Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Incidentally, It Follows got a shout-out on Talking Preacher recently. When the showrunner was asked why the Saint of Killers didn't commandeer a vehicle at any point, he said that there was something unsettling about someone walking inexorably toward you to do something terrible. "Like in a dream or 'It Follows'," he said, or something like that. Come to think of it, it might have been the actor who said that. Well, somebody did.

The unstoppable threat stalking on foot reminds me of other things before It Follows, which of course I can't pinpoint.

Of course, the Saint of Killers may not know how to drive. He's from the 1870s. As long as Jesse drives a car or other ground transportation he'll just keep coming.

We just watched A Simple Plan (1998), starring Bill Paxton, Billy Bob Thornton and Bridget Fonda. It has a definite Fargo vibe and was directed by Sam Raimi before he did the first Spider-Man movie.

Haven't gotten to The Loved Ones yet but last night I watched:

Ouija: Origin of Evil (2016)

Apparently this is a sequel/prequel to Ouija (2014) which I never watched because I heard it was awful.  Origin of Evil is a serviceable follow up that makes use of the haunted house/possession blueprint. As it is a prequel, it takes place in the late 60s. IIRC, The Conjuring also used this same trick of a sequel that was set in the 60s or 70s rather than the present day, but I digress. Ouija: Origin of Evil isn't a classic, but it's well done with some good performances, high production values and a few genuinely creepy moments. I felt like it was worth my time even though I had that "been here before" feeling throughout.

What happened to Bridget Fonda? She was in a couple of movies in the '80s I'd call "big" in that they there were a lot of TV commercials (and comic book ads). Single White Female jumps to mind. I thought she was destined for stardom, but then she vanished.

Of course, I might be mixing her up some other starlets of the time, thinking she was in more movies than she was.

Richard Willis said:

We just watched A Simple Plan (1998), starring Bill Paxton, Billy Bob Thornton and Bridget Fonda. It has a definite Fargo vibe and was directed by Sam Raimi before he did the first Spider-Man movie.

Captain Comics said:

What happened to Bridget Fonda? She was in a couple of movies in the '80s I'd call "big" in that they there were a lot of TV commercials (and comic book ads). Single White Female jumps to mind. I thought she was destined for stardom, but then she vanished.

Of course, I might be mixing her up some other starlets of the time, thinking she was in more movies than she was.

According to IMDB, Bridget Fonda last made a movie in 2002. Wikipedia says she's retired, and notes that in 2003, she was in a car crash, got engaged, and got married. 

You'd probably have to say that Bridget Fonda is a character actor, even though a pretty one. I note that in 2003 she married Danny Elfman, who continues to have a great career in movie and television scores. Heck, he composed the theme for The Simpsons, which I imagine has brought in a lot of money.

By the time she recovered from her car accident they had a child and as a woman in the movie industry roles were probably getting harder to come by at the advanced age of 40.

I took my kids to see Spiderman: Homecoming this morning. Without any spoilers, what you've heard or read about the film is accurate. Over all an enjoyable film that gives us a Spiderman we can all appreciate. My overly skeptical eldest was thoroughly satisfied with Tom Holland's portrayal, going so far as to comment that he took the best elements of Toby Maguire and Andrew Garfield and made them his own. I feared that Tony Stark/Robert Downey would steal the show (in a roundabout way, Stark does) but rest assured, this movie is Spiderman, not Marvel Team Up. I do have to admit that it feels odd to see Peter Parker as young as he is here; in the comics he hasn't been in high school since I was in grade school, but I like that his youth gives the character plenty of room to grow, as well as franchise staying power (although it seems the introduction of Miles Morales is pre-ordained). All in all I give it 4 out of 5 stars. Oh yeah, if you stay for the end sequence, you may find yourself happily disappointed. Trust me on that.

Agreed,John! Well said!

The Loved Ones (2009)

Ok, I got a chance to watch this and I can see why it has a cult following. This is an Australian low budget horror film from Sean Byrne, who also directed The Devil's Candy, which I posted about above.  The production values here are a bit lower as you might expect but there is a lot to like. The film is influenced a bit by torture oriented movies like Hostel but turns that concept on it's head.  So we do get some pretty graphic scenes that are disturbing and difficult to watch but the movie is really more about family dysfunction, depression, rejection, loss, alienation, and even recovery.  I'd say this is one of those horror movies that transcends genre to a certain degree and for that reason I would recommend it along with the director's follow up, The Devil's Candy.

Kong:Skull Island (2017)

Did someone already post on this?  I found it to be entertaining but a little nonsensical. Great production values, stylistic choices, music and effects, but some dumb plot contrivances. (Why are all those helicopters flying right up next to Kong where he can swat them?) I especially liked the fact that the female lead was not just the helpless object of Kong's affection. If Peter Jackson's version was an homage to the 1930's era of the original film, Skull Island is a total tribute to the 70s monster movies I grew up on.  Apparently, this takes place in the same universe as the 2014 Godzilla film. There's a Marvel style post credit sequence that teases a potential meeting between Kong and Godzilla.  Overall I  would recommend this to anyone who likes monster movies.

Did someone already post on this?

I did. Here's what I had to say (back on april 17):


"KONG: SKULL ISLAND: Finally got around to seeing this at the theater over the weekend. I had intended to re-watch the Jack Black version first, but oh well. That is ONE… BIG… APE! After the original and two remakes, I’m glad they decided to take a different direction. There’s no taking this ape back to New York City, baby! I hear next in the works is a match-up between King Kong and the King of the Monsters. I’m looking forward to it, but it will be a tough decision who to root for."

Speaking of the music, I ordered the soundtrack on CD sight unseen. Turns out I should have looked a little closer than not at all. Turns out the CD is of the original score, not the collection of '70s songs I was hoping for. This could have been the Guardians of the Galaxy "Awesome Mix" done right (non-campy, I mean).

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