Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Thanks, Jason. It is on my to read list.
No problem. I guess it's more than a few changes but they made a 6 part graphic novel series fit in a film. So cuts are expected. While the film has you rooting for either Knives or Ramona, the book added enough backstory to Kim the drummer that I was actually rooting for her. She came across as a bit of a downer in the movie.
The Pink Panther (1964). Awesome. It's Peter Sellers' first appearance as Inspector Clouseau, and he does play the character somewhat more lightly than in the later movies. It's supposed to be a David Niven movie, but Sellers absolutely steals the show. If you've never seen it, I highly recommend it.
Spencer's Mountain (1963). This movie is based on the same book as was the basis for The Waltons. Henry Fonda and Maureen O'Hara are Clay and Olivia Spencer, and James MacArthur is the oldest son, Clayboy. Young Veronica Cartwright is the oldest daughter, and Victor French (Little House, Highway to Heaven) and Mike Henry (soon to be Tarzan and later Donald Penobscot of M*A*S*H) play two of Clay's brothers. If you have any nostalgia for The Waltons, give this movie a look.
...I saw the documentary film MAKING THE BOYS , a " making-of " about the writing & production of Mart Crowley's play , " The Boys In The Band " , and its film version , in the 60s , and reaction to it/what happened top the creating/acting men...

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) -- Another on my list of "Movies I've Always Wanted To See."  Ronald Colman rocks.  Actually, pretty much everybody rocks in this movie.  I love it when films live up to their reputations.  Thank you, TCM.

Next up (also thanks to TCM) -- The Prisoner of Zenda (1952).  According to Robert Osborne, this is a shot-for-shot, same-script remake of the '37 version. (And when has Robert Osborne ever lead me wrong?)  There are people who will understand why I would want to watch this one.  My wife is not one of them.

 

Isn't there a remake starring Peter Sellers from the 70s?

Doctor Hmmm? said:

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) -- Another on my list of "Movies I've Always Wanted To See."  Ronald Colman rocks.  Actually, pretty much everybody rocks in this movie.  I love it when films live up to their reputations.  Thank you, TCM.

Next up (also thanks to TCM) -- The Prisoner of Zenda (1952).  According to Robert Osborne, this is a shot-for-shot, same-script remake of the '37 version. (And when has Robert Osborne ever lead me wrong?)  There are people who will understand why I would want to watch this one.  My wife is not one of them.

 

Yes.  I believe that Prisoner is one of the most filmed (and otherwise adapted or homaged) novels ever.

Doctor Hmmm? said:

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) -- Another on my list of "Movies I've Always Wanted To See."  Ronald Colman rocks.  Actually, pretty much everybody rocks in this movie.  I love it when films live up to their reputations.  Thank you, TCM.

Next up (also thanks to TCM) -- The Prisoner of Zenda (1952).  According to Robert Osborne, this is a shot-for-shot, same-script remake of the '37 version. (And when has Robert Osborne ever lead me wrong?)  There are people who will understand why I would want to watch this one.  My wife is not one of them.

 


That was a distinctly odd experience -- especially watching them on consecutive days, when the original was still fresh enough in my mind that I could notice a changed line or changed shot. On the whole, I think I prefer the '37 version, but Stewart Granger was a very good Rudolph.
Bell Book and Candle (1958). Kim Novak plays a witch who uses her power to make Jimmy Stewart fall in love with her in revenge for things his fiancee did to her in college. She then falls in love with him. Jack Lemmon is her warlock brother, Nicky. Elsa Lanchester is her slightly-off aunt. This movie was possibly an inspiration for the Bewitched series. When Nicky uses his powers, the sound effect is the same as the later Wonder Twins' power activation sound. It's worth watching, if only for the scenes in which Kim Novak concentrates her spells through her familiar, a Siamese cat. Meow!

Oh, I'd definitely be one of that -- that sounds cool!



Doctor Hmmm? said:

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) -- Another on my list of "Movies I've Always Wanted To See."  Ronald Colman rocks.  Actually, pretty much everybody rocks in this movie.  I love it when films live up to their reputations.  Thank you, TCM.

Next up (also thanks to TCM) -- The Prisoner of Zenda (1952).  According to Robert Osborne, this is a shot-for-shot, same-script remake of the '37 version. (And when has Robert Osborne ever lead me wrong?)  There are people who will understand why I would want to watch this one.  My wife is not one of them.

 

The other night I watched The Neighborhood Barber Shop, a quiet independent movie starring John Ratzenberger (Cliff from Cheers). It was pretty good, even if it was fairly predictable.

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