Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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ClarkKent_DC said:

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace. Another movie I've seen only in bits and pieces. This time around, I saw the second half, up to the end. Superman III left such a bad taste in my mouth I couldn't bring myself to go see it when it was out, and its own poor reputation did not help.

Watching it, I was appalled by how bad the special effects were. Even considering it was made in (*gulp*) 1987, the effects -- especially the green screen -- were markedly worse than they were in the first Christopher Reeve Superman.

I remember watching Superman IV in the theater and noticing that "outer space" behind Superman and Nuclear Man when they were fighting on the moon was a black curtain with holes poked in it for stars. Unbelievably bad production values.

Philip Portelli said:

Chris Pratt can print his own money now and Bryce Howard should be a contender for the lead of CAPTAIN MARVEL.

Haven't seen it yet. I've seen Bryce Dallas Howard several times and she's a solid actor. I heard that Chris Pratt is being considered to take over the role of Indiana Jones. Better than Shia LaBeouf.

ClarkKent_DC said:

I finally saw Last Tango in Paris. I felt the same way I did with Pulp Fiction: I didn't see it when it was out, and seeing it all these years later, I didn't get what the big deal was.

I saw the movie in 1972. Wasn't crazy about it.

The big deal in 1972 was that it was one of the movies released with an "X" rating (as was Midnight Cowboy and The Damned) and that it starred Marlon Brando and some butter. The Motion Picture Association did not rate them. All of the original ratings (G-General, M-Mature, and R-Restricted) allowed under-age people to attend without or with parents. The movie-makers self-rated the movies as "X." At the time this was respectable. The term "Unrated" which often appears today probably would have been better, in hind-sight. Everyone soon realized that the X-rating wasn't controlled by anyone and the rest is history.

Captain Comics said:

I remember watching Superman IV in the theater and noticing that "outer space" behind Superman and Nuclear Man when they were fighting on the moon was a black curtain with holes poked in it for stars. Unbelievably bad production values.

I remember bits of Superman III but the trauma of watching Superman IV apparently caused me brain damage. I KNOW I saw it but I remember absolutely nothing about it.

The mind sometimes forgets things it doesn't want to remember.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace. Another movie I've seen only in bits and pieces. This time around, I saw the second half, up to the end. Superman III left such a bad taste in my mouth I couldn't bring myself to go see it when it was out, and its own poor reputation did not help.

Watching it, I was appalled by how bad the special effects were. Even considering it was made in (*gulp*) 1987, the effects -- especially the green screen -- were markedly worse than they were in the first Christopher Reeve Superman.


Ron M. said:

Those movies weren't bad because of bad special effects. They were bad because they were bad movies.

True, but ... well, I've said this before and I might as well say it again: I've seen worse movies before then, and worse movies since then, but Superman III was the first movie that made me feel like I got robbed. That said, Superman III wasn't as outright shoddy as Superman IV: The Quest for Peace.

Captain Comics said:

I remember watching Superman IV in the theater and noticing that "outer space" behind Superman and Nuclear Man when they were fighting on the moon was a black curtain with holes poked in it for stars. Unbelievably bad production values.

Good grief, that's not Hollywood-level moviemaking. That's home-movie-level moviemaking. That's "hey, gang, let's put on a show!"-quality moviemaking.

The fourth movie was made by a different outfit, Cannon films rather than the Salkinds. Wikipedia's page on the film has interesting details.

Rewatching The Nutty Professor. Interesting that Jerry Lewis based the character Buddy Love on Dean Martin. So the movie is sort of an excuse to insult his ex-partner.

This past weekend saw the documentary The Wolfpack, about the six Angulo brothers, ages 11 to 18 in 2010, who, along with their mother and elder but mentally and physically handicapped sister, were mostly kept confined to their Manhattan apartment for much of their lives by their Peruvian Native American father (their mother was a white woman from the mid-west who met the father while traveling in Peru).  They were home-schooled, but mostly learned from watching movies -- an estimated 10,000 movies, which they eventually took to transcribing every line and re-enacting with their own finely crafted homemade props and costumes.  Fascinating film.  Also caught Love and Mercy, a bio-pic of Brian Wilson, co-founder and chief music writer for the Beach Boys, mainly focusing on his mental breakdown circa 1966-67 and his elder self of 20 years later, deeply depressed, in the thrall of his domineering psychiatrist who keeps him sedated with a steady diet of various pills but also starting a relationship with the woman who would eventually become his 2nd wife.  Some scenes were almost too painful for me to watch, especially those in which Brian so fearfully caves in to the browbeating of his extremely unethical doctor.  Brian Wilson is doing much better now at age 73 (he's two days younger than Paul McCartney -- both born in June 1942).  Both films deal with psycho-drama, and Brian had plenty of problems with his own father, but are also both ultimately uplifting, of people overcoming varying forms of adversity. 

I saw Avengers: The Age of Ultron yesterday.

Saw Terminator Genisys this weekend.  Not a great movie by any means, but if you're a fan of the Terminator mythology there are a lot of nice easter eggs and references to previous movies and even a nod or two to the TV series.

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I think the intent was to do something similar to what JJ Abrams did with Star Trek and branch off on a divergent timeline while still leaving past continuities intact. I found that aspect of the story to be interesting but as a movie intended to rekindle a franchise, it fell a little flat for me.

Saw Mad Max: Fury Road yesterday, and it is absolutely bonkers. Amazing action, all grounded in character, which is incredible considering there's so little dialogue for much of the movie. But we know what all the characters want, and we get so see how far they'll go to get it. Plus, lots of stunts and practical effects, sometimes augmented by CGI, but never supplanted by it. The best action movie I've seen in ages.

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