I wanted to post a few thoughts on this one-shot book without sprinkling too many spoilers in other threads.  I don't think I'll have the energy to track this "event" the way I did with Secret Empire though. In any case:

Marvel Legacy #1

I can't really fault Marvel for wanting to do this. They are in a bit of a slump and it seems like a no-brainer to try and recapture some of what the older readers say they want.  At the same time it seems to me that what readers say they want or think they want doesn't always equate with what they are actually willing to buy or read. 

Most of the art here looks great and Jason Aaron does his usual solid job with the writing.  However, this reads a little bit like a hybrid of DC's Rebirth and Metal books. We start off by learning that there is a secret history of the Marvel U involving caveman era super heroes and celestials. How can this be? Anyone who follows Marvel continuity knows it's not possible. Stay tuned..

The rest of the issue mostly sets up scenarios by which various dead heroes are returning. They are, of course, the iconic older heroes that Marvel has largely been ignoring.  And we see what appears to be a new direction for Wakanda and a hint at a Fantastic Four reunion.  Again, how is this possible? What's the mechanism?

In a way, this story is a sort of sequel to the Secret Wars series. The continuity that was created by Reed Richards at the end of Secret Wars appears to have been manipulated once again. This time by Valeria Richards.  Why does she need prehistoric super heroes, Celestials and Infinity Stones to be a part of this? Not clear yet. Apparently she wants everything to be "ridiculous" and "magical."   It all sounds a bit too derivative of the stuff we saw in the Rebirth comic if you ask me.

I'm not sure what I'll actually buy yet. I'll probably mostly just stick with the stuff I already follow. But something like a new Marvel Two-In-One comic does ring the nostalgia bell a little bit.

What about tie-ins you ask?

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Thanks, Philip.

I was thinking of fire-winged Angel and the original, who I assume is still around somewhere, but made of metal and an amnesiac or something. Neither of those upgrades appeal to me, and neither says "Angel" very much.

So, examining Angel we've always kicked around here that he has to have hollow bones and a ridiculously huge wingspan to actually fly using wings. He's been preposterous from the start.

So what if his actual super-power is -- wait for it -- anti-gravity? What if the wings are just for steering and such? Yes, it's very Hawkman-like except Angel would be clearly projecting the power in order to fly -- so what if could project it past his own person? What if he could project anti-gravity?

He'd be a combination of Light Lass and Hawkman, which is pretty formidable, and could retain his original look. He'd still look like an Angel, but be more than just a target.

ClarkKent_DC said:

There NEEDS to be changes made at the top if they make blunders like that!

Didn't they just do that? http://captaincomics.ning.com/forum/topics/axel-alonso-out-as-marve...

I find it perplexing that giving the Falcon real wings is seen as a positive thing but the Angel is seen as lame and useless. Is it because his personality wasn't developed enough?

  Angel was created at a time when the power of flight itself was impressive.  Super powerful then would be fairly run of the mill now.  

Richard Willis said:

ClarkKent_DC said:

There NEEDS to be changes made at the top if they make blunders like that!

Didn't they just do that? http://captaincomics.ning.com/forum/topics/axel-alonso-out-as-marve...

I find it perplexing that giving the Falcon real wings is seen as a positive thing but the Angel is seen as lame and useless. Is it because his personality wasn't developed enough?

I see both Falcon and Angel needing an upgrade. Real wings aren't advantage enough in superhero battles, so they need to be supplemented somehow. Artificial wings are worse, because they require a team of engineers with unlimited resources to keep you in the air, where -- like Angel -- your chief purpose seems to be "target."

Doc Strange's Legacy numbering:

I've read a bunch more Legacy books, but I've already read most of the ones I had pre-existing interest in. So now I'm reading a lot of books out of a sense of duty more than any real enthusiasm. That may color some of my remarks, so take that into account. Also, these are reviews (ish), so assume an IMHO attached invisibly to every sentence.

