Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 26903

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

We've seen how effective it can be with Michael Douglas (Henry Pym) in Ant-Man, Robert Downey Jr. (Tony Stark) in Captain America: Civil War along with the fore-mentioned Kurt Russell.

And who could forget "skinny" Chris Evans in Captain America The First Avenger!

Speaking for myself, I liked Escape from New York because, in no particular order:

1) Kurt Russell playing an antihero was new at the time

2) Lee Van Cleef was enjoyable to me in the spaghetti westerns and as one of the bad guys in the great High Noon

3) Ernest Borgnine (the cabbie) was always fun to watch

4) Adrienne Barbeau (at the time Mrs Carpenter) was also always fun to watch

5) Donald Pleasence playing Donald Pleasence, also fun

6) Isaac Hayes in an early acting role

7) John Carpenter directed a lot of movies that give me a warm and fuzzy feeling, to one degree or another

Philip Portelli said:

We've seen how effective it can be with Michael Douglas (Henry Pym) in Ant-Man, Robert Downey Jr. (Tony Stark) in Captain America: Civil War along with the fore-mentioned Kurt Russell.

And who could forget "skinny" Chris Evans in Captain America The First Avenger!

Not to mention Gal Godot in Wonder Woman. She was pregnant while filming, but Diana wasn't on screen.

At least they didn't have her charge into battle carrying a laundry basket or something! 

ClarkKent_DC said:

Philip Portelli said:

We've seen how effective it can be with Michael Douglas (Henry Pym) in Ant-Man, Robert Downey Jr. (Tony Stark) in Captain America: Civil War along with the fore-mentioned Kurt Russell.

And who could forget "skinny" Chris Evans in Captain America The First Avenger!

Not to mention Gal Godot in Wonder Woman. She was pregnant while filming, but Diana wasn't on screen.



Captain Comics said:

I was thinking of Flagg! when I wrote that, Jeff -- I hadn't remembered, though, that Chaykin had given it a name. Tromplography, eh? It would be awesome if "beauty work" adopted that nomenclature!


Contemporaneously (publishing-wise), over in Badger, Ham the weather wizard, presumably as a protest against the colorization of old films, planned to resurrect dead movie stars to reshoot their classic films in color.

Captain Comics said:

I was thinking of Flagg! when I wrote that, Jeff -- I hadn't remembered, though, that Chaykin had given it a name. Tromplography, eh? It would be awesome if "beauty work" adopted that nomenclature!


Jeff of Earth-J said:

Contemporaneously (publishing-wise), over in Badger, Ham the weather wizard, presumably as a protest against the colorization of old films, planned to resurrect dead movie stars to reshoot their classic films in color.

Remember the flap over putting dead movie stars in TV commercials

Saw a couple of older movies this past week, bookending Wonder Woman (which I really enjoyed, though I think the final fight could have been better). 

First up was Cool Hand Luke, with Paul Newman as a prisoner on a Florida chain gang, and George Kennedy as his rival (who becomes his right-hand man). Quite a movie, though it sure doesn't want us to miss the Christ imagery. But I doubt even Jesus could eat 50 hard boiled eggs in an hour.

Then I watched Jacques Tati's Mr. Hulot's Holiday, a light comedy in which an oaf takes a vacation, unwittingly causing both trouble and delight for those around him. It's a sweet movie, and Roger Ebert's review suggests that it's one whose pleasures increase with every re-watch, as it's like going back to the same beach house and finding out that nothing had changed since last year. 

I saw Mr. Hulot's Holiday years ago as part of a double bill at a revival house. IIRC, it is a silent color movie made in France. It's very enjoyable. 

I love Cool Hand Luke. That is one of my all-time favorite movies.

If you haven't seen The Hustler, you should see that, too.

Actually, Richard, it's a black and white movie with sound. But it *feels* like a silent movie, in the way the gags are structured and in that the dialogue is minimal and intentionally somewhat banal. It doesn't move the plot forward (there's really no plot), its just part of setting the scene. Maybe there's a colorized version, but the original was in black and white. It was filmed in the 50s, but Tati tinkered with the editing in the 60s and again in 1972 -- a restored version of which is what TCM screened this weekend. 

And yeah, Jeff, Cool Hand Luke is a real treat! I haven't seen The Hustler yet, but I'm a Newman fan, so it's definitely on my list.   

I don’t care if it rains or freezes
Long as I got my plastic Jesus
Sittin’ on the dashboard of my car

Goin’ 90 but I ain’t scary
Long as I got the Virgin Mary
Take her with you when you travel far

Back to Reptilicus, I just saw clips from it in an episode of Green Acres, "Instant Family," episode 28 of season 3.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2017   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service