Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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I liked Stand By Me and The Breakfast Club, and not liking a movie because it is "bullshit" seems kind of weird to me. Isn't that almost all movies?

The Breakfast Club, came out when I was in junior high. It never once bothered me that they were in detention unsupervised, because it was a movie. What did ring true was the part of them getting along, but also acknowledging that they wouldn't outside of detention. I saw interactions like that a lot.

Now Robert Altman...For me, like most, he has his hits an misses. I've never seen The Player though. This is a good reminder to check it out. M*A*S*H is an all-time favorite. I've mentioned before that the movie ruined the TV series for me. I didn't hate McCabe & Mrs. Miller, I thought it was uneven. I couldn't even finish The Long Goodbye

I saw The Breakfast Club when I was in college, and it really resonated with me and my buddies at the timer.  I still get all misty-eyed when I hear Simple Minds' "(Don't You) Forget About me" on the radio.  Of course, I haven't seen it since college, so I don't know what I'd think of it now.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

I've never seen Stand By Me and have never had any desire to. Now I have even less. I'll tell you another movie from the same time period that I find just as "bullshit" though: The Breakfast Club. First of all, the premise is literally fantastic (in that it is sheer fantasy that five teenagers would be left unsupervised in a school setting on a Saturday). I was in college at the time  I first saw it (majoring in English education), but that's not why I found it utterly unbelievable. I found it unbelievable because I  had previously gone to high school and currently lived in the real world. A couple of years ago I was on a transatlantic flight and, after I caught up on several Marvel movies, found myself with nothing else of interest to watch. I decided to watch The Breakfast Club to see if it was as bad as I remembered. It was bullshit!

I saw both of those movies when I was in my late 30s. I had read the original novela (The Body) that became Stand by Me. If it was different than the original it wasn't enough to be jarring, IIRC. 

I enjoy the actors in The Breakfast Club. I've been known to rewatch it every few years. Leaving the students unsupervised was a story element in that the guy was a terrible person.

I haven't seen MASH in a while, but I always found it problematic, well made but overrated. However, I like a lot of Altman's movies (The Player, Nashville), with Short Cuts, I think, being my favorite.

"What did ring true was the part of them getting along, but also acknowledging that they wouldn't outside of detention."

I liked that aspect of The Breakfast Club when I was in college. Someone had an idea to throw five diverse characters in a room together and see what happens. But how to get them together...? In 2017 I discovered that I can no long overlook the fact that their "solution" is implausible.

"I saw The Breakfast Club when I was in college, and it really resonated with me and my buddies at the time."

The movie that really resonated with me at the time was The Big Chill. I haven't seen it since, though. 

Regarding M*A*S*H, comparing the movie to the TV show is like comparing Star Wars to Star Trek. If pressed, I would choose the book.

THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN: The third part of Terry Gilliam's "Trilogy of Imagination."  Knowing that Time Bandits, Brazil and TAoBM present a thematic trilogy of sorts, I liked them all better than I might have otherwise individually. TAoBM reminded me of a cross between Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Return to Oz. TAoBM can be seen through the eyes of the old man, but it can also be seen through the eyes of the little girl, making it a counterpart to Time Bandits in a way. I think Time Bandits and TAoBM (along with Return to Oz) make excellent children's films. I have often performed "thought experiments" on my friends' kids but, having no kids of my own to experiment on, I don't often have the opportunity to follow up decades later to see how they turned out.

THE PRINCESS BRIDE: A recent episode of This Is Us referenced The Princess Bride. Tracy asked me, "You know what that's from, don't you?" but I had no clue, despite having watched it with her for the first time in October 2019. Because I 'forced" Tracy to watch three movies in a row she didn't particularly care for, she insisted we watch The Princess Bride again because I "wasn't paying attention" the first time. It was like seeing it for the first time. I remembered Wallace Shawn was in it (which is why I agreed to watch it three years ago) and that he had a single-word catchphrase, although I couldn't remember what that word was. I'll never forget it again, I promise (or I'll lie). 

Another Altman movie I'd recommend would be Gosford Park -- basically Downton Abbey with a murder. In fact, it was written by Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes. 