* Spider-Gwen #25-26: I assumed after the Spider-people team-up business a few years ago (that I didn't read) that Spider-Gwen would be on our Earth now. I assumed wrong. After a few pages I realized we were on a parallel Earth, and I started to feel my interest wane -- Gwen couldn't interact with any familiar characters, so I had to learn everything from scratch.

Worse, Gwen has been Venomized in these two issues. There is no Marvel character I despise more than Venom, so reading these issues was drudgery.

I found the art ugly and unpleasant. It was simplistic, almost amateurish, with very few shadows and very little rendering. There was no understanding of anatomy at all, with exaggerated this and elongated that for no artistic purpose I could see.

I had some mild interest in seeing the fates of other characters in this parallel world. Matt Murdock is the Kingpin, for example. Peter Parker was The Lizard and died, becoming (metaphorically) Spider-Gwen's Uncle Ben. The Murdock thing is ironic, but there's no "Kingpin" lurking in our Murdock, so it's one of those things the Commander calls a "neat idea" that just seems pointless after the initial surprise.

* America #8-9: Here's another book, like Iceman, aimed at younger, more gay-enthusiastic readers than me. Unlike Iceman, though, I think this is actually a pretty good book that I might enjoy if I was 40 years younger.

America is super-feminist, and it's super gay. Most of the female characters are lesbian, or should be presumed lesbian until proven otherwise, with even the villainess Exterminatrix commenting that capturing America turned her on.

The book doesn't just have gay characters; it's set in a world where LGBTQ seems to be the default setting. It's very Millennial in aspect and dialogue. The downside of this is that some comments and slang go right over my head, because I'm not current on today's slang, especially gay references.

But there's a sense of fun and playfulness to America  (unlike Iceman's dull earnestness) which I find appealing. America attends (Supreme Court Judge Sonia) Sotomayer University, and lives in the (astrophysicist Neil) DeGrasse Tyson dorms. Her favorite professor works in the Department of Radical Women and Intergalactic Indigenous People. All of those references I got, and they made me chuckle.

America's adventures are a bit on the outlandish side, which everyone takes in stride as just another day at the beach. As I say, it seems to be all in fun, which is endearing.

But it is a book aimed firmly at Millennials. This is a book where I'll always be an outsider. I imagine it's how my Dad, a WWII vet, felt watching movies in the '70s. It just wasn't his world any more, and that's how I feel reading America.

Which I applaud. As I've always said, I want there to be a lot of books aimed at people other than me, because that means a healthy market. This book, which currently has awful sales, might succeed if there was a huge push to reach Millennials. Alas, the majority of them will likely be unaware of America until its inevitable cancellation.

Despicable Deadpool #287-289: It took me a long time to "get" Deadpool, but now I do. This is straight Deadpool nonsense, accentuated by the presence of the no-nonsense Cable, so it's fun. Not crazy about the art, but it's serviceable.

Spirits of Vengeance #1-2: I know we've covered this, but it's still inexplicable to me why these books aren't Spirits of Vengeance #24-25. The previous book even featured Johnny Blaze, as this one does.

In addition to Blaze (who is again the Ghost Rider, as he wasn't in the first SoV run) is joined by Blade, Satana and Daimon Hellstrom in a rather organic way as something big and evil this way comes. I find the incidental characters more imaginative than usual, and the big bad has some biblical basis (Judas' 30 pieces of silver).

I don't care for the art*, but otherwise this was enjoyable.

* As Jim Lee seems to be the default style at DC, there's a default style at Marvel, too -- only I don't like it. I think it may be a manga influence, but a poorly understood one -- the art is angular and ugly, which manga can sometimes be, but they miss the underlying charm. That's just a guess on my part, but I hope it's a passing fad.

* Hawkeye #12: This isn't a Legacy book, but my LCS pulled it by accident. It continues Matt Fraction's lighter touch, which is appreciated. It also has cartoonish, unattractive art, which is not.

