Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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...Not to mention that Nova magically has Taylor's dog tag in the second movie, which no one noticed in the first. Where was he hiding it?

I reviewed the franchise here in 2004, and noted anomalies along the way.

I rate them same as you with the series on a steady downward spiral. I loved Beneath when I saw it as a kid in the theatre although re-watches over the years have made the flaws more obvious. I don't believe I have ever been able to make it through any one of the remaining three films in one sitting.

I've never been able to reconcile how apes in a pre-industrial society could raise the rocket, repair it and then launch it. Much as I love the first two films, they lost me with that.


Jeff of Earth-J said:

 I always thought the first two delivered a nice one-two punch, and the others were somewhat lackluster in comparison. Regarding my favorites, I rank them from best to worst in release order. In other words…

1. POTA
2. Beneath
3. Escape
4. Conquest
5. Battle

< b>“I think I may have seen an episode or two of the tv show before seeing any of the movies…”

I think that was the case with me, too. It’s difficult to remember the exact chronology of events after so many years.

“I agree with your ranking.”

Thenk yew.

“In the movies they never explained how two chimps had a monkey for a baby.”

Was it a monkey? I hadn’t noticed. I should be getting to that one this weekend. If so, I’d chalk it up to artistic license.

“Not to mention the incomprehensible way that they ‘escaped.’”

That is a bit implausible. The book Conspiracy on the Planet of the Apes not only adapts the movie, but it also tells Landon’s story and fills in background details (Milo’s salvage of Taylor’s ship, the mutants’ observation of Ape City) as if they had been planned right from the start. It is also profusely illustrated by a variety of artists. I’ve read it only once, but plan to read it again soon. I’m saving it for last.

“Not to mention that Nova magically has Taylor's dog tag in the second movie, which no one noticed in the first.”

There was a flashback scene in which Taylor hung t around her neck.”

“Where was he hiding it?”

When Zira took it from him, he grabbed it back and put it in the “waistband” of his breechcloth.

“I reviewed the franchise here in 2004, and noted anomalies along the way.”

Oh, there are anomalies aplenty! I’ll no doubt be mentioning some of them along the way (I’ve already alluded to one). I will read your review of the franchise, but I may wait until later, after I’ve finished mine.

Watched Tokyo Zombie (2005), a comedy in which two laborers obsessed with martial arts get caught up in a zombie apocalypse.  Both funny and touching in parts,  Horror manga author Kazuo Umezu has a small part in this.

“In the movies they never explained how two chimps had a monkey for a baby.”

Was it a monkey? I hadn’t noticed. I should be getting to that one this weekend. If so, I’d chalk it up to artistic license.

Just re-watched the clip. It looks an awful lot like a baby chimp to me.

“Not to mention that Nova magically has Taylor's dog tag in the second movie, which no one noticed in the first.”

There was a flashback scene in which Taylor hung t around her neck.”

“Where was he hiding it?”

When Zira took it from him, he grabbed it back and put it in the “waistband” of his breechcloth.

 

Sure, but that scene flatly contradicts the first movie-- and that tag would have come in handy when the throat-damaged Taylor was trying to convince his keepers he was intelligent and his name was Taylor.

I'm pretty sure I watched all the POTA movies as a lad, but I don't remember much beyond the first one. I tend to only remember stuff I enjoy.

Is the first Star Trek movie the worst one? I remember it being awful, but I remember hating Star Trek V more. It may be that I forgave the first one more because it was the first one, and I was so grateful it was happening. But what I remember about V was how out of character everyone was, which heads into uncanny valley territory.

I do remember a great line from V: "Why does God need a spaceship?" It was funny, but then later I started thinking it on other occasions. Like when an athlete thanks God/Jesus for his team winning, I'd think "Why does God need to win a football game?" or "Why has God abandoned the other team?" It's amazing some variant of that line comes in handy.

Of course, POTA was never intended to be anything more than a standalone movie in the first place. Except for Fantastic Voyage, science fiction was definitely a “B” genre up until, well… Planet of the Apes and 2001: A Space Odyssey. And sequels? As I understand it, sequels at the time were thought of as nothing more than watered down rehashes of the original, and Beneath the Planet of the Apes was the first one to really make money. Charlton Heston was reluctant even to appear in it, and the end was purposefully designed to bring the story to a close. Everyone involved was surprised when it made money, and I think the plot holes such as those you mentioned and I have also pointed out only go to show the flying-by-the-seat-of-one’s-pants nature of the series.

I recently re-watched Star Trek: The Motion Picture and enjoyed it quite a bit. It's almost like watching a European science fiction film with the Star Trek characters tossed in. It's definitely better than Star Trek V.

Thanks, Tim!

Many moons ago, when late night television consisted of (a) The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and (b) everything else that nobody would watch because most people were watching The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, I saw all five of the Planet of the Apes movies. CBS Late Night specialized in showing cheesy science fiction movies, and had them on one week, in order, Monday through Friday. Even then, I knew not to think too hard about t he plot logic, or lack thereof. 

Only saw the first Star Trek movie, but I remember critics commenting that it seemed very strange that the odd numbered films were awful (I, III, IV), while the even numbered ones (II, IV) were good, almost as if they were making them that way on purpose.

I like the first Star Trek movie more than most of the sequels. But I've always felt like it's not really a Star Trek movie. It's heavily influenced by 2001 A Space Odyssey and makes almost no attempt to tap the continuity of the TV show. Additionally, it relies on two brand new characters to deliver most of the drama.  And it takes a more hard sci-fi approach than the "wagon train to the stars" concept Star Trek was based on.  I think Wrath of Khan is so well regarded because it addressed pretty much all of these complaints.

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