Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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I read somewhere there were some serious problems with that movie but they pushed it through anyway. Possibly to get it out while the first film was still popular.

All I remember from the Hobbit was some guy shot Smaug in a space where he'd lost a scale in his youth that had never grown back, the only spot where he was vulnerable, with a black arrow that he made a big deal about never failing him in the past. I was surprised at how early in the book the dragon was dead and it's death didn't solve that much and led to war. And Tolkien saying he had to rewrite the chapter where Bilbo met Gullum because it didn't match what he'd written in Lord of the Rings. 

As for LOTR, I got bored halfway through book two and skipped to the last couple of chapters in book three to see how the darned thing ended.   

RE: The Hobbit: Book Versus Movie (Two Out of Three Falls)

  • Tauriel- sadly not in the book. In fact there are NO women of importance in the book. But she was a dynamic and empathic character. Beautiful, courageous, kind and a killing machine!
  • Legolas-- not in the book but possible since Tolkien made him the son of the King of the Woodland Elves in LOTR. Worked hard to be the coolest guy in the movie!
  • Kili--despite trying to be Middle-Earth's Romeo & Juliet, Kili was just one member of the company albeit he was Thorin's nephew. There were no romance unless it was Bombur and food!
  • The Battle did happen in the book, though it was never elaborated on. Gandalf mentions that he and "The White Council" fought the Necromancer after he left the Company prior to the Dwarves and Bilbo entering Mirkwood Forest. That's why Gandalf doesn't reappear until the Battle of the Five Armies really kicks in. And we learn in LOTR (the book) that the Necromancer was Sauron.
  • Galadriel, Elrond and Saruman were indeed the White Council along with Gandalf. In fact, SPOILER ALERT: three of them possess the Three Elven Rings of Power!
  • Bard is a character in The Hobbit (the book). He's called Bard the Bowman and he used his Black Arrow (shot from an ordinary bow) to kill Smaug, Greatest and Chiefest of All Calamities through a bare patch in his underside that Bilbo spotted and relayed to Bard via a friendly thrush!
  • But he has no family in the book.
  • Radagast the Brown (AKA Doctor Wizard) was mentioned in the book by Gandalf while introducing himself to Beorn. But he does not physically appear until LOTR and only in flashback.
  • The Master of Laketown is in the book and is quite the politician! But Alfrid does not.
  • Azog is in the book but dies when Thorin thinks he did. Bolg, son of Azog appears, leading the Orcs (called Goblins in the book) in the Battle of the Five Armies.
  • Thorin Oakenshield succumbs to wounds from the battle which gave him a nice deathbed scene where he reconciles with Bilbo. Kili and Fili are killed, protecting their fallen uncle and all three are removed from the battlefield by Beorn in his massive bear form!
  • Of course Beorn was at the Battle but Radagast was not, in the book!
  • Smaug's death WAS the reason for the Battle because all that treasure was now unguarded! The Woodland Elves and the Men from Laketown thought the Dwarves were vaporized by then!
  • Bilbo tells the Dwarves about the Rig but kept it secret in the movies.
  • And the Company goes to the Lonely Mountain in the book intact, not split up as in the movies.
  • Bilbo goes into the Mountain THREE times in the book and alone!

Dungeons and Dragons originally made the orcs slightly shorter than humans. Today they're as big as ogres in rpgs, which is strange since, if Sam and Frodo were able to pass themselves off as orcs, orcs can't be very big.

The Orcs vary in size. The Moria Orcs were smaller than the Mordor Orcs and the Urak-hai towered over them.

D&D usually has all orcs the same size but they've done something similar with goblins. Regular goblins are four feet tall while hobgoblins are six feet and the furry animal like bugbear goblinoids are seven feet. The original plan was to put orcs between goblins and hobgoblins but other games turned them into hulking giants and D&D started following that idea when Hasbro bought the company.

Thanks! That's exactly what I needed!

