Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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That reminds me: wasn't a TV tuned to Frankenstein in the Doctor Who movie? And wasn't a TV turned to a classic sci-fi film in the original Halloween? The Day the Earth Stood Still, maybe? Night of the Living Dead? Anyway...

THE INVISIBLE BOY: The last time we tried to watch this, my VHS tape was defective so we ordered it in DVD. I couldn't find it, but luckily Tracy was able to verify where it was through our Amazon order history. I know we've watched this together before, but why if we hadn't watched the othe "Invisible" movies? (It's not even Universal; it's MGM.) The answer is that I don't think of it as the six (or seventh, depending upon your count) "Invisible" movie; it's the second "Robbie the Robot" movie. The answer is we obtained it an the 50th anniversary edition of "Forbidden Planet" (the first "Robbie the Robot" movie). the movie itself is light-hearted, but also serious as a super-computer tries to rule the world using Robbie as its tool.

They're watching Forbidden Planet and The Thing From Another World in Halloween.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

That reminds me: wasn't a TV tuned to Frankenstein in the Doctor Who movie? And wasn't a TV turned to a classic sci-fi film in the original Halloween? The Day the Earth Stood Still, maybe? Night of the Living Dead? Anyway...

Ah. Thanks.

Yeah, it was, paralleling regeneration and reanimation.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

That reminds me: wasn't a TV tuned to Frankenstein in the Doctor Who movie?

DRACULA'S DAUGHTER (1936): This one picks up immediately after the end of Dracula and, although it has its moments, never really clicked with me. For one thing, Countess Marya Zaleska's relationship to her "father" is not well-defined, and Gloria Holden brings little to the role. I consider series such as The Mummy, The Creature and The Invisible Man to be part of the "monster" series, regardless of the fact they were not tied to the "crossover" movies, but the Dracula sequels? Not so much. I can take them or leave them.

We bought a bigger TV off my nephew yesterday -- this this is a monster! -- and decided we'd break it in with Stop Making Sense, streaming on Amazon Prime. I love David Byrne's music, with or without Talking Heads, and I love Jonathan Demme's films...but had somehow never seen this concert film before. It's a treat, totally living up to its rep. The band is captivating, and the way it grows and grows, song by song, is a real pleasure to watch and hear. And suddenly I understand the hilarious appeal of the Big Suit. 

Also: Look out for American Utopia, a new David Byrne concert film coming out soon from Spike Lee. We saw the American Utopia tour live a couple years ago, and it's one of the best concert experiences I've ever had. Mesmerizing stuff.


If anyone wants to join me, I'll be attending the New York Film Festival virtually these next few weeks. Pick out a few movies and take a look! (I've added a thread about it.)

The first film I saw via New York Film Festival was The Monopoly of Violence, a documentary by journalist David Dufresne, about the police's use of force during the gilet jaunes, or “yellow vest,” protests. 

By turns visceral and fascinating, the film compiles footage of genuine police violence (often hard to watch), and, among other things, replays it for the victims of that violence to watch. And consider. And discuss with other people involved in the state's use of force: police officers, police union leaders, a UN representative, a journalist, a lawyer, some historians...and of course, other victims. 

At stake is not only the continuation of the violence itself, but the very definition of violence; in one scene, a letter from an archbishop describes three types of violence: Institutional violence; violence in revolt to those institutions; and finally, violence to quell that revolt. But the law-and-order tendencies of society often only allow that second form of violence -- the revolutionary violence -- to be called by that name, while the others get euphemisms like "peacekeeping." It's a fascinating discussion, made even more interesting in that we're not told the interviewee's positions in a chyron beforehand; we can only judge their arguments on their own merits.

 

Just saw our second film from the NY Film Festival, Night of the Kings, directed by Philippe Lacôte.

It's an exciting movie -- a new prisoner in the Ivory Coast's MACA prison is recruited to tell stories to his fellow prisoners over a long, portentous night, and soon finds out that when he finishes his story, he'll be killed. So his only option is for him to keep adding to it, like Scheherazade.

The movie fascinates -- partially because of the tale he tells, but even more so in the way it's told in the prison, as his fellow prisoners participate in the storytelling by adding spontaneous dance and choreography to the story beats, illustrating what's happening as it gets told, like a physical Greek chorus.

Watching a horror movie a day for October.  So far:

1)Bride of the Monster (1955)
2)Frankenstein (1931)
3)Dracula (1931) (Spanish-language version)
4)One Missed Call (2003)
5)One Missed Call 2 (2005)
6)One Missed Call (2007) American re-make
7)Whispering Corridors (1998)
8)Memento Mori (1999)

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

We bought a bigger TV off my nephew yesterday -- this this is a monster! -- and decided we'd break it in with Stop Making Sense, streaming on Amazon Prime. I love David Byrne's music, with or without Talking Heads, and I love Jonathan Demme's films...but had somehow never seen this concert film before. It's a treat, totally living up to its rep. The band is captivating, and the way it grows and grows, song by song, is a real pleasure to watch and hear. And suddenly I understand the hilarious appeal of the Big Suit. 

Also: Look out for American Utopia, a new David Byrne concert film coming out soon from Spike Lee. We saw the American Utopia tour live a couple years ago, and it's one of the best concert experiences I've ever had. Mesmerizing stuff.

I love Stop Making Sense, too! 

I love me some Lugosi, but the Spanish language version of Dracula is wonderful!

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