Has this book been starring Kate What's-Her-Name for the last 11 issues? Just curious. Anyway, this issue features a team-up with X-23, and the two ladies beat up some bad guys. Clint Barton does show up at the end, which I assume will lead to an ongoing team-up, which is what I assume the first Legacy issue will establish.

I assume a lot of things, don't I?

Darkhawk #51: This one-shot essentially buries all the changes to the main character since his book was canceled, allowing him to be Darkhawk again free and clear without all of that nonsense. That's a good thing. Next time he appears, you don't have to worry about anything except what you learned in Darkhawk #1-51.

U.S. Avengers #11-12: I don't know who most of these characters are, but it doesn't matter, because it's evident that this book is ending, to be subsumed by the main Avengers book in January.

It's a cute story where a bunch of Skrulls have set up a world to mirror one of our entertainments, like in the old Lee/Kirby Fantastic Four. But instead of 1930s Chicago gangsters, this world is set up to mirror 1940s Archie Comics.

Archie Ritchie Redwood is actually a power-mad control freak, and the other Riverdale Glenwood residents live in fear of being replaced. ("You're not as much of a core character as you think!"). Ritchie enforces his will with two Super Skrulls, who play the Mr. Weatherbee and Big Moose archetypes. The Jughead character ("Bugface") wants to bring it all crashing down. Like I said, cute.

So the book is over. So I guess it doesn't matter that I don't know why Sunspot is calling himself Citizen V now, or what the heck Squirrel Girl is doing here. (Which is not much.) Or why Red Hulk isn't Thunderbolt Ross any more. I don't even know how long Cannonball has been married to Ultra Boy Smasher, or where or how that happened. I guess I'll never know anything more about Enigma, the final member of the team, about whom I know precisely nothing.

C'est la vie.

X-Men Gold #16: The big crossover with X-Men Blue is over, so now I get a taste of what this book will be like when it's standing on its own.

It's all right. Old Man Logan is exactly like regular Logan in story niche, fighting style, dialogue. I should be disappointed, but really, he's here to fill that niche so it's OK that he's not a unique character. It's nice to see Nightcrawler, Storm (without the mohawk), Colossus and Kitty working together again. I still don't care for Rachel, but I guess she fills the Jean Grey niche without all the baggage.

LIke I said, OK.

X-Men Blue #16: Like the book above, this is the first Legacy issue that stands alone. And it looks like it's trying to commit hari-kiri.

That is to say, time is collapsing and the time-displaced X-Men need to go back to where they came from. Of course, they've changed and learned a lot and aren't the same kids, so even if they go back, they've still changed time. And there's the problem of seeing themselves still in the past when they apparently went back via magic (??!?) in some previous issue. Of course, they might create an entirely different timeline if they go back.

Wait, my brain is beginning to hurt. Must stop thinking about it.

Also, it looks like Professor X really is coming back. I don't think it's a callback, but this time it's Magneto who knew Xavier was alive all along, instead of when Chuck faked his death in the 1960s and Jean Grey knew that Xavier was alive all along (The X-Men #42-65).

I hear the groans about Xavier coming back from the dead, when we actually saw his dead brain. But honestly, if they bring back the 1980s X-Men you will hear no complaint from me, no matter how implausible or artificial the means. Marvel has mysteriously and methodically chipped away at everything that made X-Men good and great for me, until all that's left is a bunch of C-listers that I don't care about. Jean Grey is also on the way back, so I'm crossing fingers for Cyclops. And, hey, what about Banshee? I don't know what happened to Siryn, but she's not around, so that green-and-yellow suit is unoccupied.

Anyway, if the time-displaced X-Men do go back, does that end the book? Or do we follow their adventures in the past? Or does another crapload of X-people take their place? Maybe the upcoming X-Men Red isn't just a new book, but a replacement for X-Men Blue. I guess we wait and see.

The art, as usual, is unattractive.

Royals #9-11: Characters I don't much care about, with more ugly art. I suspect this title ends with #12 -- in fact, I may have read that somewhere -- which is a mercy killing.

