Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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...Thank you . I guess it was " Mega-City ONE " , I was working from memory here . I've heard of the " Harlem's Heroes' " (Um...was Hogan's Heroes shown in the U.K. ???) strip .

  Actually , much of the art by the artists associated with 2AD's early years(Tending to be Meteterrain(Sp!!) Continentals , I recall ?) , Dredd aside , have had a (Especially with panel repros in that Dredd Mega-Zine's looks at the history of 2AD .) tsill loosw very " modern " look to me , as I recall..." Retro-modern " by now , I suppose , but...Yes , I realized that M-1 wasn't really " America " but it was the FORMER America .

  I do realize that British parody.criticism of perceived American over-" cowboyism " , etc. , is a frequent part of British popular culture , certainly in  that era of UK heroes...I accept it , and a point is/can be there in it , certainly !

( However , I DO think that " resentment over no longer being #1 " is a factor in that on UKers' part , too !!!!!!! Of course , whether the U.S. will take slipping off Number 1 - to China ??? They used to speculate Japan... - as gracefully as the UK did remains to be seen...As least , for the UK , Churchill , etc. I suppose tried to arrange a soft landing/" We're the Greeks " , etc....)

Jimmm Kelly said:

And I think the negative reaction of the critics at the time was partly due to the lapses in morals--which would have offended public standards of the time.

I don't get what you mean there. If you mean the scene in the cave, arguably Hitchcock went further with the Robert Donat/Madeleine Carroll bedroom scene in The Thirty-Nine Steps.

 Richard Willis said:

I remember seeing a page of original art (I think) at a convention. It had a thief who was a really fast runner. Dredd blew off both of his legs. This didn't inspire me to follow the character in the books.

 

2000 AD started as a boys' comic, but it had dark, violent element. Once it hit its stride "Judge Dredd" was imaginative and had elements of satire and wit, but I haven't read it for over twenty years and it had moved away from humour when I stopped looking in on it.

 

E.D. The atomic wasteland outside the cities is the Cursed Earth: I flubbed that in my post. I initially wrote that Mega-City One was initially just Mega-City, but I was just looking at a page from a very early story (the preview here, which happens to be from the first issue of 2000 AD I ever read) that used the number, so that doesn't seem to be right.

 

I don't know if Hogan's Heroes appeared in the UK, but probably. Harlem's Heroes were reportedly partly inspired by the Harlem Globetrotters.

 

(corrected)

Yeah, the Cursed Earth was where the cities weren't. And I use "cities" plural because two more were introduced in the stories I read, Texas City and Mega-City Two (San Franscisco/Los Angeles). Or maybe Texas City was Mega-City Two and the West Coast was Mega-City Three, I don't remember. At any rate, there were at least three Mega-Cities, all self-governing, but all with the Judge system.

There was also a Sov (Soviet) City, with Russian Judges. Their Judge uniforms looked very much like the U.S. version, only with Soviet iconography.

How the "Judge Dredd" strip struck me is that it really wasn't sure what it wanted to be. Yes, Dredd was ultra-violent and a fascist, something the Brits saw in U.S. culture that they condemned. And his humorlessness was often the butt of the joke; at times he seemed more like a parody than a character. And yet, he was also clearly the hero, and sometimes his fascism, ultra-violence and Manichean view of the world was all that stood between Mega-City One and disaster. So it was almost like the writers wanted to have it both ways, with Dredd both hero and fool as the script required. Perhaps that, too, is a reflection of sorts, not necessarily of American culture but of Britain under Thatcher. I'm not really sure.

Also, the premise of the series was kinda counter-intuitive in that what survives World War III is the major cities that would be the natural targets of nuclear weapons. New York survives, but Nebraska doesn't? That really doesn't make much sense.

...I think there was a the former U.K. (and Ireland ?) Mega-City , I think a South America one or two and I think one for Meteterrinian(Sp!!)/Spanish Europe??...Well , Wikipedia doubtless answers this !!!

...Worked for " KINGDOM COME " !!!!!!!!!!!

Captain Comics said:

Yeah, the Cursed Earth was where the cities weren't. And I use "cities" plural because two more were introduced in the stories I read, Texas City and Mega-City Two (San Franscisco/Los Angeles). Or maybe Texas City was Mega-City Two and the West Coast was Mega-City Three, I don't remember. At any rate, there were at least three Mega-Cities, all self-governing, but all with the Judge system.

There was also a Sov (Soviet) City, with Russian Judges. Their Judge uniforms looked very much like the U.S. version, only with Soviet iconography.

