I was reading a story reprinted from World's Finest back during the Robin-Olsen pairing, and it made me wonder: just how old was Jimmy supposed to be? He was dating an adult woman, but was also an honorary member of the Legion Of Superheroes, which means he could not have been older than 19 (unless there were different rules for honorary members I'm not aware of, you had to be a teen to join). However, one would assume from his solo adventures that he was in his early 20's.  Presumably he had at least graduated High School. So just how old was he supposed to be?

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Besides the stories Luke mentioned above, you could get your chance to see a Swan/Klein Justice League (and a suggestion of what a JLA adventure by them would have looked like) in:

 

"Superman's Race with the Flash", from Superman # 199 (Aug., 1967)

 

"Clark Kent's Super-Son", from Superman # 197 (Jan., 1967)

This is an imaginary story, predicated on Superman permanently losing both his super-powers and his memory of being Superman, due to a simultaneous exposure to gold and red kryptonite.  A sub-plot of the story is the world mystery over the Man of Steel's disappearance.  And Clark Kent remains ignorant of his former super-life and identity, even though he meets the Justice League, including Batman, and Supergirl.

 

The reason that the story provides for neither one of those heroes getting up with Clark, telling him who he is, and resolving the mystery for the public is one of the biggest cop-outs I have ever encountered in a comic book!

 

 

Yes, it's a shame DC didn't put their best artist on the Justice League of America. Were I in charge I would have swapped Wonder Woman's Ross Andru with Mike Sekowsky (who would go on to draw WW anyway). Andru was experienced drawing a team book with Metal Men.

I've seen most of those Swan-drawn guest starring issues plus Wonder Woman #212 and 214 and this one from Action # 443 (Ja'75). I don't think Curt Swan ever really wanted to draw the Justice Leaguers that much. Sometimes it looked like he was rushing to get through them while focussing on Superman. However had he become their caretaker, I'm sure that he would have adapted nicely to the JLA much like Dick Dillin, though both had a hard time designing aliens!

DC's best artists at the time of the JLA launch... at least, among those in the Schwartz stable... were Carmine Infantino and Gil Kane. Both were busy on other things besides Flash and Green Lantern, but looking back, it seems odd that Schwartz wanted to keep them occupied on things like All-Star Western and Mystery in Space instead of putting one of them on the JLA full-time.

 

But I never had a problem with Sekowsky on JLA. Just wish he could've been inked by Murphy Anderson.

Dave said:

I never had a problem with Sekowsky on JLA. Just wish he could've been inked by Murphy Anderson

Was he ever? The JLA covers were pure Anderson and I don't remember any instance of them working together. Personally I think Bernard Sachs was a great inker for Sekowsky and for me he was what made Sekowski's JLA art look great.

Andy

I, too, loved Mike Sekowsky on JLA.  To me, that is the classic team.  But you're right, Mr. Blanchard, Sekowsky's pencils weren't best served by Bernard Sach's inks.  When Sid Greene came on board as inker, starting with JLA # 46 (Aug., 1966), it noticably elevated Sekowsky's work---to the best of the Fox/Sekwosky era, for me.

 

Your suggestion of Murphy Anderson inking Sekwosky's pencils is a very good one, based on the JLA covers that show that display that combination.  Anderson's detailed lines would have ameliorated many of the criticisms Sekowsky non-fans have of his work.

 

 

Bernard Sach's gave Sekowsky's pencils a pulpish feel especially with his expressions but Sid Greene made it among DC's best. Imagine if Infantino had a stronger inker on Flash or "Bob Kane" on Batman.


Andrew Horn said:

The JLA covers were pure Anderson and I don't remember any instance of them [Sekowsky and Anderson] working together.

 

Murphy Anderson inked Mike Sekowsky's pencils on the covers of all three of the Justice League's Brave and the Bold appearances, as well as the on the covers of JLA # 6-9, 15, 18, 20-3, 25-38, 40-5, 48-50, 53-5.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

If memory serves, one of the JLA ARCHIVE intros mentioned that they constantly got requests from fans to have Murphy Anderson ink the stories, but apparently, he never did more than the covers.

Murphy Anderson inked Mike Sekowsky's pencils on the covers of all three of the Justice League's Brave and the Bold appearances, as well as the on the covers of JLA # 6-9, 15, 18, 20-3, 25-38, 40-5, 48-50, 53-5.

Yes now that you mentioned it I checked and indeed the mix looks great. Still I was quite happy with Sekowsky/Sachs.

Bernard Sach's gave Sekowsky's pencils a pulpish feel especially with his expressions but Sid Greene made it among DC's best. Imagine if Infantino had a stronger inker on Flash or "Bob Kane" on Batman.


Personally I preferred Sid Greene when he did his own art. I loved him on Star Rovers for example. Wish he had gotten more of a chance.

My favorite inker for Infantino was Frank Giacoia. Could have used a lot more of him but instead we got a heck of a lot of Joe Giella who I found very inconsistent. And I hated him on Batman.

Andy

I like Sid Greene's art too.

Re Curt Swan on JLA; I wouldn't have minded seeing at least a sampling of that, but for about the first ten years of the JLA (a Julius Schwartz book) Curt was undoubtedly Mort Weisinger's primary artist (I can't recall him do any work for another editor in that time, except Jack Schiff occasionally earlier on), and I couldn't imagine Mort allowing another editor to use his number one artist (unless he was overruled by Jack Liebowitz or Irwin Donenfeld), particularly on a comic published eight or nine months a year.

 

By the 1970s, I would propose that Dick Dillin was so well established on the JLA, that I doubt Swan (who was now in the Schwartz and Murray Boltinoff stables) would even have been considered for the post.

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