When Marvel hit it big in the early 60s, DC had to have noticed. It also had to address their existence. In Adventure Comics #350, Chameleon Boy morphs into a spider then winks at the reader and comments on Spider-Man (not named). Brave & Bold #74 (N'67) had Batman riff on Petey as well and the infamous B&B #68 (N'66) had the Bat-Hulk!

Justice League of America #75 (N'69) had supposedly Avengers-like foes though I never got that until fairly recently. #87 had the Heroes of Angor (Wandjina, Jack B. Quick, Silver Sorceress and Bluejay) who were counterparts of Thor, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch and Yellowjacket. There were also the Marvel parodies with the Inferior 5.

Were they effective? Necessary? Cringe-worthy? And did I miss any?

Comments?

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I'm not so sure Plas was that much of an inspiration of Reed's. Stan Lee was adamant that Reed not be silly. He never did any of Plas' transformations nor did he rarely stretch his neck out like the already established Elastic Lad or Elongated Man. He seldom bounced, coiled, ricocheted or morphed. Actually, for a genius, Reed was very unimaginative with his powers.

And the Thing was no Woozy Winks, either! 

Dave Blanchard said:

The Silver Age Plastic Man's archfoe was Doctor Dome, which you might say reflects DC returning the favor as Mr. Fantastic is clearly inspired by Plastic Man (a character DC had acquired from Quality in the 1950s, but had done nothing with until 1966).

Very many Silver Age characters drew elements Golden Age characters in some way. For example, Dr. Strange's ability to release his spirit body was anticipated by Mr. Mystic in the Spirit sections. I've read an interview with Gil Kane in which he acknowledged that the Silver Age Atom was really a revamped Doll Man. One manifestation of this is the similarity of their fighting styles. Ant-Man, in contrast, didn't fight that way at all.

 

In Reed's case, I would suppose Plastic Man was no longer being published, and Lee saw the character concept as up for grabs. Apparently Mort Weisinger and Julie Schwartz saw things the same way, so Weisinger had Jimmy turn into Elastic Lad in a series of stories, and Schwartz introduced Elongated Man.

Not that long ago -- in Superman #701, in fact, the kickoff story for Superman's walk across America -- Peter Parker showed up! 

 

Peter Parker also was in a crowd scene in an issue of Crisis On Infinite Earths.

"There were several direct parodies of Stan Lee from DC.  I think we're all aware of Funky Flashman, but there was also Stan Bragg, Sam Simeon's editor from Angel and the Ape."

 

Check out Sgt. Brian Muldoon, introduced in Capt. America No. 139 (July 1971). Just my imagination, or is this guy a dead ringer for Jack Kirby? Considering that Muldoon was introduced after Kirby's abrupt departure from Marvel, in a story written by Stan Lee, and Muldoon was NOT a flattering portrayal ... Funky Flashman may have been Kirby's revenge on Stan.

Thor, Captain America, Spider-Man, and even Valiant's X-O Manowar are in the gulag battle of Kingdom Come #4.
Was Charles McNider ever referenced in a DAREDEVIL comic book?
Dave Blanchard said:
Was Charles McNider ever referenced in a DAREDEVIL comic book?


In a story proper, I couldn't tell you.  My '60's run of Daredevil is spotty, at best.

 

However, in the letter column, I think---and I stress think---that a fan once wrote in to challenge Stan Lee's claim that Daredevil was the first blind super-hero by mentioning Doctor Mid-Nite.  Stan's response was to point out, not unreasonably, that Dr. Mid-Nite was only blind on a technicality---that he could see at night, and  he could see during the day with the aid of infra-red lenses---so he wasn't truly blind.

 

I remember that exchange with a fair amount of certainty; it's whether it appeared in a DD lettercol or not that I'm not sure about.

Of course, Daredevil himself was only blind on a technicality, since his Silver Age origin made it clear that he had gained heightened capabilities of his other senses due to that nasty whack on the head from nuclear materials. Frank Miller later tried to downplay the atomic angle and shifted it over to ninja-heightened capabilities. Still a whole lotta "sight" for a guy who was supposed to be blind.

No, Daredevil isn't blind on a technicality; he's blind. For all his enhanced senses, he can't read a newspaper or watch TV or watch a movie the way you or I can. Remember the scene where Ben Urich confronted him and simply held up a photograph and said, "Describe this picture and I'll drop the whole thing"?

 

And the notion that your other senses develop enough to compensate for the loss of sight is a myth, anyway. No wonder Frank Miller downplayed it.

In All-Star Comics #59 (Ap'76), Doctor Mid-Nite is able to tell if someone's lying from their infra-red pattern. He also was able to detect heat signatures as he did in #61. But he was referred to as being blind several times. His Infra-red lenses were probably emphasized to distinguish him from Daredevil. And Doc never had heightened senses, though he did star in a "Whatever Happened To..." in DC Comics Presents where his nighttime vision was fading and he needed an upgrade to his lenses to continue to function.

Matt Murdock is blind the same way Tony Stark has a heart condition -- only when some angst is needed to move the plot along. Matt might not be able to read a newspaper held in front of him, but he'd be able to tell you that you're holding up a newspaper, thanks to his ability to detect the shape and location of objects around him. He could also tell you whether it was the New York Times or the New York Post, due to the different dimensions of the papers. No non-super-powered, non-heightened-other-senses person could do that. He also had the rare superpower, shared only by Superman, of convincing people that he was a different person merely by wearing glasses (cf., Mike Murdock).

Dave Blanchard said:

Matt might not be able to read a newspaper held in front of him, but he'd be able to tell you that you're holding up a newspaper, thanks to his ability to detect the shape and location of objects around him. He could also tell you whether it was the New York Times or the New York Post, due to the different dimensions of the papers. No non-super-powered, non-heightened-other-senses person could do that.


Heck, I can do that! (But then, I've been an ink-stained wretch for too many years to count ...)

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