Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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I finally cracked open a birthday gift from a couple of years ago: The Blues Brothers extended DVD. It runs about 20 minutes longer than the theatrical release -- about two and a half hours -- mostly by trimming away lines here and there and little moments at the beginning and ending of various scenes throughout. (The differences are detailed here.)

Most of this cutting-room floor material makes no difference to the tale, save three:

There's a scene where Elwood, at work in a factory, grabs a couple spray cans of adhesive off the line, which presumably explains why he has them later. Immediately after that, he goes to the boss's office and quits his job, saying he plans to become a priest. He's wearing safety glasses, which is the only time we see his eyes. It works better to have left that out.

The scene where Elwood uses the glue on the gas pedal of the Winnebago parked outside the hotel where the concert is going on is followed by a bit where he injects it into the tire of one of the police cars also parked outside. Later, when the chase begins, that gimmicked tire blows, causing a chain-reaction crash of dozens of police cars parked near it.

There's also a bit added to the gas station scene: After the tank truck finally arrives and they fill up, as Jake and Elwood are leaving, they carelessly start a fire that causes the tank truck and then the gas station to explode. Of all the gratuitous destruction in that movie, it seemed so gratuitous that it was better left out, I think.

I'm told that when Dan Acroyd proposed this movie, he wrote a "bible" of background information on all the characters. In fact, there is an actual reason why the blues mobile can fly at the ending...and a ton of background information that he had created for each character, but none of which came to the screen.

People who read his "treatment" were blown away by the detail that he had supplied, and say it was far more than was needed for one movie (let alone a sequel...we're not going to discuss BB2000, which I just received for Xmas... don't make me go there...)

Anyway, the only element or two of the backstory that made it into the picture was the blue glow that surrounds Jake when he "sees the light" in the church of James Brown and starts doing backflips....  and the floating nun who assends the stairs at the beginning of the adventure.

As I recall, the blues mobile was outfited with a supercharged jet engine or something that bordered on supernatural, but in Acroyd's mind, all those details had to be there to make sense of the story....  something that wasn't necessary for the drunk/stoned/college kids who flocked to see the picture when it came out.

"As I recall, the blues mobile was outfited with a supercharged jet engine or something that bordered on supernatural, but in Acroyd's mind, all those details had to be there to make sense of the story....  something that wasn't necessary for the 'drunk/stoned/college kids who flocked to see the picture when it came out."

This movie took a LONG time to become one of my favorites.  It was a case where (and I stopped doing this decades ago) I actually read the novelization just before the movie came out, and as a result, I was disappointed with the film. And yes, it did strike me it was aimed at a drugged-out audience.  Years later, on cable, it slowly started to grow on me.  Now it's a perrennial favorite.  But back then... honest!

One detail in the book MISSING from the movie is that Morrie Sline set Jake up with the gig at Bob's Country Bunker. AND, presumably, to do this, he also gave The Good Old Boys bad directions (or told them the wrong time).  This explains why Jake just "happens" to find a bar where the advertised band DIDN'T SHOW UP until after the show was over! This was the one bit of "missing" info that really bothered me when I saw the film.  The film, as it stands, makes it seem like Jake had no idea where he was going, and the country bar was just incredible dumb luck. I could never see, from the existing film, why The Good Old Boys got pissed as Jake & Elwood, when, after all, it was The Good Old Boys who showed up 3 HOURS LATE.

I do get a little tired of seeing people at the IMDB discuss "expanded" versions of movies AS IF they were the "official" version that everyone has been watching FOR DECADES.  (This also goes for ENTER THE DRAGON-- I sure hope the "original" version is still available out there on DVD, otherwise, I would not want to buy it, I've seen the "expanded" version and in that case, it RUINS the film-- and I don't know why nobody sees this-- the cuts were CORRECT in the first place.)

Henry R. Kujawa said:

 

One detail in the book MISSING from the movie is that Morrie Sline set Jake up with the gig at Bob's Country Bunker. AND, presumably, to do this, he also gave The Good Old Boys bad directions (or told them the wrong time).  This explains why Jake just "happens" to find a bar where the advertised band DIDN'T SHOW UP until after the show was over! This was the one bit of "missing" info that really bothered me when I saw the film.  The film, as it stands, makes it seem like Jake had no idea where he was going, and the country bar was just incredible dumb luck. I could never see, from the existing film, why The Good Old Boys got pissed as Jake & Elwood, when, after all, it was The Good Old Boys who showed up 3 HOURS LATE.

 

Yeah, that's a huge hole in the story. I can squint my eyes at the "Direct from Nashville" text painted on the side of The Good Old Boys' vehicle and assume that, somehow, driving from Nashville to Chicago, they got lost or ran into traffic or something. I guess that also explains how Bob of Bob's Country Bunker didn't know he was dealing with imposters ... I guess.

One plot hole I can't figure out: Jake and Elwood are in the car after the concert, about to make their getaway. Elwood says, "It's 106 miles to Chicago, we got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark... and we're wearing sunglasses." 

