When Marvel hit it big in the early 60s, DC had to have noticed. It also had to address their existence. In Adventure Comics #350, Chameleon Boy morphs into a spider then winks at the reader and comments on Spider-Man (not named). Brave & Bold #74 (N'67) had Batman riff on Petey as well and the infamous B&B #68 (N'66) had the Bat-Hulk!

Justice League of America #75 (N'69) had supposedly Avengers-like foes though I never got that until fairly recently. #87 had the Heroes of Angor (Wandjina, Jack B. Quick, Silver Sorceress and Bluejay) who were counterparts of Thor, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch and Yellowjacket. There were also the Marvel parodies with the Inferior 5.

Were they effective? Necessary? Cringe-worthy? And did I miss any?

Comments?

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Dave Blanchard said:

[Daredevil] also had the rare superpower, shared only by Superman, of convincing people that he was a different person merely by wearing glasses (cf., Mike Murdock).


And by Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.


Commander Benson said:
Dave Blanchard said:

[Daredevil] also had the rare superpower, shared only by Superman, of convincing people that he was a different person merely by wearing glasses (cf., Mike Murdock).


And by Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.

Hey! I'll have you know that eyeglasses make for an excellent disguise! Even for a dog!


Commander Benson said:
 Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.
Good point -- I forgot about her. But then again, as much as I've ragged on and on (and on) about how lousy Prince Ra-Man was during DC's Silver Age, for sheer mind-numbing, wire-to-wire crumminess, probably nothing beats the sustained smackdown Bob Kanigher inflicted on Silver Age kids via his WONDER WOMAN stories. Thanks to DC's SHOWCASE PRESENTS series, I've had the opportunity to read thousands upon thousands of pages of prime 1960s comics that previously eluded me. None of those pages, however, have been WONDER WOMAN pages. And none are likely to any time soon.

...What the Commander said , regarding the Calls/FF/Sea Devils' , etc. , similarilty to the type of character line-up that , for instance , many younger audience-oriented movies of the late 50s/early 80s had .

  I was reminded by this of another one of these " $1 bodega " comics that I mentioned in the "...Read Today ? " line , I read an issue of...Was it Nightstalkers ? ( One word . ) A supernatural team , including Hannibal King , except I think that they were fighting him that issue...Well , it included a 1-page filler " commenting " upon the then-recent " Daeth Of Superman " , with both Clark Kent and Kal-El's name nearly - but not quite fully - visible on a gravestone .

  Several years ago that Marvel Knights Spider-Man title from Marvel had a story arc by one of the Hudlin Brothers involving an " almost/parodied/obvious " Superman reference , as well .

Command Benson wrote: >> Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.

 

Good point -- I forgot about her. But then again, as much as I've ragged on and on (and on) about how lousy Prince Ra-Man was during DC's Silver Age, for sheer mind-numbing, wire-to-wire crumminess, probably nothing beats the sustained smackdown Bob Kanigher inflicted on Silver Age kids via his WONDER WOMAN stories. Thanks to DC's SHOWCASE PRESENTS series, I've had the opportunity to read thousands upon thousands of pages of prime 1960s comics that previously eluded me. None of those pages, however, have been WONDER WOMAN pages. And none are likely to any time soon.

 

Dave, here's a tip: If you want to use the quote function and then add your comments, first click on the "HTML" button on the row of buttons above the box where you type your response. That will reveal the hidden HTML coding

 

Then, place your cursor at the far bottom right of the box, OUTSIDE all the coding. If you don't do that and let the coding remain hidden, the cursor will fall INSIDE the coding and your comments will be included in the quote.

 

You can click on the button again to hide the coding if you want.

 

It appears that the coding is arranged on the assumption that people would write their comments above the quote, but nobody here seems to do it that way. I certainly don't; it seems more logical to have the quote come before my response to the quote.

Thanks for the tips, CK. My main problem, though, was that I tried to edit my mistakes last night, but none of the corrections would "take" so I ended up with two posts saying pretty much the same thing, though both were kind of messed up. Maybe we can blame it on the weather, which is even more messed up?

I ended up with two posts saying pretty much the same thing, though both were kind of messed up.

Dave, Dave Dave. If you keep giving me those kinds of straight lines, I'm going to have to respond. I know we're new here, but it's still the Mr. Silver Age Forum, so try not to lob these softballs into my wheelhouse.

No doubt about it, WW is one messed up SA title. I occasionally give it a Mopee Award, as I do with Jimbo and Lo. But, honestly, I could give them a half-dozen a year and not run out any time soon. I think quirky and charming crossed the line into wacko quite a few times for WW.

BTW, Matt could read newspapers in the SA, using his super-sensitive fingertips to detect the ink imprints. I'm not sure if that was radioactivity-based or because his other senses compensated for his blindness. Either way, it was kind of far-fetched--but it wouldn't apply to photos, I don't think.

-- MSA

Mr. Silver Age said:

BTW, Matt could read newspapers in the SA, using his super-sensitive fingertips to detect the ink imprints. I'm not sure if that was radioactivity-based or because his other senses compensated for his blindness. Either way, it was kind of far-fetched--but it wouldn't apply to photos, I don't think.

-- MSA


That was based on the notion that Matt's fingertips were so sensitive that he could feel the shapes of the individual letters on the page, in the same way one "reads" Braille. It wouldn't work for photos.


ClarkKent_DC said:


Commander Benson said:
Dave Blanchard said:

[Daredevil] also had the rare superpower, shared only by Superman, of convincing people that he was a different person merely by wearing glasses (cf., Mike Murdock).


And by Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.

Hey! I'll have you know that eyeglasses make for an excellent disguise! Even for a dog!


LOL!

Man, it's been a while since that's come up.

 


"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." -Groucho Marx

Check out the Secret Headquarters (my store) website! Comics and Games for Everyone!

I used to listen to WOXY.com; It was the future of rock-n-roll! RIP WOXY


Dagwan said:


ClarkKent_DC said:


Commander Benson said:
Dave Blanchard said:

[Daredevil] also had the rare superpower, shared only by Superman, of convincing people that he was a different person merely by wearing glasses (cf., Mike Murdock).


And by Diana Prince, who throughout the Golden and Silver Ages, got away with concealing her Wonder Woman identity behind a pair of glasses. Hmmph . . . some military intelligence agent Steve Trevor was.

Hey! I'll have you know that eyeglasses make for an excellent disguise! Even for a dog!


LOL!

Man, it's been a while since that's come up.

 


It never fails to crack me up. Not the idea of a dog in disguise, nor the idea of a dog wearing eyeglasses as a disguise; it's the idea that a dog, in disguise, puts on eyeglasses but still wears the bright red cape with the yellow S shield!

Ace the Bat-Hound wore a mask. So did the Silent Knight's horse, Rona.

In Krypto's stories from Superman Family, he had a device that put a large, brown spot on his back and had a secret identity as "Skip"!

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