Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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...Anal rententive ( Self-depreciation , Cmdr. ) correction...I believe Ted Turner's company , OR , Time-Warner , after Turner sold out to it , owns the flick GWTW .

  I have not had time to fully read your post , Cmdr. , I mentioned GWTW in my " Spoilers " thread and gave it a line of its own when , Thanksgiving last year , I saw it on AMC again...Intending to just see George Reeves' scene at the beginning but getting sucked back in !!!!!!!!!

Commander Benson said:

Henry R. Kujawa said:

 

I can honestly say that in my entire life, I have NEVER yet walked out on any movie . . . .

 

 

I did, once.

 

My mother was a huge Clark Gable fan.  Gable and singer Vaughn Monroe were the only two performers I ever saw make her act like a squealing, trembling teen-age girl.  Among my earliest memories are those of her extolling at length about what a great film Gone with the Wind was.  There wasn't a chance for me to see it, though.  The movie hadn't been re-released for several years.  And, in those early days of television, a virtual Iron Curtain existed between the two media.  Cinema studios weren't about to put their huge money-making epics on the small screen, where people could watch them for free, for crying out loud.

 

Then, in 1967, MGM re-released Gone with the Wind in an 70 mm. version with Stereophonic sound.  The studio launched a fresh publicity campaign, touting the sharper detail of the picture and the higher sound quality.

 

I grew up in northern Ohio, and at the time, I lived in Elyria.  Elyria had only two movie theatres.  There was the Capitol, which showed the important films, the spectacles, the A-listers, like Ben Hur and Judgment at Nuremberg.  And then there was the Lake Theatre, which ran everything from the B-to-Z lists, where, for a dime, a kid could take in such classics as The Three Stooges Meet Hercules and Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster.

 

Guess which house was showing Gone with the Wind back in '67?

 

The Capitol itself befit the image of a theatre that featured grand, distinguished films.  You don't see moviehouses like the Capitol, anymore.  An arched proscenium, flanked by heavy velvet drapes; detailed filigree on the moulding; a mezzanine and box seating.

 

Since I had heard Mom talk so much about Gone with the Wind, I decided to see for myself was all the ballyhoo was about.  Saturday afternoon, I went downtown and plunked down one of my hard-earned quarters---yes, the admission charge for Gone with the Wind was a whole twenty-five cents, as befit the re-release of such a classic work of cinema---and found a comfortable seat.

 

I really didn't know what to expect.  A tale set against the fall of the antebellum South didn't rank very high on the radar of a kid who spent every Sunday morning watching re-runs of Bowery Boys shorts on television.  But the movie got my attention fast with opening scene which featured Vivian Leigh, Fred Crane, and---George Reeves!  There was more than one youngster's muffled cry of "It's Superman!" emanating from the audience.  I was sure hooked.  Much of the undertone of the film was lost for me, since I was spending most of my time watching for Reeves's scenes (which were scant and over by the first half-hour).

 

However, the superficial plot was interesting enough.  At least, I paid sufficient attention to follow along with what was going on.  But, perhaps, if I'd been keeping track of the character sub-plots, I might not have done what I did.

 

Those of you familiar with the film of course remember the spectacular burning of Atlanta scene in which Rhett Butler helps Scarlett, her sister, and her sister's newborn baby escape the city.  Then, Butler leaves to join the Confederates in their last, doomed stand, leaving Scarlet, Melanie, and the baby to make their difficult odessey back to their home, Tara.

 

They arrive to find their land devastated and barren, but the house, Tara, itself, still stands.  Having gone for days with no food, Scarlett sees a single rancid turnip left in the ground.  She plucks it out of the earth and eats it voraciously, though she winds up spitting most of it out.

 

That point marks a turning point in her character.  No longer a daughter of the South as spoilt as the turnip, she finds resolve and determines to restore herself to wealth and privilege.  She stands before the ruins of Tara and swears forth:

 

. . . I'm going to live through this and when it's all over, I'll never be hungry, again!  No, nor any of my folk.  If I have to lie, steal, cheat, or kill!  As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry, again!