The regular Inhumans crew is here, with the exception of Black Bolt and Triton. That's actually good thinking, because Black Bolt is so powerful he makes the others superfluous, and we all know from Silver Age Justice League of America and Teen Titans how hard it is for writers to use a water-based character on land (or, in this case, outer space), so let's breathe a sigh of relief that the story isn't artificially angled to give Triton something to do.

What remains of the Royal Family is four characters who just aren't very interesting.

Medusa's hair has been cut off, and she's got some mysterious illness, so she's even less useful than usual. Crystal is reallllly powerful, but writers (including this one) always downplay her that so she doesn't overshadow the rest, which always bugs me. Gorgon is, thankfully, out of the wheelchair so he can (and does) do some bruising. 

And then there's Maximuis. Maximus? Why the heck is he there? Have the others forgotten how many times he's tried to kill them? Has Medusa forgotten that he mind-controlled her into performing fellatio on him? I can see not executing him, as he is of royal blood and there's probably a thousand legal and tradition-based barriers to doing so, but why bring him with you? He's a betrayal waiting to happen.

I just realized: Karnak isn't here, either. Well, you've got Gorgon, who can handle the hand-to-hand combat, so Karnak's absence isn't noticeable. (Obviously, as evidenced by the fact that I didn't notice it.)

There are some new kids, and thank God for one of them: Marvel Boy. He's always been an interesting character to me, due to his comfort level with esoteric tech and strange abilities, which are cockroach-based. (Seriously! For real!) His blase exoticness is always a hoot.

But there are also two new Inhumans from the recent revival, which like all of the new characters, are painfully uninteresting but shoved at us anyway. That would be Swain and Flint. They cannot die painfully soon enough, but I fear their creators are still around and will continue to force them into starring roles for which they are entirely unsuited. I will continue to shake my fists at an uncaring sky every time they appear.

Anyway, the Inhumans are in space looking for the super-Terrigen that created the Kree. Old Man Marvel Boy and Old Man Maximus are doing something similar in the far future in a blasted world whose origin I am not interested enough in to figure out.

Please cancel this title.

Jessica Jones #13-14: It's Jessica & Friends vs. the Purple Man. I feel like I've been transported back in time 15 years, and I don't mind a bit. This is a good, paranoid, in-your-head stuff.

And thank God for Michael Gaydos, who used to be one of Marvel's lesser artists, but is now one of their best. Because he can actually draw things that look like things.

Captain Marvel #126. Marvel Legacy is just a label on this one. It's Captain Marvel fighting big, space things. Except this story takes place in an alternate universe. I have to confess, I'm getting a little tired of parallel worlds. When Carol meets Star-Lord, I want it to be Star-Lord, not "Star-King" or whatever.

Moon Girl #25. I feel a little cheated that Devil Dinosaur isn't in this book any more. I mean, I assume it's temporary, but I'm probably never going to read another issue so it would be nice to "meet" him in his current configuration. Next life, maybe.

As to this issue, I confess to kinda skimming it, because the art was so awful. It guest stars the Human Torch and Thing, and I guess it's because someone out there is stealing things and pretending to be Mr. Fantastic and Invisible Woman. (Probably Super-Skrull. But what do I know?) Anyway, Silver Surfer and Galactus show up at the end, I presume to talk and not eat the planet.

I guess that's sorta interesting.

Silver Sable #36: A nice done-in-one as Sable defeats some terrorists, at least one of whom idolizes her. This issue was quite entertaining, and I used to dislike Silver Sable.

Thanos #13. Thanos kills a lot of aliens until a super-future Ghost Rider shows up to invite him to meet his future self, who looks a lot like the Maestro, only purple. We'll have to wait for next issue for something to actually happen.

The art is more old-school Marvel (before the manga influence) and it is much appreciated.

Falcon #1-2: Sam and his new protege are dealing with riots in Philadelphia. I get the impression they are artificially prompted by the bad guy, who is secretly the mayor of Philadelphia. Didn't grab me.

