Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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“I recently watched the movie on BluRay, and found it just as powerful (and disturbing) as when it came out. The invented world is compelling, and the casual violence still retains its ability to shock.”

The juxtaposition of the violence and “Singin’ in the Rain” is both compelling and repulsive.

“I have read literally every book Burgess wrote except for A Clockwork Orange--I was just too put off by the polyglot Russian slang.”

Here’s a suggestion: try reading it aloud. When I read it for the first time (of many), I had a little trouble with the slang, too, despite having seen the movie multiple times and having no trouble with it there. When I grew tired of beating my bruised and kroovy rookers against unfair Bog in his heaven, I made up my razoodocks to read it aloud, then went off on my oddy knocky to enjoy some real horrorshow violence and dirty twenty-to-one.

Rookers = rukas (Russian for "hands")

Bog = Bog (Russian for God, rhymes with "rogue")

horrorshow = khorosho (Russian for "good")

The rest is probably Cockney rhyming slang or nursery-rhyme doggerel, which Burgess also used in Nadsat.

Kroovy = bloody

Oddy knocky = all alone or by myself

Razoodocks = minds

Don't know how he came up with those.

I used to be more fluent in Nadsat; my droog and I used to speak it in college.

The devil in Fantasia was Tchernobog, "black god", who was opposed in the old myths by Byelobog, "white god." Interesting Disney used Russian mythology. Not that well known.

The music for that segment was also Russian.

What's interesting is the Russians realized there wasn't much to Tchernobog and Byelobog, and pretty much replaced them with more conventional gods, like Purin the thunder god, who joined the Soviet Super Solders for awhile, where he seemed like the mythical Thor (as opposed to the clean shaven, much less violent Marvel Thor.)

In "A Hard Day's Night" the Beatles introduced the word "grotty" short for grotesque.

I’ve recently started watching the Hammer Studios “Frankenstein” movies (for the second time though in sequence). I’m quite familiar with the Universal Studios ones, but I’m not as familiar with these. So far I’ve watched the first four.

CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1957)
REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1958)
EVIL OF FRANKENSTEIN (1964)
FRANKENSTEIN CREATED WOMAN (1967)

Whereas the monster is the focus in the Universal series, Frankenstein himself is very much the focus in the Hammer series. “Revenge” is a direct sequel to “Curse” and details Frankenstein’s next experiment after creating the initial monster. “Evil” starts over with a new continuity, but “Frankenstein Created Woman” picks up (more or less) from “Revenge.”

Tracy came home Friday wanting to watch a Godzilla movie. (When she has a hard day at work, she gets relief vicariously through giant monsters stomping cities.) She chose “King Kong vs. Godzilla,” which I followed up the next day with “King Kong Escapes.” I would like to follow that up with “Frankenstein Conquers the World” (maybe after the Hammers… three to go).

Never seen any of the Hammer Frankensteins.

Evil of Frankenstein seems like Hammer's attempt at a more traditional Universal style Frankenstein flick.
Guess it didn't do particularly well since they returned to their own continuity with Frankenstein Created Woman.


Jeff of Earth-J said:

I’ve recently started watching the Hammer Studios “Frankenstein” movies (for the second time though in sequence). I’m quite familiar with the Universal Studios ones, but I’m not as familiar with these. So far I’ve watched the first four.

CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1957)
REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1958)
EVIL OF FRANKENSTEIN (1964)
FRANKENSTEIN CREATED WOMAN (1967)

Whereas the monster is the focus in the Universal series, Frankenstein himself is very much the focus in the Hammer series. “Revenge” is a direct sequel to “Curse” and details Frankenstein’s next experiment after creating the initial monster. “Evil” starts over with a new continuity, but “Frankenstein Created Woman” picks up (more or less) from “Revenge.”

Dang. More movies on the bucket list!

Evil of Frankenstein was made more traditional because Universal had lightened up by that point. That's also why the Monster looks a bit closer to Karloff. This was explained by horror host Svengoolie on Me-TV when he ran the picture. His comedy skits are very corny but he often gives very interesting information on the films he shows. Continuity was never very clear in those movies. Dr. Frankenstein dies in Curse.

The last two have David Prowse as two very different Monsters. Wonder if this had any influence on him getting Darth Vader, since the first Star Wars shows Peter Cushing bossing him around.

“Dr. Frankenstein dies in Curse.”

No, Frankenstein was led to the guillotine in Curse; Revenge begins with how he escaped it. Both Frankenstein and the creature die in Evil.

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