 

And then the screen went black.

 

Now understand, I was a youngster.  I had never heard of a film having an intermission.  The Three Stooges and Ghidorah didn't have intermissions.  Nothing on the screen even said, "Intermission".  All I knew was the people in the house were getting out of their seats and walking out.  I didn't realise they were just heading back to the concession stand to get more popcorn or to the rest rooms to make a head call.

 

I just saw them leaving and figured the movie was over.  So I left, too. 

 

I went home.

 

Not a bad ending, I thought.  I was savvy enough to have figured out that it was about how this selfish brat, Scarlett O'Hara, had grown up.  When I got home, I didn't tell my mother that I had gone to see it.  I thought it had been an O.K. movie, but nothing to brag about, and I knew Mom would be disappointed that I didn't think it was the Greatest Movie of All Time.

 

Hence, I never found out that I had seen only half the movie.  Not until 1976 when, for the first time, it debuted on television.  In two parts, over two successive nights, on NBC.  Why did NBC need two hours both nights to air it, I asked.  Friends and my mother told me.

 

You mean there's more?, I said.

 

 

Post script. 

 

The Good Mrs. Benson is a Civil-War buff and a huge fan of Gone with the Wind.  Had my mother lived, no doubt they would still be gabbing over the picture.   Worse, I made the mistake of telling the GMB the above story.  Everytime she thinks of it, when she can finally stop laughing, she accuses me of having faked my membership in MENSA.

 

In 1998, MGM released Gone with the Wind yet again.  It was the first time since I had met and married the GMB.  She insisted that we go see it.  Despite the fact that she had it on video tape and we could see it at home whenever we wanted, without the expense of paying for it.  But, as the rest of you married guys know, logic plays no part when the wife wants to do something like this.  So we went to the local theatre (which, incidentally, looked nothing like the Capitol).

 

When the film got to a familiar spot to me . . . .

 

". . . As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry, again!" swears Scarlett.

 

My wife put her hand on my arm.

 

"Don't even think it," she said.


Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Anal rententive ( Self-depreciation , Cmdr. ) correction...I believe Ted Turner's company , OR , Time-Warner , after Turner sold out to it , owns the flick GWTW .

 

 

More like an addition.  The references to MGM and Gone with the Wind in my story covered 1967 through 1976 (and by implication, back to 1939).  During this time, MGM did, indeed, own Gone with the Wind.  MGM authorised the theatre re-releases of the film and its television debut in 1976, on NBC and on HBO.

 

Ted Turner didn't acquire the complete rights to Gone with the Wind until 1987.  When his company, the Turner Broadcasting System, purchased the MGM library in 1986, it received only the theatre distribution rights for Gone with the Wind, at the time.  A previous arrangement between MGM and CBS had contracted the television rights to the film.

 

In August, 1987, Turner purchased the television rights to Gone with the Wind back from CBS.  With these rights in hand, Turner jumped into cable television with Turner Network Television (TNT).  TNT was launched on 03 October 1988 with a showing of Gone with the Wind.

 

 

Over the years, I have often "walked in" on the middle of a movie on TV, if I didn't know it was running, and just happened to turn it on, they kept watching to the end.

It's rare I've ever "walked out" of a movie ON TV.

But I have, at least once...  BEN-HUR.  Good God almighty, I HATE that film.  And generally, I LIKE films set in Biblical times.  But not this hateful thing.

I saw it once-- I forget if it was one of the networks, or AMC or something. Now, everybody remembers "the charriot race".  RIGHT.  But what got me was, the set-up for the entire film made no damn sense at all.  Charlton Heston's BEST FRIEND comes to visit... something happens... and suddenly, his LIFE-LONG, BEST FRIEND has his entire family arrested, throws them all into the dankest dungeon of a prison he can find, while he condemns Heston to being a slave on a Roman galley. I mean... even in "Roman Empire" terms, whatever allegedly caused this, this was really over-doing it, wasn't it?