Black Panther #167: I commented on the last issue, but it had no Panther in it, so I'm glad to report he's front and center in this one. And it's interesting on a number of levels, with some excellent art.

Something is going awry among the gods of Wakanda, and we get a brief history lesson about them. Is it new that the Panther god is actually Bast of ancient Egypt? That was a surprise to me, but maybe not to anyone else. It makes sense, so I don't mind. Gods go by many faces. Heck, "Bast" might not be her "real" one.

Then there's some psychological hoo-ha with the black guy from the Wrecking Crew. I get the impression he's been in this book a few times before. Anyway, it delves into what makes a villain and why he behaves the way he does. It doesn't really look fixable. Interesting stuff.

Invincible Iron Man #594: We didn't get any Tony Stark last issue, and we don't get any this issue either. (Unless he's really the guy in the '60s armor in a fetal position in some unknown location.) Anyway, I learn a little bit more about one of Stark's Moms, who is apparently a former Baby Boomer rock star, although I don't know who she''s modeled on, if anyone (Grace Slick? Carole King? Judy Collins? Carly Simon? Aretha Franklin? Joni Mitchell? Tina Turner? Linda Ronstadt? Donna Summer? Stevie Nicks? All of them?). So, she's more interesting this issue, especially when she hits someone with Keith Moon's guitar. (Keith Moon had a guitar? He was a drummer!)

The biggest part of the issue is Infamous Iron Man getting his butt handed to him by a collection of C-list villains like Chemistro. I dunno what their beef is. Doom is forced to flee, to their delight. So, he gets weaker as a hero? C'mon -- the evil Dr. Doom would have beaten this guys in 20 seconds.

Anyway, there's some interesting stuff going on here.

Cable #150-151: Cable assembles a team to find out who killed Candra, an External who presumably can't be killed. I didn't read closely enough to find out why he cares so much. Or maybe I did, and they just didn't tell me.

Anyway, he assembles a team of '90s rejects (Shatterstar, Longshot, Doop) and X-23, just to keep it from being a League of Liefeld Losers. That latter aspect had me turning pages pretty fast, because any time I see Longshot or Shatterstar, I want to get to the end as soon as I can. And I don't want to see Doop at all.

This is actually better than the comics these guys used to hang out in, because today's writers and artists are better. So there's that.

Old Man Logan #31: Logan gets caught up in a war between Clan Yoshida and The Hand in Japan. It reads just like a regular Wolverine book, except that OML has occasional thought balloons about how it takes him longer to heal. That doesn't appear to be an impediment of any kind.

I like it fine.

Moon Knight #189: Last issue didn't have any Moon Knight in it, so I was glad to see him here. And I take back what I said last time about how I thought his multiple-personality disorder was interesting in theory but boring in practice. Because this issue (or maybe a previous one) has dealt with the weakest link: Jake Lockley. Previously he had just been a blue-collar cabbie, a cliche I found boring. But now it's established that Lockley is the most dangerous personality, a homicidal psychopath that the other two personlities try to keep under control. That's kinda cool. Did Warren Ellis do that?

On the superhero front, MK has to deal with a supervillain powered by the Egyptian sun god, Ra. He's really quite outmatched, and there are some psychological aspects, too.

It's a low bar, but this is the most interesting Moon Knight series I've ever read.

Secret Warriors #9: I like Illyana Rasputin, and she's in this. Ms. Marvel is a standout. Karnak is here, in ultra-weird-philosophy mode, which is how I like him. Moon Girl is vaguely interesting.

However, Quake -- unlike her TV counterpart -- is a pretty bland character. And then there's Inferno, one of the new Inhumans, who by definition suck all the life out of every story they are in.

They rescue some kids, Mr. Sinister is somehow involved, and I find all of this so boring I will never read another issue of this title.



Captain Comics said:


* Hawkeye #12: This isn't a Legacy book, but my LCS pulled it by accident. It continues Matt Fraction's lighter touch, which is appreciated. It also has cartoonish, unattractive art, which is not.

