Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Oh, wow -- I never had a sense of the timing of those movies, since I saw them both on video or cable after their initial release. 

I had a quick look at parts of Excalibur the other day, and the scene where Lancelot fights himself reminded me of Luke's vision fight with Vader in The Empire Strikes Back (where he cuts off Vader's head, then sees his own face). The Star Wars film came out the previous year, so I think it's not a coincidence.

Wah! Don't pick on Excalibur. It's one of my favorite movies.(tongue in cheek imoji)

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

I still have never watched the (toned-down, as I understand it) film of Gone Girl, though I read the novel. Imagine a vaguely satiric mystery, half of which is written by a radical feminist and half of which is written by an MRA, and you have the novel. I preferred her earlier Dark Places, at least until she got to the solution. I found myself hoping fervently the solution wasn't going to be what it appeared like it was going to be, and then... Yep, that's the solution. I saw the movie of DP, but they rather made a hash of it, despite a strong cast.

She doesn't really write about likeable people.

Captain Comics said:

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

I think I got about 15-20 minutes into that movie until I fell asleep. I never got back to it.

Your feelings of the characters mirrors how I felt about the characters of The Big Lebowski.

Captain Comics said:

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

Go figure. The Big Lebowski is one of my favorite movies.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

I think I got about 15-20 minutes into that movie until I fell asleep. I never got back to it.

Your feelings of the characters mirrors how I felt about the characters of The Big Lebowski.

Captain Comics said:

I'm halfway through Gone Girl. It's been several days and I haven't raced back to see the second half, so consider that a review. Unless, of course, the second half blows me away. So far, though, I don't like any of these people and I hope they all die.

We saw the movie Gone Girl. Didn't hate it, but it doesn't lend itself to multiple viewings.

Tracy and I both read Gone Girl and both loved it. We bought the DVD when it was first released, but still haven't even taken it out of the shrinkwrap.this discussion doesn't exactly make me eager to do so.

I saw Gone Girl in the theater. Liked it a lot, but doubt I'll see it again for a while. I don't rewatch much.

Recently I've watched:

Framing John Delorean - A documentary on John Delorean that includes re-enactments with Alec Baldwin playing Delorean. The star of the film though was definitely, John's son Zach. I knew the basics of what happened, but this goes into a lot more detail of the man and his company.

The Conversation - Gene Hackman is great as a paranoid surveillance expert who is hired to spy on a couple by a director of a large corporation. I forget how cute Cindy Williams was back then, and there is also a Harrison Ford sighting. A little too long, but a great payoff.

Bad Company - Like The Conversation, this is a movie from the 70s, and it stars Jeff Bridges and Barry Brown who are part of a group of youths who are dodging the Civil War. They decide to head West and try to make their fortune, and not fight in the war. From that adventure awaits. In addition to Jeff Bridges this also has David Huddleston who played The Big Lebowski in The Big Lebowski, so I feel like I've come full circle.I really liked this one too.

The sequences involving the interpretation of the tape in The Conversation were modelled after similar scenes involving the interpretation of photographs in Blowup (1966), a Michelangelo Antonini film. When I saw it as a young adult I found those scenes hypnotic. It's a famous film, but for me the rest of it had that art-house bore quality. 

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