Philip Portelli said:

RE: The Hobbit: Book Versus Movie (Two Out of Three Falls)

  • Tauriel- sadly not in the book. In fact there are NO women of importance in the book. But she was a dynamic and empathic character. Beautiful, courageous, kind and a killing machine!
  • Legolas-- not in the book but possible since Tolkien made him the son of the King of the Woodland Elves in LOTR. Worked hard to be the coolest guy in the movie!
  • Kili--despite trying to be Middle-Earth's Romeo & Juliet, Kili was just one member of the company albeit he was Thorin's nephew. There were no romance unless it was Bombur and food!
  • The Battle did happen in the book, though it was never elaborated on. Gandalf mentions that he and "The White Council" fought the Necromancer after he left the Company prior to the Dwarves and Bilbo entering Mirkwood Forest. That's why Gandalf doesn't reappear until the Battle of the Five Armies really kicks in. And we learn in LOTR (the book) that the Necromancer was Sauron.
  • Galadriel, Elrond and Saruman were indeed the White Council along with Gandalf. In fact, SPOILER ALERT: three of them possess the Three Elven Rings of Power!
  • Bard is a character in The Hobbit (the book). He's called Bard the Bowman and he used his Black Arrow (shot from an ordinary bow) to kill Smaug, Greatest and Chiefest of All Calamities through a bare patch in his underside that Bilbo spotted and relayed to Bard via a friendly thrush!
  • But he has no family in the book.
  • Radagast the Brown (AKA Doctor Wizard) was mentioned in the book by Gandalf while introducing himself to Beorn. But he does not physically appear until LOTR and only in flashback.
  • The Master of Laketown is in the book and is quite the politician! But Alfrid does not.
  • Azog is in the book but dies when Thorin thinks he did. Bolg, son of Azog appears, leading the Orcs (called Goblins in the book) in the Battle of the Five Armies.
  • Thorin Oakenshield succumbs to wounds from the battle which gave him a nice deathbed scene where he reconciles with Bilbo. Kili and Fili are killed, protecting their fallen uncle and all three are removed from the battlefield by Beorn in his massive bear form!
  • Of course Beorn was at the Battle but Radagast was not, in the book!
  • Smaug's death WAS the reason for the Battle because all that treasure was now unguarded! The Woodland Elves and the Men from Laketown thought the Dwarves were vaporized by then!
  • Bilbo tells the Dwarves about the Rig but kept it secret in the movies.
  • And the Company goes to the Lonely Mountain in the book intact, not split up as in the movies.
  • Bilbo goes into the Mountain THREE times in the book and alone!

Why exactly aren't Radagast the Brown and the rest of that group, or Tom Bombadil, doing anything in the War of the Rings? The world is about to end, why aren't these vastly powerful beings getting involved?

 

When Christianity took over, Thor's sacred oak tree was cut down and used to build a church, a sign the old gods had passed. Probably where Tolkien got the name Thorin Oakenshield from.



Ron M. said:

Why exactly aren't Radagast the Brown and the rest of that group, or Tom Bombadil, doing anything in the War of the Rings? The world is about to end, why aren't these vastly powerful beings getting involved?


They were hanging out in the same place The Spectre and all of Marvel's pantheons are when the earth is about to destroyed. Slackers!
My wife and I stumbled onto "Snowpiercer" the other night. It was pretty good, but waaaaaay different than the GN. For one thing, it had a happy ending, which makes it a different kind of story.

Coincidentally we watched Snowpiercer on Saturday. Haven't read the GN but enjoyed it as good SF.

Captain Comics said:

My wife and I stumbled onto "Snowpiercer" the other night. It was pretty good, but waaaaaay different than the GN. For one thing, it had a happy ending, which makes it a different kind of story.

And the Living Tribunal seems to want to make his job tougher on himself. He senses great evil so he'll destroy the world/galaxy/dimension/whatever to stop the evil from getting to other worlds/galaxies/dimensions/whatever. Why doesn't he just destroy the evil?

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