Has this book been starring Kate What's-Her-Name for the last 11 issues? Just curious. Anyway, this issue features a team-up with X-23, and the two ladies beat up some bad guys. Clint Barton does show up at the end, which I assume will lead to an ongoing team-up, which is what I assume the first Legacy issue will establish.

I assume a lot of things, don't I?

Hawkeye has only starred Kate Bishop in it's current incarnation.

U.S. Avengers #11-12: I don't know who most of these characters are, but it doesn't matter, because it's evident that this book is ending, to be subsumed by the main Avengers book in January.

It's a cute story where a bunch of Skrulls have set up a world to mirror one of our entertainments, like in the old Lee/Kirby Fantastic Four. But instead of 1930s Chicago gangsters, this world is set up to mirror 1940s Archie Comics.

Archie Ritchie Redwood is actually a power-mad control freak, and the other Riverdale Glenwood residents live in fear of being replaced. ("You're not as much of a core character as you think!"). Ritchie enforces his will with two Super Skrulls, who play the Mr. Weatherbee and Big Moose archetypes. The Jughead character ("Bugface") wants to bring it all crashing down. Like I said, cute.

So the book is over. So I guess it doesn't matter that I don't know why Sunspot is calling himself Citizen V now, or what the heck Squirrel Girl is doing here. (Which is not much.) Or why Red Hulk isn't Thunderbolt Ross any more. I don't even know how long Cannonball has been married to Ultra Boy Smasher, or where or how that happened. I guess I'll never know anything more about Enigma, the final member of the team, about whom I know precisely nothing.

C'est la vie.

I'll be missing this one. It's been a fun title, even throughout Secret Empire.

X-Men Gold #16: The big crossover with X-Men Blue is over, so now I get a taste of what this book will be like when it's standing on its own.

It's all right. Old Man Logan is exactly like regular Logan in story niche, fighting style, dialogue. I should be disappointed, but really, he's here to fill that niche so it's OK that he's not a unique character. It's nice to see Nightcrawler, Storm (without the mohawk), Colossus and Kitty working together again. I still don't care for Rachel, but I guess she fills the Jean Grey niche without all the baggage.

LIke I said, OK.

It's like comfort food. It's not great, but you like the characters and enjoy reading about them.

X-Men Blue #16: Like the book above, this is the first Legacy issue that stands alone. And it looks like it's trying to commit hari-kiri.

That is to say, time is collapsing and the time-displaced X-Men need to go back to where they came from. Of course, they've changed and learned a lot and aren't the same kids, so even if they go back, they've still changed time. And there's the problem of seeing themselves still in the past when they apparently went back via magic (??!?) in some previous issue. Of course, they might create an entirely different timeline if they go back.

Wait, my brain is beginning to hurt. Must stop thinking about it.

Also, it looks like Professor X really is coming back. I don't think it's a callback, but this time it's Magneto who knew Xavier was alive all along, instead of when Chuck faked his death in the 1960s and Jean Grey knew that Xavier was alive all along (The X-Men #42-65).

I hear the groans about Xavier coming back from the dead, when we actually saw his dead brain. But honestly, if they bring back the 1980s X-Men you will hear no complaint from me, no matter how implausible or artificial the means. Marvel has mysteriously and methodically chipped away at everything that made X-Men good and great for me, until all that's left is a bunch of C-listers that I don't care about. Jean Grey is also on the way back, so I'm crossing fingers for Cyclops. And, hey, what about Banshee? I don't know what happened to Siryn, but she's not around, so that green-and-yellow suit is unoccupied.

Anyway, if the time-displaced X-Men do go back, does that end the book? Or do we follow their adventures in the past? Or does another crapload of X-people take their place? Maybe the upcoming X-Men Red isn't just a new book, but a replacement for X-Men Blue. I guess we wait and see.

The art, as usual, is unattractive.

Xavier coming back was inevitable. Might as well just roll with it.


