Cap at conventions?

Yep, I've seen a few at pretty much every con I've been to since the costume was introduced. 

Gene Phillips said:

So has anyone seen fans dressed up like the new Cap at conventions?

Luke Blanchard said:

I think there are well-liked characters who aren't top-sellers. Nightcrawler might fit that description.

One way fans signal their fondness for a character is by dressing up as him or her for conventions. Carol's current costume was introduced when she was named Captain Marvel in 2012.

Because I have no life, I've been watching a number of cosplay videos on YouTube. It's interesting attempting to spot trends. In particular, while I've seen the occasional "Captain Marvel" I've seen many more "Warbird/Ms. Marvel" costumes.

Some other thoughts:

* Hands down, the most popular DC/Marvel hero for cosploay is Iron Man, which surprises me to some extent. It's an unwieldy costume, and making it look really good has to take a ton of work, but there are plenty of them.

* Next most popular is Spider-Man, particularly female versions of Spider-Man. Lots of Spider-Gwens, MJ as Spider-Man, etc.

* One thing I'm not seeing is much of Superman/Batman, although Wonder Woman and Supergirl are well represented.

*Cosplay does tend to be female-centric, but there are plenty of guys doing it too.

I don't know whether this means anything or not. I would say that with Marvels' current track record, they could make a Street Poet Ray movie and it would do well.

I always thought Carol's Ms. Marvel outfit -- the black one-piece with the red sash and lightning bolt -- was the most striking. Mar-Vell's outfit was somewhat generic and making a female version makes it a copy of a copy, and it's just not very memorable. I absolutely hated the "crest" look where her hair poked out of her helmet like a Mohawk.

I think Iron Man is such a popular cosplay choice because itsi possible to make it look authentic without wearing tights. 

What are you saying, Rob? Are you implying that many fanboys aren't in the best of shape? Is that what you're saying? FAT-SHAMER!

Ha, well, I can't speak for anybody else, but I'm saying that if *I* were to cosplay as Superman, I'd need to add so much padding and sculpting to the costume (not to mention a wig) that I might as well play Iron Man. 

Captain Comics said:

What are you saying, Rob? Are you implying that many fanboys aren't in the best of shape? Is that what you're saying? FAT-SHAMER!

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