Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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There are at least three. None of them are great but I like Punisher: War Zone with Ray Stevenson more than the others.

Saw Predestination with Ethan Hawke. A really nice sci-fi mind bender based on a Robert A. Heilein story.

Star Trek: The Motion(less) Picture (1979)

I doubt I've watched this all the way thru (or, really, any significant piece of it) in 25 years or more.  In fact, I've avoided it because I was so disappointed in it when it first came out.

Looking at it with a little perspective ... well, I still don't really like it, but it does have its moments, and the problems (usually) have more to do with the script than with the actors.

Also: Blu-Ray doesn't always do older movies any favors, and there's some of that here, but there re shots here that are truly gorgeous.  (The problem was that the filmmakers sometimes forgot that we were watching a movie, not admiring a work of art.)

I think it was more like the TV show than the other movies with the original crew, in that it was based around a plot-of-the-week-style idea. Most of the others were more action-oriented and continuity-based. I haven't seen IV.

Back on p.173 I wrote about Seven Footprints to Satan from 1929 (and got its title wrong). I didn't realise the movie had the same male star as The Cat and the Canary (1927), Creighton Hale. Although their plots are quite different they're similar movies in their mixes of comedy and horror and their country house settings. I see his casting as confirmation that Seven Footprints to Satan's makers meant to make a film in the same vein as The Cat and the Canary and The Bat.

Apparently Hale often appeared in bit parts in the sound era, including in some well-known films. Other former stars who appeared in supporting roles later in their careers include Victor McLaglen and William Powell: but the roles they played weren't bit parts.

Bruce Cabot, the romantic lead in King Kong (1933), appeared after the war in older-man supporting roles in a number of John Wayne films (and was very good in them). Bruce Bennett, who some might know from his roles in Sahara (1943) and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948 - he's the American who tries to talk the lead trio into letting him join them), was originally Herman Brix, under which name he played Tarzan in the 1935 serial The New Adventures of Tarzan (from which the movie of the same name and Tarzan and the Green Goddess were culled). He also played a psychiatrist in The Alligator People (1959).

I've been watching Blonde Savage (1947), a jungle queen movie, at Internet Archive.

An early scene has the following dialogue:

She: You didn't learn to kiss like that in Africa.
He: Uh-uh. I used to play trombone in the school band. I was just giving you the first 32 bars of the William Tell Overture.

She: Ooh, play the next 32 baby.

He: Only now I know what to make William tell.

This is from a scene nearer the climax:

Hero: I wouldn't get too tough if I were you. Not with two murders already on your hands.

Villain: It seems to me you made rather good use of the three weeks you were away.

Sidekick: Yeah, and we're gonna see that you hang if that's the last thing we ever do.

Henchman: Keep your mouth shut unless you want me to close if for you.

Sidekick: I can do it myself bud. I've been doing it ever since the day it was born.

Hero: Hoppy's right. We got enough information in that village to have you tried for murder.

The villains have the heroes at their mercy at the time. I'm not sure telling them that is an optimal survival strategy.

There's a good line at the climax:

Villain: Do you mind telling me how you got out of that cell?

Sidekick: We played gin rummy with the guard and won the keys.

It's definitely a B-movie, but it's a lot more entertaining than a fair number of Tarzan films.

Quite a few movies back then were like that, especially mysteries. Boston Blackie annoyed Inspector Farraday constantly that way in a series of films. Wallace Ford does quite a bit in The Mummy's Hand in 1940.

I never thought about it that way, but I can see your point.  Harve Bennett, in his commentary to STIII, says very explicitly that he was trying to write an action movie, not a science fiction movie.
 
Luke Blanchard said:

I think it was more like the TV show than the other movies with the original crew, in that it was based around a plot-of-the-week-style idea. Most of the others were more action-oriented and continuity-based. I haven't seen IV.

I'm pretty sure I'm the only one I know who TiVos Boston Blackie movies.

"Oh, I wish I had a pencil-thin mustache ..." 
 
Ron M. said:

Quite a few movies back then were like that, especially mysteries. Boston Blackie annoyed Inspector Farraday constantly that way in a series of films. Wallace Ford does quite a bit in The Mummy's Hand in 1940.

Last weekend my brothers, a sister-in-law and soon to be sister-in-law and a niece and I got together in Las Vegas.  I didn't do much gambling -- managed to whittle down $20 and that was about it, but did spend a lot treating everyone to an ersatz-Beatles' show and dinner.  Saturday night, while most of the others went to try their luck on the one-armed bandits I just stayed in the hotel room and wound up catching the Svengoolie show -- a modern version of ye olde Creature Features.  This time the feature was Son of Dracula, from 1943, starring Lon Cheney, Jr., as Drac Jr.  I mostly recall Cheney for his role as the ultra-whiney Larry Talbot, aka the Wolfman!  Cheney had also done rounds as the Frankenstein Monster and the Mummy, thus taking a turn at each of Universal's most famous monsters.  Alas, Cheney was simply horrid as the Transylvanian Count, coming off as more of a dumb hick than a sophisticated bloodsucking fiend and more pathetic than ever frightening.  He certainly didn't inherit any of Cheney, Sr.'s acting skills or charisma!  At least Svengoolie's dumb puns and jokes were amusing enough.

Lon Chaney Jr. wasn't given much to work with there. It wasn't a very good movie.

I caught the last 40 minutes or so of The January Man, a Kevin Kline flick from the '80s where he plays an NYPD detective on the trail of a serial killer who strangles women with scarves. The killer is known as "The January Man" and he's meticulous about his doings and follows a pattern with clues to what he's up to, much like The Riddler (or The Joker from the Silver Age, back when he used to be a clever crook and not today when he's just a deranged murderer).

The movie was no great shakes, but I was struck by the all-star cast, which included Alan Rickman, Mary Elizabeth Mastrontonio, Danny Aiello, Harvey Keitel, Rod Steiger and Susan Sarandon.

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