Falcon #1-2: Same and his new protege are dealing with riots in Philadelphia. I get the impression they are artificially prompted by the bad guy, who is secretly the mayor of Philadelphia. Didn't grab me.

The problem with Sam is that he just has never felt like a main character. he was introduced as Captain America's partner, and outside of that role he's just not a very interesting individual. he doesn't seem to have any hobbies or interests, nor any character quirks. He's essentially the Black Captain America except with even less personality.

Years ago, Christopher Priest introduced a charter named Josiah X who was a descendant of one of the experimental Super Soldiers from World War II. He was a black Muslim and extremely conflicted about his role in the world, and that made him a much more interesting character. I love Sam, and I always will--I feel he's an extremely important character in the history of comics--but much like the Angel, you can tell there's something inherently wrong with the character because they keep trying to fix him.


Secret Warriors #9: I like Illyana Rasputin, and she's in this. Ms. Marvel is a standout. Karnak is here, in ultra-weird-philosophy mode, which is how I like him. Moon Girl is vaguely interesting.

However, Quake -- unlike her TV counterpart -- is a pretty bland character. And then there's Inferno, one of the new Inhumans, who by definition suck all the life out of every story they are in.

They rescue some kids, Mr. Sinister is somehow involved, and I find all of this so boring I will never read another issue of this title.

Funny, I thought this was the only good thing to come out of Secret Empire. However, I can also see your complaints, particularly about Quake and Inferno, as neither one really seems to bring that much tot he team other than their powers. The other characters interact really well in my opinion, and that's what makes the comic work.

Of course, the other problem is that the team no longer has a reason to exist now that Secret Empire is over. That's not so easily solved, and just throwing random threats at them isn't a good idea.

As I said before, the final stories of Secret Empire emphasized that Sam Wilson was worthy to be Captain America as they took that title away from him and he became the Falcon again. I don't like his new suit. The colors are too dark and too generic. And he seems so willing to step aside for Steve that it eliminates all his character growth. It's like he's relieved not to be Cap (or a Cap since there are many double characters around---AGAIN!) anymore!

Clint Barton was the star of Occupy Avengers along with the revamped Red Wolf who is a great character. That book vanished before the other now redundant Avengers books!

I've been enjoying the Spider-Gwen book in spite of the art. I haven't been wild about the Gwenom story either, but I like the character enough to put up with it. I like Matt Murdock better as a heel in this book than I ever did as a hero.



The Baron said:

I've been enjoying the Spider-Gwen book in spite of the art. I haven't been wild about the Gwenom story either, but I like the character enough to put up with it. I like Matt Murdock better as a heel in this book than I ever did as a hero.

Villains are generally more interesting than heroes, so you're not wrong there. My complaint is that I don't see any Kingpin tendencies in original recipe Matt Murdock that would make you slap your forehead at Kingpin Murdock and say, "Of course! If not for that accident, this is what he'd naturally become!" It would make more sense if the character was J. Jonah Jameson or Frederick Foswell, both of whom have authoritative tendencies. Murdock's main personality trait is Catholic guilt.

I thought about you as I was reading Spider-Gwen, Baron, because I knew you bought it from your posts. (And you don't buy a lot.) I'll give it another shot when Venom is out of the picture, or buy an old trade. I like the idea that she's in a band called The Mary Janes -- both of my nephews have been in bands so it seems current to me. Is there a Mary Jane Watson in this world?

Yeah, the Mary Janes are Mary Jane Watson, Glory Grant, Betty Brant and Gwen Stacy.

Betty-65  isn't much like the original, she's a spooky-weird, vaguely Asian looking chick. 

But then, having recently started re-reading the original Gwen's earliest appearances, Spider-Gwen isn't all that much like her, either.

MJ is still pretty much MJ, and I don't remember enough about Glory Grant to say about her.

Glory Grant was a tall, black ex-model. That was about the extent of her characterization.

Is there a Spider-Gwen trade you'd recommend?

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