Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Amazing!

I've seen it as a kid and again as an adult. It really is one of the better drive-in SF flicks of that era.

STARCRASH (MST3K): This 1978 Star Wars rip-off stars David Hasselhoff and Christopher Plummer. However bad you think that sounds, multiply by a factor of 10. I almost didn’t need the jokes the movie itself is so very, very bad. From the opening scene of a spaceship passing overhead shot from below to actual light sabers, this move stunk from start to finish. My only question is how the old MST3K missed this one. All six of the new ones I’ve watched so far have been really good, laugh out loud funny.



Captain Comics said:

I haven't seen it either, and it's NOT on my DVR! SOB! I've wanted to see this since I was 10!

Did they not have some analogue to Creature Feature where you grew up? Or were you one of those kids who had friends and was outside playing with them when you should have been watching TV?

Caught Shield For Murder on TCM's Noir Alley showcase the other day; a good noir about a dirty cop (Edmond O'Brien) -- but a highlight was seeing Carolyn Jones in a non-Morticia Addams role as a platinum-blonde barfly he spends some time with. 

Losers!

The Baron said:



Captain Comics said:

I haven't seen it either, and it's NOT on my DVR! SOB! I've wanted to see this since I was 10!

Did they not have some analogue to Creature Feature where you grew up? Or were you one of those kids who had friends and was outside playing with them when you should have been watching TV?

I just watched the documentary Doomed: The Untold Story of Roger Corman's the Fantastic Four (2015). It's very detailed and takes you through the movie-making (on a shoestring) that was, unbeknownst to the actors, the director and the entire staff, simply an effort to retain the rights to the FF. Everyone involved appears in the documentary and great detail is provided.

It is pointed out that everyone was paid their agreed-upon salaries. It is also pointed out that a high profile project was expected to help everyone's careers and to provide future residuals, none of which came to be. It also helps to explain the poor special effects to those of us who have (illicitly) viewed the supposedly destroyed movie.

That sounds really interesting. I didn’t even know the documentary existied. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

CREEPSHOW: Having read Berni Wrightson’s Creepshow for the first time last weekend, I watched George Romero’s Creepshow for the second time ever last night. I remembered the meteor, crate and buried-in-the-sand stories quite well, but barely remembered the father’s day and cockroaches ones at all. My wife had bab memories of the cockroach story and did not, in fact, open her eyes during the worst pasts last night. I remember the film being light-hearted (IMDB describes it as a “comedy”), but I didn’t remember it being quite so silly. Then again, the EC anthologies it’s based on took a humorous approach to horror as well.

While watching, I made a close comparison to the graphic novel. It’s interesting to see them side-by-side, but overall I must say I prefer the illustrated version.

I'm sure I've said it before, but if you like EC or Creepshow and the like, you must watch Trick r Treat.

(R)

Just watched Shadow of the Thin Man. Even as old as this is -- and show so cheaply -- there are still some gems to be found. But you have to overlook the eye-rolling "Mammy" who is the Charles' servant.

Watched a chunk of It Came From Beneath the Sea last night, and will probably wrap it up this weekend. I'd seen the Harryhausen giant squid attack before, but never in the context of the whole movie. 

Hanging out with a few friends tonight, watched the last couple of episodes of Lucifer and ...the Mystery Science Theater 3000 showing of the, ahem, "classic" Danish giant monster film Reptilicus!   Been a while since I've seen a film that was soooo thoroughly and chessily bad, one clearly deserving of being mocked, with special effects that would have seemed obviously cheap if the film had been made in 1931 rather than 1961.  I can't quite understand why it didn't do for the Danish film industry what Godzilla did for Japan's.  Ah, well, it was certainly amusing, even if that wasn't the intent of the filmmakers.  And, heck, it also had a few very lovely Danish actresses -- of whom those who are still alive are in their 80s now.

Reptilicus was a blast! The only ep of the new MST3K we've seen so far.

Also, I finished watching It Came from Beneath the Sea last night. Harryhausen's effects are always fun, but the film also has an odd love triangle that's fun to watch. But aside from those three characters and one other guy, everyone else feels like an extra... there's never really much sense of danger for any of the principals.

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