I've been a fan of Marvel's monsters for as long as I've been reading comics. This discussion will be divided into two "phases." Phase One will be "The Monster Age" and will focus on monsters which will cross over into Phase Two, "The Marvel Age," particularly those who have a connection with the Incredible Hulk. I'll start with...

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All I can say is that Tony Isabella is from Cleveland. :)

Also, there was a protest that the name of Graumann's Chinese Theater had recently changed to Mann's.

Know Anything about that? I got the impression that Graumann's/Mann's and Chinatown were supposed to be in the same vicinity, but the mistake could have been mine.

The Chinese Theatre was never associated with anyone actually Chinese until recently. It was built by Sid Grauman in 1927, who named it after himself. He also built the Egyptian Theatre, also in Hollywood. It was called the Mann's Chinese from 1973 to 2001 when it was part of the Mann Theatres chain. After this it was restored and renamed Grauman's Chinese Theatre again. Being resold a few times, it is now officially called the TCL Chinese Theatre, being owned by a Chinese manufacturing company named TCL.

The theatre is 30 miles from Chinatown.

Thanks for the info! I'm going to copy that post and put it between the pages of Astonishing Tales #24. Actually, I'll put it between those pages in the Marvel Horror Omnibus. When i started this discussion it wasn't out yet, but by the time I got to Colossus I was able to read it in the omni (which also includes the originals, the gargoyle story and Fin Fang Foom).

MARVEL FEATURE #3:

“A Titan Lurks Among Us” is partially based on an old Joe Orlando EC story about a Kukla, fran & Ollie-style puppet who contolled children’s minds as a prelude to invasion. (That, and Roy Thomas’ desire to have the “old Hulk” meet the new Hulk.) At the time the story was written, a different kind of puppet show was popular, one which featured a “big bird,” so that’s the kind of “puppet” Xemnu became.

You may recall, the last we saw of Xemnu he had accidentally “hypnotized” the atoms of his body to disperse. (If you don’t, scroll up to Journey into Mystery #66, above.) His atoms kind of floated around in space until an astronaut performing EVA was possessed by them. After landing, the [mind-controlled] astronauts resigned in order to cash in on their reputations. This led to a children’s show featuring a huge fuzzy creature which became immensely popular. Every episode, as the rating grew, the creature stated his intention to return to the “Magic Planet” on a particular date, a date which coincided with a U.S. missile launch.

The Hulk’s friend Jim Wilson was just on the cusp f adulthood, and could still feel the mental energy Xemnu was using to control the children. Jim contacted Dr. Strange and Dr. Strange got in touch with the other Defenders. On the day of the flight, children from all over were drawn to the launch site. (This story also bears some similarities to the Pied Piper. Because children loved him and parents hated him, it also foreshadows a certain purple dinosaur.) the Defenders converge of the launch pad and defeat Xemnu. The Sub-Mariner and Hulk leave, vowing not to answer any future summons. Sh’yeah… right.

That sounds a bit like the plot of the movie Space Children.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

MARVEL FEATURE #3:

“A Titan Lurks Among Us” is partially based on an old Joe Orlando EC story about a Kukla, fran & Ollie-style puppet who contolled children’s minds as a prelude to invasion. (That, and Roy Thomas’ desire to have the “old Hulk” meet the new Hulk.) At the time the story was written, a different kind of puppet show was popular, one which featured a “big bird,” so that’s the kind of “puppet” Xemnu became.

You may recall, the last we saw of Xemnu he had accidentally “hypnotized” the atoms of his body to disperse. (If you don’t, scroll up to Journey into Mystery #66, above.) His atoms kind of floated around in space until an astronaut performing EVA was possessed by them. After landing, the [mind-controlled] astronauts resigned in order to cash in on their reputations. This led to a children’s show featuring a huge fuzzy creature which became immensely popular. Every episode, as the rating grew, the creature stated his intention to return to the “Magic Planet” on a particular date, a date which coincided with a U.S. missile launch.

The Hulk’s friend Jim Wilson was just on the cusp f adulthood, and could still feel the mental energy Xemnu was using to control the children. Jim contacted Dr. Strange and Dr. Strange got in touch with the other Defenders. On the day of the flight, children from all over were drawn to the launch site. (This story also bears some similarities to the Pied Piper. Because children loved him and parents hated him, it also foreshadows a certain purple dinosaur.) the Defenders converge of the launch pad and defeat Xemnu. The Sub-Mariner and Hulk leave, vowing not to answer any future summons. Sh’yeah… right.

I completely forgot the entire "It, the Living Colossus" series, except that it involved the old '50s monster, because I wasn't really interested in the adventures of a giant stone statue when it came out. I was in high school by then, and wanted my comics to be serious and literary. Giant stone statues don't lend themselves to subtlety or literary nuance. I dutifully bought and read them, but they more or less didn't happen on Earth-Cap. I forgot them immediately after reading.

Evidently, it just hit me at the wrong time. Now in my dotage, the idea of a '50s monster encountering (and inevitably fighting) other '50s monsters is one that really appeals to my inner 10-year-old, who is far more distant than when I was in my teens, and therefore needs more nurturing.

There must have been a lot of other readers like me at the time, since "It" essentially died in childbirth. Which is too bad -- if "It" had re-introduced the likes of Grottu, Anuxu and that alien that was challenged to a sleeping contest (yes, it happened!), they could all be part of the MU now with long histories that could be adapted into movies. Marvel Films could challenge Toho as king of the giant kaiju, and we'd all be the better for it.

I also forgot the 24-issue Godzilla series that involved Dum-Dum Dugan (now retconned as an LMD at the time) and SHIELD. Did the Big G meet any of Marvel's Kirby Kreatures?

“Evidently, it just hit me at the wrong time."

You're probably right.

"Now in my dotage, the idea of a '50s monster encountering (and inevitably fighting) other '50s monsters is one that really appeals to my inner 10-year-old…”

See, I was 10 years old at the time.

“Did the Big G meet any of Marvel's Kirby Kreatures?”

No, I don't think so.

I think the closest Godzilla came was fighting Devil  Dinosaur.

Didn't he fight the Shogun Warriors? That was either bargain basement Jet Jaguar or proto-Pacific Rim.
None of which has anything to do with Kirby. I'm just more off-topic than usual today.

“I wasn't really interested in the adventures of a giant stone statue when it came out.”

And you’re not the only one. One of the most useful backissue guides I own is FantaCo’s Chronicles Annual (1983), and here is what they have to say about it: “An awful series from Isabella and Ayers. It was a reworking of one of Marvel’s pre-1962 monsters. Avoid it.” Oh, well… that’s what makes horseraces. For an alternate point of view, see Isabella’s editorial from Astonishing Tales #22 (yes, also included in the Marvel Horror omnibus). When I wrote to “Tony’s tips” back in the ‘90s, he wrote back and told me he was “glad [I] liked it.”

Also, I was mistaken when I said Googam has not appeared in the modern age. There is a two-page humor feature titled “Goom’s Fairy Tales” in the Monster-Size Hulk one-shot, in which Goom terrifies young Googam with tales of the Hulk battling Rorgg, Tim Boo Ba, Goliath (Bloodstone’s foe), Lo-Karr and Fin Fang Foom. Well, I did say “unless it was in a more recent story” and besides, it’s not exactly in continuity.

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