Some years back, I happened across the film, by accident, on TCM.  I came in at the point where Heston was already chained to those oars.  I watched as the ship was caught in a storm, he escaped, saving the captain's life in the process, and being granted his freedom in return.  The next huge section of the story was actually pretty fascinating, as Heston slowly rose in his status in life, while, the whole time, plotting to get REVENGE on the MISERABLE BASTARD who destroyed his family. I kept watching right up until the end of the chariot race, when that BASTARD got what was coming to him. But when, just before that BASTARD died the painful death he so richly deserved, he had to get one last vicious stab in, that's when I had to shut the damned film off.  I mean, look at this guy.  He did wrong. He did more wrong than it is almost conceiveble to believe of someone doing wrong. And here he is, about to DIE, painfully, and what does he do?  He tells Heston his family is STILL alive, and, he's NEVER, EVER going to find them or see them again!!

There's something really, really SICK going on there.

I remember the last half-hour of the film-- or was it more like last 45 minutes??-- AFTER the chariot race.  It was even more depressing than the rest of the film put together.  Until the last 2 minutes.  THIS is supposed to be an "Easter" film?  Who the HELL is kidding who here???

Now... imagine my total surprise when, at some point, I fouind out TCM was going to run the ORIGINAL version of the film-- the SILENT version-- as part of their Sunday night silent film schedule.  Out of perverse curiosity-- I decided to sit thru it.  And I was FLOORED.  Mainly because of 2 things.  First-- the set-up, in the original, MADE SENSE. (I swear, it DIDN'T in the remake.)  Second, the structure of the film was altered drastically.  The ending-- perhaps I should say, the "epilogue"-- instead of dragging on painfully for 45 minutes, ended before it ever really got that bad. Ben-Hur never saw his family-- until AFTER they were cured of the incurable disease they'd picked up in that dungeon. So you had the drama, WITHOUT the misery. Wow.

Once again, someone took a FANTASTIC silent film, and remade it as a piece of flashy, big-budget DRECK. And most people will never know it, because who watches silents anymore?

You know, it was slowly occuring to me over the last 15 years or so that for an actor whose work I admired when I was young, Charlton Heston sure appeared in a lot of REALLY DOWNBEAT, MISERABLE movies with BAD endings. (Ever notice?)

We just saw The Birds in the theater a few nights ago, and it was a damned effective scare machine -- much more so than on tv. Since then, when riding my bike around town, I've seen a few of those creatures flapping happily through the sky, and I've given them the side-eye, waiting for them to turn on me.

By the way, the reason we could see The Birds on a big screen was through the digital simulcast that Fathom Events does -- in this case a partnership with Turner Classic Movies. On the website, it looks like several more are scheduled -- ET, a Frankenstein/Bride Of double feature, and To Kill a Mockingbird... as well as an unrelated screening of Lawrence of Arabia. Not a dud in the bunch! 

..." In 1998 , MGM released Gone With The Wind yet again " .

  I'm afraid , Cmdr. , I stay out of the brig this time , as I am RIGHT !!!!!!!!!

  I have wondered , actually , if Turner will go for a 75-anniversary reish in 2013...At the time of 1998's , I saw an episode of Tom Snyder's then-CBS latelate-night show in which he interviewed Olivia DeHaviland(Sp??) in conjunction with it .

  BTW as well , in your comment about the 70MM 60s reissue , I am sure you were just reflecting/mentioning the PR of the time...I believe that reish is considered an inferior one ( And , I believe , is likely the version I saw in a theater in Bedford , NY , about 1973 with my father . )for..." making " a 70MM film out of a film that was , in fact , made in the old-style Hollywood , pre-50s boom , nearly square " Academy ratio " ( right phrase ?? ) screen proportions meant blowing up the part , in the center of the screen , that would approximate 70MM dimensions and then then CHOPPING OFF the images at the part of the screen that did not fit the straightjacket of the pseudo-70 - " windowboxing " , as opposed to " letterboxing " , I think it can be called ??? Were there actual multi-tracksof the sound made in '38 that could be remixed into " true " stereo of some sort of would that version have been simply a " stereo effect/fake stereo " such as many 1960s/70s record companies damaged mono recordings with ?????

