Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 40985

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I watched The Fountainhead last week -- whoo boy, what a whacko movie! Say what you will about Ayn Rand's philosophy, but she couldn't write dialogue to save her life. It doesn't shy away in the least that the entire movie is full of self-absorbed creeps.

 Had a much better experience with Spike Jonez's adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are, which hit me exactly right. The Wild Things looked great and had some great performances (loved James Gandolfini and Lauren Ambrose) and Max Records was just amazing as Max. The film spends the first 15 minutes or so grounding the story in Max's real life; I found it incredibly affecting. I'll probably be buying this on Blu-Ray when I get a chance. It's a keeper.

I saw Selma for the second time yesterday.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is all wet. Selma deserved better in the way of nominations and deserves better in the way of awards.

I watched Boyhood last night. I enjoyed it. The story in and of itself is nothing new. It's about a boy growing up with divorced parents, we follow him from age 5 to 18. The compelling thing about this was it was shot over a 12 year period with the same cast! So we see this kid age before our eyes. The film flowed so well that it didn't feel like that was the case, sure you could see how the cast had aged but it still felt tight. It is long and I don't really see myself watching this again. However, I highly recommend checking it out.

 

I want to see all of the Oscar films before the actual Oscars. Mainly best picture nominees but I'd like to catch Foxcatcher and a few others as well. I haven't really attempted to do this in the past few years but will try this year. Usually I fall 1 or 2 films short by the time the show rolls around. This year though all but one nominee, Whiplash, is available in my town. I plan on seeing Intimidation Game tomorrow. So far I've seen American Sniper and Boyhood. The only one I'm not particularly interested in is Theory of Everything. Most of the feedback I've heard is that while the performances are terrific, the movie itself is rather dull. Also the Grand Budapest Hotel is one I think I have to be in the mood for. I like the director's films but they've got a certain dry quirkiness to them that doesn't always hit me right.

We were able to watch Grand Budapest Hotel on a Netflix disk. It was very enjoyable, better than the trailers.

Just rewatched Basil Rathbone in Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon. Good film, but it doesn't seem right seeing Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in automobiles talking about World War II. Like Professor Van Helsing chasing Dracula in the 1970s. One of the reasons this sort of thing kept happening was period pieces were expensive. With CGI that shouldn't be a problem today.

Ron M. said:

Just rewatched Basil Rathbone in Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon. Good film, but it doesn't seem right seeing Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in automobiles talking about World War II.

Since I used to watch the Basil Rathbone Holmes movies I have discovered superior versions such as the British series of adaptations starring Jeremy Brett. The biggest problem with the Rathbone movies is the doddering/stupid Dr. Watson. Watson was a very smart, very effective character. When they update his time period it just makes it worse.

The TV series House (a nod to Holmes) had a better version of the Holmes character than Rathbone. He was an anti-social genius with a drug problem, not the avuncular character in the Rathbone movies.

The Ronald Howard version was very good but seemed to have been made on a very small budget.

What's annoying about Rathbone's series is Moriarty keeps showing up, played by different actors. This was a one shot character, and the fact they couldn't get the same guy to play him from film to film should have discouraged them from using him, but it didn't. And doesn't he die every time the same way?

But you can't blame Rathbone or Nigel Bruce for the way they played the characters. The films were made during a time when most heroes acted like that, and their sidekicks were all stupid. You play the character the way you're told or they get somebody else. And series characters were afficted by what's now known as Flanderization. In the Charlie Chan movies, Number Two son was considerably dumber than Number One Son, and an even dumber second sidekick was tossed into the latter movies to try to turn them into comedies.

Wasn't the drug problem something added in years later? I haven't read that many of his stories but there's no hint of it in the story where he goes over the falls or the one where he turned up alive years later after fans harrassed Doyle into bringing him back. It's not in the Red Headed League either.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Ron M. said:

The Ronald Howard version was very good but seemed to have been made on a very small budget.

I haven't seen this series. Maybe some day.

What's annoying about Rathbone's series is Moriarty keeps showing up, played by different actors. This was a one shot character, and the fact they couldn't get the same guy to play him from film to film should have discouraged them from using him, but it didn't. And doesn't he die every time the same way?

This reminds me of the gag(?) in the James Bond movies when CIA agent Felix Leiter was in every movie and NEVER played by the same actor.

As for Moriarty, I like Alan Moore's unique way of disposing of him in League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

But you can't blame Rathbone or Nigel Bruce for the way they played the characters. The films were made during a time when most heroes acted like that, and their sidekicks were all stupid.

I'm sorry if it sounded like I was blaming Rathbone or Nigel Bruce. I just wish the characters were presented as originally intended.

Wasn't the drug problem something added in years later? I haven't read that many of his stories but there's no hint of it in the story where he goes over the falls or the one where he turned up alive years later after fans harrassed Doyle into bringing him back. It's not in the Red Headed League either.

In some of the stories (and their British TV adaptations) Holmes injects cocaine or morphine, which were not illegal then. I'm sorry I can't pinpoint the stories.

Watched Sasame-yuki (1983), Kon Ichikawa's adaptation of the novel The Makioka Sisters, by Junichiro Tanizaki.  An entertaining film, and not a bad adaptation, although Ichikawa went for something much closer to a happy ending than the novel had, which was fairly bleak.

Watched Sasame-yuki (1983)

Wait, remind me, which novel I've never read by a Japanese author I've never heard of is this an adaptation of?

The novel The Makioka Sisters, by Junichiro Tanizaki.

Okay, thanks.

 photo tongue.gif

I've heard The Makioka Sisters called the "Gone With the Wind of Japan". Since I've never read the latter (or seen the movie), I've no idea how apt a comparison that may be.

Tanizaki's novel revolves around four sisters, members of an Osaka mercantile family that has seen better days, in the period from 1938-1941, right before the "Old Japan" that their family represented got blown up real good.  Tanizaki started publishing it in 1943, but the militarists thought it was too "feminine", and it wasn't completely published until after the war.

The book has a much bleaker ending than the film - it may be that Ichikawa felt that Japanese audiences of 1983 wouldn't have gone for a story that was that dark.

In either case, I enjoyed both the book and the film. If you were going to read one of Tanizaki's novels, I'd recommend that one as a good one to look at.

I saw Hit!, an old (1973) Billy Dee Williams movie where he plays a federal agent for an unspecified agency (presumably the CIA), who returns home from an out-of-country assignment to find his 15-year-old daughter dead from a heroin overdose.

It was her first time, provided by her sketchy boyfriend. Dad collects said boyfriend, locates the dealer who sold him the stuff, and -- as the boyfriend drives -- starts pummeling the dealer. The dealer, pleading for his life, argues what good would it do to kill me? I'm the low man on the totem pole. This plaint inspires our fed to go all the way to the top. He recruits a crew of people who hate drug dealers as much as he does, and they go to France and wipe out the heads of the heroin cartel.

For a caper movie, it was was painfully slow -- it was two and a half hours and felt like six.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service