The last two movies I saw were Funeral Parade of Roses (dir: Toshio Matsumoto, 1969), a retelling of Oedipus Rex, but set in a late-60s Japanese transgender brothel. I first heard of this movie when I looked into Peter, who plays the fool character in Akira Kurasawa's King Lear adaptation Ran. This was Peter's first movie, and I noticed it was on the TCM app and about to fall off, so I took it as my one chance to see it. It's a strange one -- told out of sequence and with a lot of quick cuts, and mimics the French New Wave style from a few years before. And it all ends up in a gory mess, as befits an Oedipus retelling. It's got some tired/stereotypical storytelling tropes with regard to the transgender characters, but while it's behind our times, it certainly was ahead of its own.

But considering how disturbingly it ends, I wanted to chase it with a palate cleanser. I went with the Coen Brothers' 2010 adaptation of True Grit, starring Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, but most important, Hailee Steinfeld as Mattie Ross, the wild west's pluckiest engine of justice. This is a fantastic film, that works on every level -- but especially on the level of transporting you to another time and place and getting you completely lost in the story. 

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I went with the Coen Brothers' 2010 adaptation of True Grit, starring Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, but most important, Hailee Steinfeld as Mattie Ross, the wild west's pluckiest engine of justice. This is a fantastic film, that works on every level -- but especially on the level of transporting you to another time and place and getting you completely lost in the story. 

It's a very good movie, better than the John Wayne version.

When we were discussing Hawkeye I commented that was glad Hailee's arm grew back.

A short time ago I watched the 1947 version of Nightmare Alley, which starred Tyrone Power as the sociopathic lead character, Stanton Carlisle. Power was quoted as saying it was his favorite of all his roles. I still recommend this version even though it was crippled by the Hays Code, especially the tacked-on happy ending. Here's the trailer:

Nightmare Alley (1947) trailer

I just saw the 2021 version of the story, adapted by Guillermo del Toro directly from the very popular book that was new when the original movie was made. The book was attacked and banned at the time (sound familiar?) as was the movie. Today's more liberal rating system allows the new movie, also set in the 40s, to be more in-your-face. It is also longer, which allows more of the original story (which I haven't read) to be included. Bradley Cooper does a fine job as Carlisle. The rest of the cast IMO is more talented than the cast of the original. Here's the trailer:

Nightmare Alley (2021) trailer

I recently watched Wind River, and I loved it. Jeremy Renner is a hunter for the US Fish and Wildlife agency,and while on a hunt he discovers a body on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Because of the arcane laws of the reservations, the FBI is called in. They send their closest agent, played by Elizabeth Olsen.

They run through several suspects, before we find the killer. While watching it, this reminded me of these neo-Westerns like Hell or High Water. Sure enough this was created by Taylor Sheridan who also made Hell or High Water, as well as the TV shows Yellowstone and 1883. So, if you like those, I think you will dig this as well

Since this is a film with Native Americans, it seems like Hollywood is obligated to include Graham Greene. This movie is no exception. He is great, as per usual.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

I recently watched Wind River, and I loved it. Jeremy Renner is a hunter for the US Fish and Wildlife agency,and while on a hunt he discovers a body on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Because of the arcane laws of the reservations, the FBI is called in. They send their closest agent, played by Elizabeth Olsen.

I haven't seen Wind River, but it's become clear over the years that the Reservations are independent of state and county jurisdiction. Anything that can't be dealt with by the tribal police has to involve the FBI and/or other federal agencies.

I highly recommend the series Longmire. ( Longmire (TV series) - Wikipedia ). The first three seasons were on the A&E network after which Netflix did three more seasons. It is wonderfully immersed in Native American Reservation politics and culture. The writing and acting is top notch. Try it. You'll be glad you did. It's set in modern times. The sheriff wears a cowboy hat but it is not a western.

Yesterday I re-watched  Daikaijū Gamera (1965)  Director Noriaki Yuasa was by everyone else at the studio because they all thought the film would tank.  In the end, the picture was a much bigger hit than anyone had expected it to be.

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