Commander Benson said:


Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Anal rententive ( Self-depreciation , Cmdr. ) correction...I believe Ted Turner's company , OR , Time-Warner , after Turner sold out to it , owns the flick GWTW .

 

 

More like an addition.  The references to MGM and Gone with the Wind in my story covered 1967 through 1976 (and by implication, back to 1939).  During this time, MGM did, indeed, own Gone with the Wind.  MGM authorised the theatre re-releases of the film and its television debut in 1976, on NBC and on HBO.

 

Ted Turner didn't acquire the complete rights to Gone with the Wind until 1987.  When his company, the Turner Broadcasting System, purchased the MGM library in 1986, it received only the theatre distribution rights for Gone with the Wind, at the time.  A previous arrangement between MGM and CBS had contracted the television rights to the film.

 

In August, 1987, Turner purchased the television rights to Gone with the Wind back from CBS.  With these rights in hand, Turner jumped into cable television with Turner Network Television (TNT).  TNT was launched on 03 October 1988 with a showing of Gone with the Wind.

 

 

You're remembering right, at least in the case of the first one we see. It's a horrific scene involving a toilet. I watched some of the extra material, and in the interview with King he says he was trying to do for toilets what Psycho did for showers. Safer to just stay out of the bathroom, I guess :)

Robin Olsen said:

"I, DUDITZ!". Yeah, I remember DREAMCATCHER. Maybe you didn't hear much about the movie because (SPOILER ALERT!) the monster came out of people's butts, ain't that how it went, or am I remembering that wrong? I'm pretty jaded, but even I thought that was just a little icky, even for a monster movie. I admit I'd be pretty scared if a monster came out of MY butt -

Emerkieht Davyjack:

"a " stereo effect/fake stereo " such as many 1960s/70s record companies damaged mono recordings with"

AUGH!  I'm still putting up with Rolling Stones LPs that was done to.  (Fortunately, I was able to replace the early Moody Blues stuff with crystal-clear pristene mono).

Oddly enough, Warner Bros. put out a Roy Wood album, ON THE ROAD AGAIN, in 1979, in FAKE STEREO.  Why would they have done that, at such a late date?  Took me years before I realized it-- it was when I played a tape copy in my CAR that I realized something was really wrong with the "stereo" mix.  And it hit me, NO WONDER that album always hurt my ears!!  Since then, thanks to my computer and sound editor program, I was able to transfer the vinyl to CD, and generate MONO tracks in the process.  Sounds MUCH better than the "real thing" now.

...Haaaaaaah , someone else (in the States) likes Roy Wood !

  Henry , we really may BE " brothers from another mother " :-) !!!!!

Henry R. Kujawa said:

Emerkieht Davyjack:

"a " stereo effect/fake stereo " such as many 1960s/70s record companies damaged mono recordings with"

AUGH!  I'm still putting up with Rolling Stones LPs that was done to.  (Fortunately, I was able to replace the early Moody Blues stuff with crystal-clear pristene mono).

Oddly enough, Warner Bros. put out a Roy Wood album, ON THE ROAD AGAIN, in 1979, in FAKE STEREO.  Why would they have done that, at such a late date?  Took me years before I realized it-- it was when I played a tape copy in my CAR that I realized something was really wrong with the "stereo" mix.  And it hit me, NO WONDER that album always hurt my ears!!  Since then, thanks to my computer and sound editor program, I was able to transfer the vinyl to CD, and generate MONO tracks in the process.  Sounds MUCH better than the "real thing" now.


Emerkeith Davyjack said:

..." In 1998 , MGM released Gone With The Wind yet again " .