How the "Judge Dredd" strip struck me is that it really wasn't sure what it wanted to be. Yes, Dredd was ultra-violent and a fascist, something the Brits saw in U.S. culture that they condemned. And his humorlessness was often the butt of the joke; at times he seemed more like a parody than a character. And yet, he was also clearly the hero, and sometimes his fascism, ultra-violence and Manichean view of the world was all that stood between Mega-City One and disaster. So it was almost like the writers wanted to have it both ways, with Dredd both hero and fool as the script required. Perhaps that, too, is a reflection of sorts, not necessarily of American culture but of Britain under Thatcher. I'm not really sure.

Also, the premise of the series was kinda counter-intuitive in that what survives World War III is the major cities that would be the natural targets of nuclear weapons. New York survives, but Nebraska doesn't? That really doesn't make much sense.

I agree if it was intentional bombing the cities would be hit before the non-urbanized areas. The radioactive wasteland in Kingdom Come was caused by an unintentional explosion.

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Worked for " KINGDOM COME " !!!!!!!!!!!

Captain Comics said:

Also, the premise of the series was kinda counter-intuitive in that what survives World War III is the major cities that would be the natural targets of nuclear weapons. New York survives, but Nebraska doesn't? That really doesn't make much sense.

I once saw an article in an old almanac that listed the likeliest first-strike targets in the event of a nuclear war:

  • Any military installation.
  • Any state capital.
  • Any major manufacturing center.
  • Any airport.
  • Any seaport.
  • Any major city.

This list was accompanied by a map showing those targets. Looking at it, about the only safe place to be was Montana ... which is where all the survivalists hang out.



Richard Willis said:

I agree if it was intentional bombing the cities would be hit before the non-urbanized areas. The radioactive wasteland in Kingdom Come was caused by an unintentional explosion.

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Worked for " KINGDOM COME " !!!!!!!!!!!

Captain Comics said:

Also, the premise of the series was kinda counter-intuitive in that what survives World War III is the major cities that would be the natural targets of nuclear weapons. New York survives, but Nebraska doesn't? That really doesn't make much sense.

Cap said:

Yeah, the Cursed Earth was where the cities weren't. And I use "cities" plural because two more were introduced in the stories I read, Texas City and Mega-City Two (San Franscisco/Los Angeles). Or maybe Texas City was Mega-City Two and the West Coast was Mega-City Three, I don't remember. At any rate, there were at least three Mega-Cities, all self-governing, but all with the Judge system.

Mega-City Two is on the West Coast. I read the "Cursed Earth Saga" earlier this year and that is where it was.

Somehow I found myself loading up on Gabrielle Union movies:

The Honeymooners. Based on the old TV series, starring Cedric the Entertainer as Ralph Kramden, Mike Epps as Ed Norton, Gabrielle Union as Alice Kramden and Regina Hall as Trixie Norton. It brings the action to the here and now, with Ralph and Ed engaging in various get-rich-quick schemes, but this time there's a concrete goal: an opportunity to buy a house from a sweet little old lady. Problem is, the Kramdens and Nortons are short of funds for the down payment, but a developer -- who wants to raze the place -- has plenty of cash.

Cedric the Entertainer for Jackie Gleason? Hey, why not? This is no different than any other actor who grew up watching a beloved TV show and taking his shot at it when he's grown up, such as Johnny Depp in The Lone Ranger or Dark Shadows, or Seth Rogen in The Green Hornet, or Mike Myers in The Cat in the Hat.

Granted, all of those were lousy, mostly because the actors in those examples couldn't resist bending those properties to suit their eccentricities and their view of the world. (Mike Myers' The Cat in the Hat is a particularly foul example, but that's another discussion.) But Cedric and company make an honest effort here; they don't try to make it "edgy," or "hip," or try to subvert it (Johnny Depp's The Lone Ranger is a particularly foul example, but that's another discussion.)

That said: Cedric the Entertainer is no Jackie Gleason, and Mike Epps is no Art Carney. But they were passable.
I actually had a bigger problem with Gabrielle Union as Alice, because she's just way too gorgeous to believe as a dowdy housewife married to a bus driver. Well, in this movie, she and Trixie were both waitresses in a diner, but still.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Somehow I found myself loading up on Gabrielle Union movies:

 

Ain't nothing wrong with that.

The same night I was watching The Honeymooners on one channel, The Perfect Holiday was on another. Here, Gabrielle Union is a divorced mom who keeps bickering with her ex-husband, a music producer. Around Christmastime, she's feeling glum, so her daughter, when she sees Santa at the mall, asks him to say something nice to her mommy. The mall Santa, played by Morris Chestnut, is immediately smitten -- hey, it is Gabrielle Union, and she's gorgeous -- so they start going out. Complications ensue because the mall Santa is an aspiring songwriter trying to sell his work to the music producer. Thus, each of these three people is linked to the other two without knowing of the other person's connection. And, as they say, hilarity ensues. For some strange reason, Queen Latifah and Terrence Howard are floating around in this movie. 

It's a romantic comedy, and it's a Christmas movie. Set your expectations accordingly, and you'll do fine with it. 

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