Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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I'm glad you guys could enjoy the experience while you could.

From Vulture: "Disney Is Quietly Placing Classic Fox Movies Into Its Vault, and That's Worrying"

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Y’know how I said Princess Bride was not really my kind of movie? Cat Women of the Moon is my kind of movie!

The IMDB tells me Victor Jory had a role! I'm fond of spotting him in things. He was a leading man in the 1930s and played many villains in B-movies later. As it happens I watched MacKennna's Gold the other day, and was surprised to learn he was the narrator.

Fire Maidens from Outer Space (1956), Queen of Outer Space (1958), Missile to the Moon (1958), - are there other 1950s movies with that planet of women premise? Bees in Paradise (1944) is a dire British comedy with a similar plot where the women inhabit an island.

ClarkKent_DC said:

I'm glad you guys could enjoy the experience while you could.

From Vulture: "Disney Is Quietly Placing Classic Fox Movies Into Its Vault, and That's Worrying"

The "Disney Vault" policy has always been slightly annoying but this is more so.

It's hard to believe that they will do special theatrical releases of a multitude of films one at a time as they have with their classic animated films. It's more likely, IMO, that they will show up as streaming only.

As for (intentionally) non-profit theaters, how many cities have them? Outdoor screenings I have seen promoted generally seem to be G-rated films aimed at the youngest children, for fear someone would object to the content.

Richard Willis said:

The "Disney Vault" policy has always been slightly annoying but this is more so.

It's hard to believe that they will do special theatrical releases of a multitude of films one at a time as they have with their classic animated films. It's more likely, IMO, that they will show up as streaming only.

As for (intentionally) non-profit theaters, how many cities have them? Outdoor screenings I have seen promoted generally seem to be G-rated films aimed at the youngest children, for fear someone would object to the content.

I wouldn't know how many cities have non-profit theaters, and I think that's the wrong question anyway. The question is, why are these films no longer available to these theaters when they were before? They aren't losing anything. I know from experience (having put on film screenings at my church) that Disney charges higher license fees than other film studios for showing films in settings other than theaters (churches, fundraisers, libraries, classrooms, prisons, outdoor screenings, etc.) 

It's not a question of losing money; between Disney and all its subsidiaries, it grabbed 40 percent of the total box office take so far this year, with three months left to go. I have to think whatever money Fox (and now Disney) might get from those non-profit theaters is a rounding error on the balance sheet, but Fox didn't think it hurt anything to make those films available.

As for outdoor screenings, I've seen PG and PG-13 films available, if only because most films made today fall into those categories. 

Here's another article on the problem, from Quartz: "Small Theater Chains Worry a Mid-Century Rule Is All That Stands Between Them and Extinction"

The comment about DOJ opposing consent decrees may or may not be relevant. The decrees that were opposed were related to pre-clearance of election law changes. It's a toss-up whether or not they would care as much about the 1938 movie studios consent decree.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Here's another article on the problem, from Quartz: "Small Theater Chains Worry a Mid-Century Rule Is All That Stands Between Them and Extinction"



Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

The movie Fail Safe came out a year later. As Dennis Miller & Martin Short mentioned in the conversation segment TCM showed afterward, it's rare that a satire comes out before the straight dramatization... and has details in it that seem more accurate. 

I feel the same way about Excalibur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Holy Grail came out first, then when I watching Excalibur years later I had this weird sense of deja vu. Especially the scene with the knights hanging in the trees, which was in both movies. As you say, the satire came out before the drama.

Oh, wow -- I never had a sense of the timing of those movies, since I saw them both on video or cable after their initial release. 

I had a quick look at parts of Excalibur the other day, and the scene where Lancelot fights himself reminded me of Luke's vision fight with Vader in The Empire Strikes Back (where he cuts off Vader's head, then sees his own face). The Star Wars film came out the previous year, so I think it's not a coincidence.

Wah! Don't pick on Excalibur. It's one of my favorite movies.(tongue in cheek imoji)

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

I still have never watched the (toned-down, as I understand it) film of Gone Girl, though I read the novel. Imagine a vaguely satiric mystery, half of which is written by a radical feminist and half of which is written by an MRA, and you have the novel. I preferred her earlier Dark Places, at least until she got to the solution. I found myself hoping fervently the solution wasn't going to be what it appeared like it was going to be, and then... Yep, that's the solution. I saw the movie of DP, but they rather made a hash of it, despite a strong cast.

She doesn't really write about likeable people.

Captain Comics said:

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

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