  I'm afraid , Cmdr. , I stay out of the brig this time , as I am RIGHT !!!!!!!!!

 

Yes, sir, I'm afraid you did get me there. When I checked my post, I missed that line.  Mea culpa.

 

Actually, the 1998 re-release of Gone with the Wind was by New Line Cinema, which was a subsidiary of Time Warner.  And since the Turner Broadcasting System merged with Time-Warner in 1996, it's all part of the same package---a package that didn't include MGM.

 

Thanks for keeping me straight on that.

 

 

...Thank you Cmdr. , I enjoyed the interiem knowledge about how in baeame Ted Terrific's in fits and starts...I enjoy " biz " stuff like that...More on this later...Including Margaret Mitchell's connection to Dave Sim ( NO , it's not " Dave's mum liked GWTW too !!! " !!! ) !

  Did your mom and your better half ever get to tell each other the story of your intermission boo-boo ??????? And go " MEN !!! " ??:-)

  What was the normal price for a matinee seen by a person your age at the GWTW-displaying theater , then , if yours was extra-large ???????

Emerkeith Davyjack:

"...Haaaaaaah , someone else (in the States) likes Roy Wood !

  Henry , we really may BE " brothers from another mother " :-) !!!!!"

I got into ELO when they finally evolved back to "top 40 pop" (1977-78).  I worked my way backwards until I got their early, "experimental weird S***""  Wondered, HOW the hell did they start like that?  Well... they didn't.  I worked further back.  Turns out The Move in 1968 sounds (to my ears anyway) almost exactly like ELO 10 years later.  They "evolved" full circle!

So then, slowly, I came to the conclusion I liked Roy Wood's stuff BETTER than Jeff Lynne's.  Especially when he's doing "pop".  (Wood's "weird stuff" is much, much weirder than Lynne's "weird stuff", or just about anyone else's).  My favorite Wood "solo" album is INTRODUCING EDDY AND THE FALCONS.  Hard to believe it's the same band that did WIZZARD'S BREW a year earlier, isn't it?  Talk about "schizo"!

Been listening to Roy Wood since at least 1979.

Funny thing, about 6 months back, I found some Move TV appearances on Youtube.  After more than 30 years of listening ot some of those songs from 1968 or so, I finally was able to SEE who was singing what bits on some songs.  Some of those songs, 3 different guys sing lead on different parts.  Wild!  I mean, it's easy for me to pick out Roy Wood, or Carl Wayne, but Trevor Burton & Ace Kefford, mostly a mystery.  (Bev Bevan is also easy... he's the one who sings with a DEEP DEEP voice, like Harry Hooper... heehee.  Which is hilarious, as Bev has one of the most "effeminite" speaking voices I've ever heard from an English rock & roller.  Or is that a put-on?)

I saw STAR TREK: NEMESIS when it came out in December 2002. It wasn't bad but added too many ideas like a sister planet for Romulus, naturally called Remus and another Soong android B-4. Also there was cloning, telepathic assault, a wedding and the feeling that everyone was getting a bit old for this!

Also they put it out five days before THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS, killing any chance of a good box office. Star Trek deserved a better end.
 
Robin Olsen said:

George, I believe the Star Trek movie you were referring to was STAR TREK:NEMESIS. The last James Bond movie I actually went to see was LIVE AND LET DIE. I was in the Navy and stationed in the Bay Area when two of my friends from Carpentersville, Illinois (my home town) came to visit, and we went to a drive-in in Mountain View, Ca. My favorite line was "Billy Bob'll get his ass - he's got the fastest boat on the damn river!". It don't look so funny on paper, but the way the southern sheriff character said it just cracked me up!
 
George Poague said:

I walked out of one of the Pierce Brosnan Bond films out of sheer boredom. (It wasn't Goldeneye, which I liked, but one of the later ones). I also walked out of the last Star Trek movie before J.J. Abrams rebooted the franchise. I don't remember the title, but the reason was the same: sheer boredom. I'd seen it all before.

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