If they're only 106 miles away, why did it take them all night to get there?  It should have taken a hour and a half! And at the speeds they were going, probably only an hour! 

 

Kirk G said:

Anyway, the only element or two of the backstory that made it into the picture was the blue glow that surrounds Jake when he "sees the light" in the church of James Brown and starts doing backflips....  and the floating nun who assends the stairs at the beginning of the adventure.

As I recall, the blues mobile was outfited with a supercharged jet engine or something that bordered on supernatural, but in Acroyd's mind, all those details had to be there to make sense of the story....  something that wasn't necessary for the drunk/stoned/college kids who flocked to see the picture when it came out.

 

Sometimes, I think, it's better to not explain things, especially if the explanation is nonsense, or burdensome. Like the car; it can do what it does because it can do what it does.

 

The Blues Brothers works for me because I think of it as a live-action cartoon.

 

 

 

I can honestly say, after watching The Blues Brothers for a couple of decades, that those "plot holes" never even occurred to me, let alone bothered me.  ;)

"Sometimes, I think, it's better to not explain things, especially if the explanation is nonsense, or burdensome. Like the car; it can do what it does because it can do what it does."

A lot that happens is "simple".  It's a "CATHOLIC" movie involving the supernatural. Someone at the IMDB said the Catholic Church actually praised the film. Crazy, huh?

There were supernatural elements in the sequel, as well (although they involved VOODOO...).

I suppose there should be a genre for this type of film... "DOGMA" would also fit in there.

the only thing that bothers me about The Blues Brothers is how the car at the end fell from such a great height after having driven off an uncompleted overpass!

I just read a bunch of trivia in the IMDB on Blues Brothers and learned that uncompleted overpass was an entrance ramp for an uncompleted interchange in Milwauke or Minneapolis that was since torn down.  I remember an impossibly high bridge being built in Zilwaukee, Michigan that eventually collapsed while being built...and then was finished, about the same time.


Plus, the IMDB talks about the blues mobile being parked next to power transformers at the mall, and getting supercharged from that, giving it the supernatural abilities I had refered to.

We always laughed harder at the absurd heigh of the Nazi car drop at the end, precisely because it was so obviously exagerated. Did you know that the producers had to get a certificatioin for the FAA that the car WOULDN'T fly before they were granted permission to drop it?  Crazy!

Agreed, Doc.   There are folks here who are taking THE BLUES BROTHERS waaaay too seriously.  It's not the type of movie where every single thing has to have an explanation or be explained.

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

I can honestly say, after watching The Blues Brothers for a couple of decades, that those "plot holes" never even occurred to me, let alone bothered me.  ;)

Derrick Ferguson said:

Agreed, Doc.   There are folks here who are taking THE BLUES BROTHERS waaaay too seriously.  It's not the type of movie where every single thing has to have an explanation or be explained.


S'funny, I thought I said:

 

ClarkKent_DC said:

The Blues Brothers works for me because I think of it as a live-action cartoon.

 

That said ... sometimes, like we used to say on the old board, that 11th impossible thing is just too much to swallow. Showing a high-speed chase with cars going up to 120 miles an hour and still taking all night to travel a mere 106 miles is that 11th impossible thing for me.

 
Henry R. Kujawa said:

I do get a little tired of seeing people at the IMDB discuss "expanded" versions of movies AS IF they were the "official" version that everyone has been watching FOR DECADES.  (This also goes for ENTER THE DRAGON-- I sure hope the "original" version is still available out there on DVD, otherwise, I would not want to buy it, I've seen the "expanded" version and in that case, it RUINS the film-- and I don't know why nobody sees this-- the cuts were CORRECT in the first place.)

I expect that some of those people have seen only the expanded versions, especially if their only exposure to said film is the DVD. The Blues Brothers DVD we've been talking about has only the expanded version on it.

Speaking of ETD... now watching FORCE: FIVE.  Same producer, same writer-director.  Same plot structure. Both take place on an island.  And the villain is played by the guy who played the villain in "Fistful of Yen" (in KENTUCKY FRIED MOVIE).  I'm not making this up!!!

Oh yeah, and it's very obvious this film served as an inspiration for THE A-TEAM.  (Especially when the chopper pilot is referred to as being "psycho" and has to be broken out of prison before he can go on the mission.)

I've also read the actual plot itself was a virtual remake of one of Jim Kelly's films-- HOT POTATO. It was then remade AGAIN as the 2nd story on THE A-TEAM (the 1st one to actually include Dirk Benedict).

Strangely enough, even though it's a really fun film, and feels like the pilot for a series, and could easily have had numerious sequels, there never were any, and most of its stars, who were all real-life martial artists, did very few movies. I keep wondering as I watch it now, why they got Joe Louis, instead of, say, Chuck Norris.

it may have been before Chuck Norris was a recognised martial artist.

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