In the early Silver Age issues of X-men, Daredevil, and seeral other Marvel books,  the printing/distribution schedule would only allow for every other month publication of some marvel books.

 

Do we have a list of which books were on that limited schedule and for how long?

My guess is that the X-men was running for almost 12 issues (TWO YEARS!) before being allowed to go monthly.

 

In the case of Daredevil, I suspect it was one year of bi-monthly publication before graduating.

 

Does anyone know how often the original six issues of the Hulk comic book came out before it was cancelled?  And is it true that it was cancelled to make way for something called "Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos"?

 

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I've read that Goodman set up these different companies on paper (Zenith, Canam, Vista, etc.) so that if one of them went out of business, it wouldn't drag down the whole line. The collapse of his Atlas distribution company in '57 spooked him pretty badly, it seems.
I don't think it started then. I think he'd long done things that way.

When and how did Atlas go down.  I know it was a forerunner of Marvel, and the approximate time period, but could anyone explain a bit more of this?

I know that Jack Kirby had described returning to the offices that would eventually become Marvel, and walked in to find Stan "sitting there crying, saying 'their going to come take the furniture away next" so he sat down and designed some new ideas, new books, new characters and helped launch what became the Marvel Age of comics....not as an affront or challenge to Stan, but as a act of confidence, to buckle down and start doing what he did best...dreaming up new concept, new characters, new angles...and it worked.  The struggling company held on, and given time, found an audience.

At least, that's what I recall reading in an oral history from Jack, many years later. (Please don't ask me for the source. I've read so many that I couldn't say whether it was from Mark Evanier,  Ronan Ro, Jim Steranko, Gary Groth, or someone else. I just don't recall who, but I recall the sentiment.)

I've read that comment from Jack, too, and it sounds like typical Kirby self-aggrandizing. Jack was a brilliant comics creator and I have great respect for his work, but his latter-day interviews -- where he took sole credit for creating everything at Marvel in the '60s -- should be taken with a very large grain of salt.


I think Overstreet said something about how Goodman had a bunch of fake companies before the Comics Code so that if one of his horror or crime comics got in trouble he could just close it down and pretend it wasn't one of his. Zenith, Vista, etc., may have been a few he kept after the Code.
 George said:

I've read that Goodman set up these different companies on paper (Zenith, Canam, Vista, etc.) so that if one of them went out of business, it wouldn't drag down the whole line. The collapse of his Atlas distribution company in '57 spooked him pretty badly, it seems.

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